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diversey
29-Sep-2018, 14:41
I will have a 10 day vacation in Maui, HI. Any suggestions for making large format photos in Maui? I have planned to take a 4x5 Camera, BW films, 75mm, 150mm and 210mm lenses. Thanks!

Bob Salomon
29-Sep-2018, 15:20
Drive the Hana Highway, carefully, lots of places to shoot waterfalls and sheer cliffs!

Two23
29-Sep-2018, 17:17
My favorite place is the top of the volcano. Dramatic volcanic landscapes, few tourists. It's basically b&w anyway so that would work quite well.


Kent in SD

Leszek Vogt
29-Sep-2018, 17:52
It's been a while and as I recall there were some interesting (black) rocks near beach....at the end of Hana Rd. It could be from surf pounding. The silversword plant at the top of Haleakala only grows there. Many beaches in between. Ha, it wouldn't be all that terrible if you got lost and end up at Mama's Fish House :>).

Les

Alan Klein
29-Sep-2018, 21:01
Haleakala volcano at sunset. I didn't go for the sunrise. But I suppose that would be good too. Take a warm jacket. It gets cold up there at 10,000 feet. Shoot some color up there also.

Vaughn
29-Sep-2018, 21:38
Drive the Hana Highway, carefully, lots of places to shoot waterfalls and sheer cliffs!
Once around Hana, there is a waterfall hike that passes thru a great bamboo forest.

diversey
30-Sep-2018, 12:50
Many thanks for everyone’s responses! Are there any art photography galleries in Maui? Thanks! David

Leszek Vogt
30-Sep-2018, 14:37
There were several galleries in Lahaina, but many exhibits later....that was 21yrs ago :>). Just looked up and there are 3, and even Peter Lik has one.

Les

diversey
30-Sep-2018, 18:07
Will go to see Peter Lik's gallery, thanks!


There were several galleries in Lahaina, but many exhibits later....that was 21yrs ago :>). Just looked up and there are 3, and even Peter Lik has one.

Les

Drew Wiley
8-Oct-2018, 10:00
All kinds of opportunities. I like the views up on Haleakala dawn as well as mid day. Just be aware that winds can often be intense on the higher parts of the crater, and view camera use can be tricky. The highway on the NW of the island has many rewards, but the Hana highway is slow and winding and rather rushed for a day trip; it's best to book a night or two in the Hana area itself. Forget galleries - some of the worst tourist trap trash on the planet (that applies both to paintings and especially Lik and his Fauxtoshop fakeries). .... Let me add that the mid-elevations on the mountain, as you drive up, can have spectacular lighting and wonderful views. Reminds me of the vivid green ranch lands near here in Marin County. I also
like taking shoreline shots of lava and surf where we stay at Napili.

Bob Salomon
8-Oct-2018, 12:03
All kinds of opportunities. I like the views up on Haleakala dawn as well as mid day. Just be aware that winds can often be intense on the higher parts of the crater, and view camera use can be tricky. The highway on the NW of the island has many rewards, but the Hana highway is slow and winding and rather rushed for a day trip; it's best to book a night or two in the Hana area itself. Forget galleries - some of the worst tourist trap trash on the planet (that applies both to paintings and especially Lik and his Fauxtoshop fakeries). .... Let me add that the mid-elevations on the mountain, as you drive up, can have spectacular lighting and wonderful views. Reminds me of the vivid green ranch lands near here in Marin County. I also
like taking shoreline shots of lava and surf where we stay at Napili.

I disagree Drew, I enjoyed looking in a Lik gallery, but the high pressure sales people were a turnoff.

Last time I visited was his gallery in Vegas where the Managing Director of Rodenstock and I stopped in. Since Lik uses a Linhof Technorama 617S lll and we were the distributor for Linhof it became a great way to turn off the salesman when I started pressuring him that Lik should update his equipment. Then we could peacefully view the images.
Print technique, too garish, compositions, very interesting.

