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View Full Version : Is this Fungus? If so: How to disinfect and remove fungus from a filter?



l2oBiN
30-Nov-2018, 08:15
I purchased a kendo pola green/red filter. It has some white blotches on one side. Could this be be fungus? Maybe just dirt? Pics below.

What is the best way to clean this off?

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20181130/07dd744412a24e9a1de1affc1e0e8cb0.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20181130/c8266c1be9df94ed942d54a2ecc93f94.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20181130/f4b2586d154e5098cb2daf72aae63230.jpg

Louis Pacilla
30-Nov-2018, 08:26
This looks like haze formed between the clear sheets that trap the color gels in the holder. Try taking the holder apart and gently cleaning all surfaces with a damp clean soft cloth then dry all surfaces with a dry clean soft cloth.

aaronnate
30-Nov-2018, 11:41
looks like it. Can you separate the two layers?

ic-racer
30-Nov-2018, 12:05
My experience is that fungus wipes off easily, just like haze or other residue. What remains (if it does not clear up) is permanent damage to either the coating or, in extreme cases, the underlying glass.

morecfm
30-Nov-2018, 12:21
Typical seller disclaimer: "...should not affect image quality"

l2oBiN
30-Nov-2018, 13:48
What is the best way to clean it up and to kill the fungus?

There are some references on the net to a vinegar solution, others to peroxide and ammonia. I want to try and preserve my coating so donít want to dip/clean it in things that could be damaging..

Leigh
30-Nov-2018, 14:52
What is the best way to clean it up and to kill the fungus?

There are some references on the net to a vinegar solution, others to peroxide and ammonia.
It's difficult to make any recommendations regarding such a broad subject.
Fungi is a Kingdom in biology, just as animals, plants, and bacteria are Kingdoms.

It's estimated that the Kingdom of Fungi may include as many as 3.8 Million species.
Some commonly-encountered special groups are mushrooms, truffles, mold, and yeast.

Some fungi often encountered on lenses eat the fluoride anti-reflection
lens coating and excrete hydrofluoric acid, which etches the glass.

- Leigh

l2oBiN
30-Nov-2018, 17:17
For the benefit of others, here is an a reference from a peer reviewed journal on how to store optics to prevent fungus and how to clean and disenfect.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3864060/pdf/jceh_26_83_057.pdf

swmcl
30-Nov-2018, 19:06
IMHO, alcohol is the quite adequate for cleaning and fungus removal. In the form of Windex is handy but a pure alcohol would be best - metho is an option. Cleaning can also be affected by using dishwashing detergent or some such. Best not to get too precious about it really.

Personally, I would not use an acid like vinegar.

The article above is good too.

l2oBiN
1-Dec-2018, 15:39
Looks like it cleared up wellhttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20181201/e119ff2aea3a78090f92d38754cb3c10.jpg

Paul Ron
1-Dec-2018, 19:16
ooops

Paul Ron
1-Dec-2018, 19:20
so what was the cure?
did you use the solution in the article?

Pfsor
2-Dec-2018, 12:39
It's estimated that the Kingdom of Fungi may include as many as 3.8 Million species.
Some commonly-encountered special groups are mushrooms, truffles, mold, and yeast.

Some fungi often encountered on lenses eat the fluoride anti-reflection
lens coating and excrete hydrofluoric acid, which etches the glass.

- Leigh

A nice try, Leigh but fungi do not eat fluoride anti-reflection lens coating. They can only eat organic matters. And mushrooms and truffles don't do anything bad to the lens, (unless you smear the lens with them, quite a strange idea) you can leave them in peace.

l2oBiN
4-Dec-2018, 04:20
so what was the cure?
did you use the solution in the article?

Threw away plastic wrapper and paper cover. Disassembled all components and added to 1:1 ratio of cloudy ammonia and hydrogen peroxide in a zip lock bag. Left overnight. Washed off with foaming soap hand wash using bare hands for filter and brush for plastic casing. Then dried components with hair fan.

aaronnate
4-Dec-2018, 09:12
did it work?

l2oBiN
13-Dec-2018, 13:02
did it work?

Seems to have. I guess time will tell...

Steven Tribe
14-Dec-2018, 01:55
A nice try, Leigh but fungi do not eat fluoride anti-reflection lens coating. They can only eat organic matters. And mushrooms and truffles don't do anything bad to the lens, (unless you smear the lens with them, quite a strange idea) you can leave them in peace.

"Eat" is perhaps the wrong expression!
Many forms of life obtain their basic energy from chemical reactions other than the classic carbon oxidation. During the billions of years that the earth has existed (plus surviving passengers from even older comets etc.), life with the ability to utilise diverse chemical transformations has emerged in - to us anyway - very odd places. The best publicised in the last decade has been the Sulphur base life around deep sea vulcanic springs. Fluorides occur naturally, so adaption is something that has happened over millions of years, not just since the late 1930's when coating on glass surfaces started.

Pfsor
14-Dec-2018, 04:03
"Eat" is perhaps the wrong expression!


Not perhaps but surely!

In case you're knowledgeable about "surviving passengers from even older comets" putting in danger our optical equipment please don't hesitate to inform your nearest Academy of Science. You'll be the 1st one on the planet to do so! Good grief!

Steven Tribe
14-Dec-2018, 05:19
By "passengers" I mean complex chemical compounds like amino acids - not creatures with arms and legs! The whole question of what has been deposited on the earth from outside is in a state of flux and the theory of most water coming from comets is in doubt as the the D/H ratio is the same for the moon and earth. That material has come with comets from elsewhere in the solar system and our galaxy is not disputed.

Having never seen serious damage on uncoated lens as old as the 18th century (telescope objectives) but frequently discovered massive damage on coated lenses, there must be some very effective life forms around!

Pfsor
14-Dec-2018, 05:21
Never mind the complex chemical compunds, Steven. Keep us posted when the danger to our optical equipment is imminent!