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Arg6442
16-Feb-2019, 22:42
Hey everyone!

After reading some good experiences of it, I bought a package of Ansco 130 developer from the formulary. Though I was pleased with the performance, I noticed that the print tone is fairly cool. I had read that it would be a slightly warm developer, and that was one of the main things I was interested in getting from it.

Is there anything I should try to make it warmer? My developing times have been 3-4 minutes and Iíve been using it just at room temperature (67-71).

For reference, Iím printing on MGFB glossy

Thanks!


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Merg Ross
16-Feb-2019, 23:21
Hey everyone!

After reading some good experiences of it, I bought a package of Ansco 130 developer from the formulary. Though I was pleased with the performance, I noticed that the print tone is fairly cool. I had read that it would be a slightly warm developer, and that was one of the main things I was interested in getting from it.

Is there anything I should try to make it warmer? My developing times have been 3-4 minutes and Iíve been using it just at room temperature (67-71).

For reference, Iím printing on MGFB glossy

Thanks!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

You could increase the amount of bromide in the developer. Are you using it 1:1 or straight.

koraks
17-Feb-2019, 00:32
Yes, increase KBr. Or just use a warmtone developer if you want warm tones! There are plenty around; I personally use ID68, but there are various commercially available soups as well.

esearing
17-Feb-2019, 05:22
Formulary 130 is very cold at 1:1 on Ilford MGFB and Berrger Neutral base especially when newly mixed, almost blue. On warmtone paper it is more neutral. Diluted 1:2 it is slightly more neutral but needs more developing time. I haven't tried further dilution yet.
Ethol LPD 1:3 or 1:4 is a nice warm tone developer or neutral at 1:2 and works with neutral or warmtone papers.

You can also use these after a bleach bath as a diluted second developer to alter tone. Bleach fully, redevelop using 1/2 to 1/4 strength developer until highlights return fully in normal room light. Have a wet reference print to compare.

If you selenium tone after the 130 the color shift has a more pleasant tone to me for MGFB in dark areas, more brown than purple, but also depends on range and volume of high tones in your print - lots of highlights still looks purple-ish to me.
a quick dip in bleach after full toning can shift it back to brown. rinse/fix and wash afterward.

Pere Casals
17-Feb-2019, 07:03
As always, there are several ways to control paper tone with Ansco 130.

To me this is the best, from Darkroom Cookbook:

Also, when a developer nears exhaustion it is unable to fully reduce the silver halide in
the emulsion. As a result, the print may appear to be red or brown, as it cannot develop all
the way to black. Because of this it is often possible to add as much as 50% used developer
to fresh developer to achieve warm tones. This is because the presence of used developer
prevents the silver halide from being fully developed to black. The amount of used developer
should not be more than that which would allow development to take place within a normal
developing time of two to fi ve minutes. This technique is especially effective with developers
containing glycin (Formulas: Ansco 130 and Dassonville D-3).

Drew Wiley
17-Feb-2019, 15:38
Depends on the specific paper, degree of development, final toning, and the freshness of the glycin. Unopened jars of glycin should be kept frozen. Fresh glycin is yellowish off-white to slightly tan. As it ages it goes mocha brown and finally almost blackish chocolate. Cooler images are more feasible with fresh glycin. If you use gold toner, stay with the classic formula and don't substitute benzotriazole. But if you do, you replace the gram wt of KBr with only 1/10th that wt of Benz powder.