Drew Wiley
8-Oct-2018, 12:25
First time I bumped into Lik images was accidentally in a lobby gallery near a trade show I was attending in Vegas. I almost vomited (literally). I've never seen such blatant contempt for natural light or actual natural beauty. The prints were big poorly printed inkjets - basically oversized cutesy postcards, horrendously colorized, often Photoshopped composites.
I've heard that his previous Aussie Cibas (printed by someone else) were better, but have never seen any. Why bother with a camera at all, if that kind of blatant fakery is the objective? I think his sales people are well compensated. They're pro and slick - the kind I'd never personally hire (we had a zero tolerance for BS policy). Otherwise his business ethics are similar his role model, Tom Kincade, and highly questionable. He pulled some dirty tricks to force out neighboring galleries in Lahaina. I'm very very skeptical those prints get anywhere near some of the alleged asking prices. I'm sure those sales people would negotiate them down to 10% unless someone is a complete sucker. They're basically shrewd car salesmen. If someone wants big loud decor glitz, Fatali is a fifty times better camera and printing technician than Lik, and much more skilled in his use color. Lik has far better mounting skills. I've seen better big prints for $200 from Ikea. It's all just above-the-sofa color splash decor as far as I'm concerned.

Bob Salomon
8-Oct-2018, 12:41
First time I bumped into Lik images was accidentally in a lobby gallery near a trade show I was attending in Vegas. I almost vomited (literally). I've never seen such blatant contempt for natural light or actual natural beauty. The prints were big poorly printed inkjets - basically oversized cutesy postcards, horrendously colorized, often Photoshopped composites.
I've heard that his previous Aussie Cibas (printed by someone else) were better, but have never seen any. Why bother with a camera at all, if that kind of blatant fakery is the objective? I think his sales people are well compensated. They're pro and slick - the kind I'd never personally hire (we had a zero tolerance for BS policy). Otherwise his business ethics are similar his role model, Tom Kincade, and highly questionable. He pulled some dirty tricks to force out neighboring galleries in Lahaina. I'm very very skeptical those prints get anywhere near some of the alleged asking prices. I'm sure those sales people would negotiate them down to 10% unless someone is a complete sucker. They're basically shrewd car salesmen. If someone wants big loud decor glitz, Fatali is a fifty times better camera and printing technician than Lik, and much more skilled in his use color. Lik has far better mounting skills. I've seen better big prints for $200 from Ikea. It's all just above-the-sofa color splash decor as far as I'm concerned.

When we went he still had the TV show on, I believe, The Weather Channel, gallery was pretty busy and there were people buying, unless they were shills, but I don’t think so.

We were working the PMA show, which is the major photo dealer show in the USA and some of those customers were wearing show badges.

Two23
8-Oct-2018, 16:00
I remember watching the Lik show. In one episode, he was at a location in Montana I've been to, and was going on & on about how deadly dangerous it was. I knew exactly where he was because I had hiked there a couple of years before. It didn't strike me as dangerous at all. In fact, I allowed my six year old son to play on the rocks in that exact spot by himself. LOL here! Wife & I were watching the show and looked at each other and said, "Huh?"


Kent in SD

Drew Wiley
8-Oct-2018, 19:46
Interesting. I've never seen his TV show, but there's a popular "wilderness survival" series on network TV these days, and several episodes were filmed very close to my tiny home town in the Sierras, and I recognized every single spot they filmed. In one case, the two daring adventurers (one being a celebrity) were dropped off by helicopter way "deep in the wilderness" - actually beside a popular lake about twenty yards from a two-lane highway. Then off "alone" they go to live on berries and rattlesnake meat, and climb remote rocks miraculously pre-roped (the film crew, rope riggers, safety people, and whoever set that dead snake there are never shown or mentioned). In another case, the wilderness guru crossed the range with no supplies at all; but every spot shown I knew to be less than a couple of miles from a road or occupied cabins - hardly backcountry - pretty much an area equivalent to a day hike of hunting when I was a kid. I find these shows entertaining because of their sheer stupidity. But up in the real mountains these last two weeks I did run into a few real Darwin Award candidates conspicuously under-equipped for the elements. It rained awfully hard, with some snow.

Randy Moe
9-Oct-2018, 09:47
1983 I won a sales award from Snap-On tools. Free everything, but I still spent way more than I expected.

Odd place to me. Walking with my wife after breakfast out of a Hilton, I was rudely accosted by a working woman. She said, 'Dump her and come with me'.

We were warned to not hike in the woods, as the marijuana growers were dangerous.

So we didn't.

And I won't ever go there again.

Drew Wiley
9-Oct-2018, 12:35
Guess you won't ever visit Colorado, or California, or Oregon, or Washington, Randy. Far more pot growers here than on Maui, and probably even more dangerous. 95% of it is still illegal. The last two weeks I was backpacking in Kings Canyon NP. Perfectly safe provided one is properly fit and equipped. Even the bears are polite. But the brush down in the Natl Forest lands below is infamously filled with heavily-armed actual Cartel pot operations. Nobody hikes there. Too hot and brushy anyway; that's why they hide there. Same on the coast here. The trailed scenic areas tend to be quite safe; and that applies to Maui too. My biggest worry there is always having to negotiate my wife waiting out a large format shot in exchange for taking her window shopping in Lahaina. I hate Lahaina, or actually, any kind of shopping row. But it comes with the marital territory.

