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Kevs
24-Apr-2019, 10:20
Hi All
I have been looking at going back to film for some time now, I was patiently waiting for a friend to sell his Hasselblad xpan II kit. Sadly the little blighter sold it and I didnít have a clue, so time to move on to bigger and better things!

I have been watching Ben Horneís channel for 12 or so months finding it good clean information coupled with a great insight into LF photography, then stumbled across here and got stuck in reading. By no means done yet but seriously interested to dip my toes in the emulsion so to speak.

As the title suggests Iím looking at the 4x5 Tachihara. I have read the post on here regarding loose front standard and the addition of nylon washers and was wondering if anybody would like to enlighten me further still on this camera ie good first buy, good resale (if I decide to move to larger or itís not actually for me) Longest/shortest lenses (I think 70 to max of 300?) and is $800 a fair price for a mint one owner?

Sorry for all the questions, I see they get asked regularly but as you all know itís personal choice.

Finally I had better say itís for landscapes.

Many thanks in advance for your words of wisdom

alexvaras
24-Apr-2019, 10:32
Hi,

It was my first 4x5 camera, I sold it only because it had a Graflok back and I wanted Spring wooden back, otherwise I would keep it now.
True about the loose front, anyway I had no problem with it.
For that price you can get a another wooden field camera with more movements, maybe not so light anyway, so yes you can get a good sample.
Resale, my guess is same price as you bought it if you keep it without any damage, or as I did for a quick selling drop one lens and two cut film holders and that's it.
Shame on me I just did a couple of photos with my new one...

Alex

Ken Lee
24-Apr-2019, 10:56
I purchased one, sold it and later got one again and kept it.

If you shoot outdoors and walk or trek, its small size and lightness are helpful. For general landscape shooting it has enough movements. Where substantial movements are required, consider a monorail. The 4x5 "Fiel Stand" model with red bellows, cherry wood and brass fittings is attractive to onlookers who consistently approach me more often than when I use any other view camera: it's a person magnet so if you want to be left alone you many want to consider something more drab.

With a 300mm lens you can't focus very close (see Formulas for Bellows Extension (http://www.kennethleegallery.com/html/tech/bellows.php) which features the Tachihara). Given a 300mm lens and 315mm of bellows draw...

1/F = 1/D + 1/B where F = Focal length, D = Distance, B = Bellows Draw
F = 300mm, B = 315mm
1/300 = 1/D + 1/315
1/D = 1/300 - 1/315
1/D = 0.00333 - 0.00317
1/D = 0.00016
Distance = 6,250mm or 20 feet and that may be a touch optimistic.

For landscapes at infinity a 300mm lens will work nicely. You can also use certain Telephoto lenses like the 400mm Fujinon T (http://www.kennethleegallery.com/html/lenses/index.php#400T).

Leigh
24-Apr-2019, 12:23
I have a 4x5 Tachihara and an 8x10 Tachihara with 5x7 reducing back.

I think they're excellent cameras for general shooting (no macro work).

- Leigh

Pat Kearns
24-Apr-2019, 15:40
I bought a 4x5 Calumet wood field camera in 1994 which was a Tachihara with a Calumet nameplate on it and continue to use it today. It is an excellent camera at an attractive price. I have Calumet-N 90mm, 150mm, & 210 lenses which were made Rodenstock and the front standard is very stable with them. It doesn't have front standard shift but I haven't needed that with my landscape photography. The only limiting factor with it is the bellows draw. You should be able to recoup your money later if you decide to sell it.

Chuck Pere
25-Apr-2019, 05:42
As for price I would check Ebay for sold prices to get an idea. Large format prices may be increasing but I'd think these would sell for more like $500-600 for just the camera.

Tin Can
25-Apr-2019, 06:26
Price may vary with condition.

Mint is a bad way to describe anything.

I bought one for $200 and sold it for $500 years ago.

Perfect with no scratches, flaws could go higher now.

However usually I buy high and sell low. Which also happens all the time.

Kevs
25-Apr-2019, 06:48
Thank you all for your reply’s, a few more questions and learning!!

Alex, you mention graflok and spring back. Is one better than the other, personal choice. Does the Tachihara come with only graflok backs?


Ken, thank you for a maths workout. I will spend time chosing a lens but no doubt will start at the 150mm mark, the prices seem to vary wildly from $150 upwards to over $300 even with the same f number. Will the $150 be ok to start with? The one I am looking at is the fiel stand, cherry wood, with brass but black bellows? Maybe an option when new or changed during life?

I see movement mentioned a lot, I assume this is akin to tilt shift in SLR speak?

