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Greg Davis
27-Jan-2019, 08:43
For the newcomers in our group, this is a common question so I made a video on the basics of mounting lenses to boards.


https://youtu.be/hHxhU8xFeoE

Randy Moe
27-Jan-2019, 11:09
Thanks for posting an instructional video.

Always interesting to see who we are.

Pere Casals
27-Jan-2019, 11:13
Great !!

DiscoShrew
27-Jan-2019, 11:57
Piggybacking off of this thread because I think its relevant.

I have my Schneider 180mm MC on a lens board I bought off ebay, I believe it's made out of plywood. Now - I don't know if this is something I did,

but everything I move the aperture, the bottom scale has a piece of metal which scrapes, and gouges out the lens board. Once it gets past f11 or so it stops, and requires a real tug to move. Is this

a mechanism of the board, or did I somehow put it on wrong?

Leigh
27-Jan-2019, 12:01
Hi Greg,

A reasonable idea, but I think combining enlarging lenses and taking lenses in one video is a fatal flaw.

You might re-do it, splitting it into two videos, one for each subject.

- Leigh

Dan Fromm
27-Jan-2019, 12:17
Piggybacking off of this thread because I think its relevant.

I have my Schneider 180mm MC on a lens board I bought off ebay, I believe it's made out of plywood. Now - I don't know if this is something I did,

but everything I move the aperture, the bottom scale has a piece of metal which scrapes, and gouges out the lens board. Once it gets past f11 or so it stops, and requires a real tug to move. Is this

a mechanism of the board, or did I somehow put it on wrong?

You want to put a thin a spacer between the back of the shutter and the board. Use a compass, mark a set of concentric circles on a piece of paper, cut and try. You may need a couple of rings to get the distance needed.

DiscoShrew
27-Jan-2019, 12:34
You want to put a thin a spacer between the back of the shutter and the board. Use a compass, mark a set of concentric circles on a piece of paper, cut and try. You may need a couple of rings to get the distance needed.

Thank you for the reply Dan.

Just so I understand, the spacer itself can be made out of paper? I'm assuming I would want to use a thicker type of paper then?

Dan Fromm
27-Jan-2019, 12:39
Thank you for the reply Dan.

Just so I understand, the spacer itself can be made out of paper? I'm assuming I would want to use a thicker type of paper then?

Yes, paper. I'd steal a sheet of 20# from my printer. You don't want paper that will compress much.

Jac@stafford.net
27-Jan-2019, 13:56
Nothing personal, but my common complaint about you tube is way too much chatter. The maker's contribution should be evinced by hard tech, DIY, not personality air time.

AA+
27-Jan-2019, 14:06
Many modern lens-shutters also have a screw on the back near the retaining ring matching a hole in the lensboard to prevent rotation. Some people discard this screw, but I drill a hole in the lensboard to accommodate this screw. What is your opinion on whether or not to use the antirotation screw?

Best wishes --- Allen Anway

Jac@stafford.net
27-Jan-2019, 14:22
Many modern lens-shutters also have a screw on the back near the retaining ring matching a hole in the lensboard to prevent rotation. Some people discard this screw, but I drill a hole in the lensboard to accommodate this screw. What is your opinion on whether or not to use the antirotation screw?


Always use it!

Leigh
27-Jan-2019, 16:23
Many modern lens-shutters also have a screw on the back near the retaining ring matching a hole in the lensboard to prevent rotation. Some people discard this screw, but I drill a hole in the lensboard to accommodate this screw. What is your opinion on whether or not to use the antirotation screw?Hi Allen,

I always use it.
If one is not in place, but the threaded hole is there, I install a new one.

I cut a matching hole in the lensboard if needed.

- Leigh

Greg Davis
27-Jan-2019, 17:41
Nothing personal, but my common complaint about you tube is way too much chatter. The maker's contribution should be evinced by hard tech, DIY, not personality air time.

I am an educator. I wouldnít walk into my class, attach a lens to a board, then leave and expect any learning to happen. My videos are treated as much like my course material as the video format allows. That entails explanation alongside demonstration. I have seen far to many videos that donít explain anything about what is going on. For example, I saw a video the maker claimed showed how they ferrotyped prints, but the video showed nothing but a few prints that had already been squeegeed onto glass, but didnít show how, then cut to a finished print. No exposition given. Somebody hoping to learn how to do the process would be left scratching their head.

If my videos donít work for you, thatís ok. You can always make your own.

Jac@stafford.net
27-Jan-2019, 18:17
I am an educator. I wouldn’t walk into my class, attach a lens to a board, then leave and expect any learning to happen. My videos are treated as much like my course material as the video format allows.

Fortunately you tube can be fast-forwarded, rather like I did editing your post.

Mike in NY
3-Mar-2019, 09:15
Greg, this was an exceptionally well done video; you nailed it. Some things that I especially liked:

You introduced the topic and explained it was for newcomers.
You combined excellent visual demonstrations with verbal explanations, which appeals to different learning modes.
You showed the range of different circumstances that different viewers might encounter.
Your verbal explanations were easy to follow, you stayed on topic, and there was no excess chatter or going down tangential rabbit holes.
Your production values (stable camera, appropriate angles, clean audio, sharp video) all contributed to effective learning by the viewer.
It made perfect sense to combine the mounting of camera lenses and enlargement lenses in the same video. The materials and processes are so similar that two videos would have been redundant, and I think people would have wondered why you didn't just combine them into one.
You answered a nagging question I've always had about the lip on some retainer rings.


This is the first of your videos that I've seen, and now that I'm aware of your YouTube channel, I am sure I will watch many more.