Randy Moe
9-Oct-2018, 13:52
I won't go to Maui as I won't fly again.

I prefer to travel back roads if possible and have camped in nearly every state. 1/2 of Canada. and some Mexico.

Maybe I will get to Alabama and Alaska, maybe not. But they would make 50.

May the road rise to meet you.

John Jarosz
9-Oct-2018, 16:30
Haleakala is a crapshoot. No clouds and it an ethereal occasion. Heavy clouds and it's meh. Been there 3x and only got the no clouds view once.

Drew Wiley
9-Oct-2018, 19:46
I go up Haleakala specifically for the clouds. They can be incredible, especially as one begins to get above them. But if you wish to avoid clouds, be at the top at dawn itself. Looking at the sun rising over the Pacific from there is like witnessing the birth of the world, with the added benefit that tour buses won't be around for a few more hours. But due to the probability of high winds at the summit, I've given up on LF "kites" and switched to MF gear.

Alan Klein
9-Oct-2018, 22:44
Maui's Haleakala Crater at Sunset. 2014.

John Layton
10-Oct-2018, 09:07
My wife and I spent some time in Maui a few years back. Were lucky to have had some family there at the time, living in a neat little town on the north coast called Paia - very funky and laid back…a perfect locale for three amigos named Woody, Willy, and Owen to hang out! Our morning ritual while in Paia consisted of stopping by the local coffee shop for a java and bagel “to go,” then heading out to a nearby seaside park to watch some of the worlds best surfers having a blast with some epic waves.

At any rate, we also spent some time circumnavigating the island…and while I did not have my LF gear in tow - I at least had along my two (wide and normal) Fuji/Voigtlander 667’s - which, with my Feisol 3441, got pressed into service frequently, especially on the western half of the island - the Seven-Pools/Waimoku Falls (bamboo forest) hike, the beaches around Hana (where we spent four nights) and some really cool lava tubes. Oh…and some nice lava outcrops in the mist and surf next to the aforementioned park (will post some images soon). My only disappointment was Haleakala…could not see my hand in front of my face as it was epically foggy! I do love a bit of fog - but not like this!

For those interested in photographing the many waterfalls around the island…do keep in mind is that many of these falls are temporary - briefly springing to life after it rains. But the sheer variety of Maui’s “micro climates” is phenomenal. From record-breaking rainfall events in the lush Io valley, to the south coast evoking the heath of Scotland, to the magical bamboo forest, to the dry desert of Haleakala…there is something here for everyone! Just remember that, as photographers, we like to scan the landscape as we drive through it…and with this in mind I’d strongly recommend that you let someone else drive - especially on the Hana Highway!

We wanted to avoid the west coast (cannot get into the whole high rise/“club med” scene) - but we did briefly visit to see the “traditional” luau in Lahaina (worth it!) and yes…I did want to visit Peter Lik’s Maui gallery. (funny that when entering the gallery, one is quickly informed that Mr. Lik is “the worlds most famous photographer” …huh?).

At any rate…while at the Lik gallery…and after having spent some time in the bamboo forest, we quite naturally gravitated to the large print of the same subject. Must’ve spent a bit too much time viewing this print…because soon enough two minions appeared, removed the print from the wall, and beckoned us to follow them into small, somewhat dark room - where we were further instructed to sit on a comfy couch while they closed the door and turned out the lights. At that point my wife grew a bit claustrophobic, got up, and began groping for the door! This is also when our “program” began…during which some carefully aimed halogen lights slowly came up out of the blackness…illuminating the vibrant, metallic greens held within the Fujigloss paper - which started to glow as if by magic. Pretty neat actually - but a bit much for us. So when a bottle of wine appeared (along with a sales contract) we politely begged off and high tailed it out of there, back onto the street - and on to the luau…which provided us with a much nicer, culturally relevant, albeit somewhat (but appropriately) guilt-inducing experience.

As for Peter Lik - well, as much of an overblown, pretense-filled production as his may seem, and as much as his work does not resonate with me personally/artistically…at least he’s passionate about what he does, and has developed a business model that works for him in supporting that passion.