Ulophot
25-Apr-2019, 08:23
Hi, Kevas. I'm the one, probably, who posted about the nylon washers. I have yet to find a supplier anywhere; they seem to have been a custom made item. Mine are metal, easily procured, and they work fine, really. The camera, as others attest, is light and sturdy, with adequate movements for much work. I use mine primarily for portraits with 210mm lens, and it's fine.

Tachihara produced quite a few variations of its models over the years. Mine has chrome fittings, not brass, and a black bellows. You'll see wood of different colors, bellows ditto, etc. My camera does not have stops for vertical positioning of the front standard; it is done by feel or visual alignment; the same model apparently introduced them later.

From what I've seen, $800 for a mint-condition one would be a good price. I paid less than $500 for my well-used one (or, not-so-well used) and have put about $150 into having it adjusted, replacing washers and screws, etc. You might consider looking in the $600-700 range for less-than-mint and put the money towards a lens.

Ken Lee
25-Apr-2019, 09:03
I see movement mentioned a lot, I assume this is akin to tilt shift in SLR speak?

Movements are one of the core value propositions of view cameras. Before you make a view camera purchase it may help to become better acquainted with view camera movements. There's more to it than tilt/shift. You should probably connect with someone who can show you a view camera or two.


I will spend time chosing a lens... Will the $150 be ok to start with? It's always fun and educational to jump right into something but just as with your first question, you might spare yourself some aggravation by becoming more familiar with large format lenses before purchasing. This forum is a great place for that. Just start reading....

...but not only about cameras and lenses: you could ask the same questions about film/developer combinations, tripods, light meters, camera bags, etc. It might be best to find someone in your area who is willing to teach and let you use some equipment first. Or take a workshop somewhere. The time and money you save will be your own :)

Alan Gales
26-Apr-2019, 09:55
I bought a Cambo monorail as a first camera. I had it about two months before the seller wanted it back and offered me $100 more than I originally paid. I then took my extra $100 and purchased a brand new Tachihara 4x5 which I had wanted in the first place after reading Ken Rockwell's review. I eventually sold the camera after I purchased my 8x10.

Tachihara's are extremely light weight and have a very bright fresnel which I found a joy to use. I really liked the camera but as with any camera there are a few drawbacks. I had the cherry version and it was so pretty that people would always approach me and ask about the camera. I was even told that I did an amazing job restoring the old camera. They were shocked when I told them it was brand new! ;) The other negative that I found was that the front standard is too weak for heavier lenses. I put a Fuji 250mm f/6.7 on it that I use on my 8x10 camera and it was too heavy. Of course if you are sensible and use lighter lenses on the camera like you are supposed to it's not a problem.

You don't see that many of them on eBay anymore. The last I saw, $800 for a one owner mint example is a good price. I've seen them go for more.

Here is Ken Rockwell's review if you are interested in reading it.

https://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/tachihara.htm

Bob Salomon
26-Apr-2019, 10:39
I bought a Cambo monorail as a first camera. I had it about two months before the seller wanted it back and offered me $100 more than I originally paid. I then took my extra $100 and purchased a brand new Tachihara 4x5 which I had wanted in the first place after reading Ken Rockwell's review. I eventually sold the camera after I purchased my 8x10.

Tachihara's are extremely light weight and have a very bright fresnel which I found a joy to use. I really liked the camera but as with any camera there are a few drawbacks. I had the cherry version and it was so pretty that people would always approach me and ask about the camera. I was even told that I did an amazing job restoring the old camera. They were shocked when I told them it was brand new! ;) The other negative that I found was that the front standard is too weak for heavier lenses. I put a Fuji 250mm f/6.7 on it that I use on my 8x10 camera and it was too heavy. Of course if you are sensible and use lighter lenses on the camera like you are supposed to it's not a problem.

You don't see that many of them on eBay anymore. The last I saw, $800 for a one owner mint example is a good price. I've seen them go for more.

Here is Ken Rockwell's review if you are interested in reading it.

https://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/tachihara.htm

Or, if you want current 45 wood cameras just get a Wista, virtually same specs as the Tachihara but Graflok backs and interchangeable bellows are available, depending on model. They currently are made from cherry wood or quince wood but, in the recent past, were also made from rosewood or ebony.

Alan Gales
26-Apr-2019, 20:36
Or, if you want current 45 wood cameras just get a Wista, virtually same specs as the Tachihara but Graflok backs and interchangeable bellows are available, depending on model. They currently are made from cherry wood or quince wood but, in the recent past, were also made from rosewood or ebony.

You are right, Bob. He could get a used Wista for less than $800. Also a used Shen Hao. I've seen used Chamonix cameras for $800 too.

Kevs
27-Apr-2019, 04:29
The Tachihara was pulled from auction and sold for $500. Ah well it was by far the best condition one I had seen and given what you guys have advised I wouldn’t pay more for for lesser condition.

More reading, understanding, patience and a little less shiny magpie syndrome ��