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rpagliari
12-Jun-2019, 17:31
I'm usually getting tiny white spots on the developed film, much like these (https://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/100849/why-are-there-little-white-dots-on-my-bw-negative-and-how-can-i-fix-it), from another photographer.

In my case I have far fewer and I have to zoom all the way in to get to see them. Mine are much smaller and equal in size, so I don't think it's dust.

Is it normal, or do I have to wash for a longer period of time (I'm washing 10min and use the Ilford rapid fixer)?

Pat Kearns
12-Jun-2019, 21:26
This looks more like mineral contaminants in your chemicals and/or water but I'm not ruling out dust either. Solutions: mix your chemicals with distilled water, developer should be used as a one shot. Check your fixer for sediment, filter the fixer to rid any sediment, if you are using hypo eliminator to reduce washing time check that for sediment. Use Kodak Photo Flo or similar product in distilled water as a final rinse to break the surface tension of the water on the negatives prior to hanging the negatives to dry. Dry negatives in a dust free environment. This should help rid a lot of your problems.
Pat Kearns

ic-racer
13-Jun-2019, 07:23
I'm usually getting tiny white spots on the developed film, much like these, from another photographer.

The link shows as a positive on my computer. Reversing back to a negative demonstrates black spots, so I'm confused.

Either way, try a box of fresh film and see if the problem persists.

Andrew O'Neill
13-Jun-2019, 08:22
Are they actually white spots on the negative??

tgtaylor
13-Jun-2019, 21:58
IIRC white spots on negatives can be caused by using an acid stop. Anyway, a white spot on a negative results in a black spot on the print which is impossible to spot-out without using a razor blade to scrape it off which I have never been successful at = always ending-up with a bigger spot that was even more noticeable. What you want to do is to turn the white spot on the negative into a black spot on the negative which results in a white spot on the print which you can readily spot out. You can do that with a fine point sharpie, spot tone, ballpoint, crocein scarlet...etc. Years back I watched a guy at a rental darkroom sit down with an 8x10 print and spot out dozens of clear spaces in a foliage shot that he didn't want there. Upon close inspection when he was finished you couldn't tell it was spotted at all. It did improve the print!

Thomas

koraks
14-Jun-2019, 01:09
IIRC white spots on negatives can be caused by using an acid stop.

I have only seen this occasionally with xray film (very soft/thin topcoat) and developers with high pH (e.g. pyro). It doesn't happen with e.g. XTOL/MyTol. According to PhotoEngineer (Photrio), the acetic stop pinhole problem was limited to very old, soft emulsions in deep-tank processing. It's not a practical concern in contemporary films intended for photography.

The picture OP links to suggests that the problem is dark spots on the negative resulting in white spots on the positive. I would look into the direction of particulate contamination of processing chemistry. Ive had this happen myself especially with fixer that had been used or kept around for a bit too long, resulting in metallic silver precipitating out and embedding itself into the emulsion. Using fresh fixer resolved these problems for me. Other potential sources are calcium/magnesium salts precipitating from the developer (particularly when using tap water) or just plain dust/dirt in processing tanks, trays and storage containers.

rpagliari
14-Jun-2019, 17:35
Are they actually white spots on the negative??

Hi,
they are white spots on the positive image.

rpagliari
17-Jun-2019, 16:35
Thanks for your help. Using distilled water solved the problem.

Tin Can
17-Jun-2019, 16:40
Good to hear!

I also drink only distilled.


Thanks for your help. Using distilled water solved the problem.

Willie
17-Jun-2019, 19:09
Hi,
they are white spots on the positive image.

White spots on the print mean dark spots on the negative.

Any chance you have a Charcoal type filter in the water line?

Using a Charcoal type filter for taste means you get small bits of charcoal in the water. A lot when first installed. Diminish quickly with running water through them.

Might check and see.

12pmc
21-Jun-2019, 09:18
I also have the experience from time to time, totally random. I use deep tank, one shot dev, one shot citric acid stop and normal fixer but reuse several time. Water is house hold supply through a domestic water softener. Reading above comments I will thoroughly clean all my containers, and look at using distilled water for mixing.

Thomas above suggested spotting the negatives - can I use the same ink used to spot prints, but on the negatives?

Thanks for any comments
Peter