But I do have a question: could Mr. Lik tone things down…even just a little - without falling off the map? Interesting.

Oh…and when in Maui - do take the Fair Winds (diving tour boat) down to Molokini Crater off the south coast…the price is right, the beer is free, and the snorkeling is fantastic! And finally…do try to go in late winter/early spring - when the whales are everywhere!

Bob Salomon
10-Oct-2018, 09:24
“At any rate…while at the Lik gallery…and after having spent some time in the bamboo forest, we quite naturally gravitated to the large print of the same subject. Must’ve spent a bit too much time viewing this print…because soon enough two minions appeared, removed the print from the wall, and beckoned us to follow them into small, somewhat dark room - where we were further instructed to sit on a comfy couch while they closed the door and turned out the lights. At that point my wife grew a bit claustrophobic, got up, and began groping for the door! This is also when our “program” began…during which some carefully aimed halogen lights slowly came up out of the blackness…illuminating the vibrant, metallic greens held within the Fujigloss paper - which started to glow as if by magic. Pretty neat actually - but a bit much for us. So when a bottle of wine appeared (along with a sales contract) we politely begged off and high tailed it out of there, back onto the street - and on to the luau…which provided us with a much nicer, culturally relevant, albeit somewhat (but appropriately) guilt-inducing experience.“

My wife and I had a similar experience in Amsterdam in the diamond market.
We were staying at the Marriott and she asked the concierge how to get to it. They picked up the phone, made an appointment and gave us the directions and the time to be there.
Timing was perfect as we got there just as an English language tour was to begin. However they told us to take a seat on a couch as “our tour” would start in a few minutes.
So the tour group left through a door and we sat by ourselves until a young woman got us and took us through a different door for “our tour”. It was just the 3 of us going through all of the stops on the tour, we never saw the larger group until the tour was over and we saw them going through a door marked Store. Our guide took us through a different door and we ended up in a small room with a desk and were asked to sit in the chairs in front of the desk. Our guide left and a guy came in from another door. Sat at the desk, placed a black felt mat on the desk, a spot light turned on and he took a black felt bag out of a locked drawer. He opened the bag and out spilled a handful of loose diamonds!
We could not get out of that room until we bought one! Talk about hard sell!!

Drew Wiley
10-Oct-2018, 11:09
I saw that bamboo image on a big backlit transparency - the way all the sample images were shown. I found the quality of printing downright amateurish and unworthy of any serious pro lab, the image itself poorly focused and utterly idiotic, the presentation kitchy - reminded me of one of those Hamm's Beer backlit displays in bar windows. Tourist trash, period. My wife was looking at some knick knacks next door (she never buys anything unless its local macadamias or coffee); so I thought I'd have some fun ribbing the sales staff. They took it well, without reacting negatively, which tells me quite a bit about the internal business model. You have to pay well to get those kinds of people. But they remind me of time-share vac property sales people, who almost hold a gun to your head until you sign. Lik is said to have moved to the US due to legal issues in Australia. That also reminds me of his role model Thomas Kinkade, who drank himself to death after being indicted for fraud. Everything feels slippery, greasy-slick. The bamboo forest itself is about halfway up the uphill hike to the main fall on the Hana side of the Island. About a 4 mile round trip. Lots of tasty mango trees on that trail. I'd ignore the "Seven Sacred Pool" down below.

John Layton
10-Oct-2018, 12:41
A couple of suggestions for the OP: One - bring along a green filter...you'll be glad you did! (sorry if I'm preaching to the choir...but it seems that green filters often get overlooked these days). I brought my usual selection of red/orange/green and two ND filters - and found myself using the green and ND's for most of my work there. Would've used my orange on Haleakala if I were actually able to see anything (Alan K. I'm jealous!)

And two - If you will be renting a car...do avoid the (otherwise fun) mustang ragtop. These seem to be really popular as rentals on the island...and might be great for the Hana Highway - but for heading into and around the south side of the island...you'll want something with a bit of ground clearance. But also avoid a full size SUV - as both the Hana Highway and the road going around the northwest of the island are very tight (ask me how I know). Jeeps are fun...but if cloth covered are easily broken into. Then again...having the open sky above would be a great thing for lots of the islands great roads. Have fun!

Alan Klein
10-Oct-2018, 20:35
One comment about the lighting up on Haleakala Crater. It's at 10,000 feet. The lighting is very high Kelvin, almost ethereal. Very high contrast. Take that into consideration when shooting, processing and printing. It's also very cold so take a jacket. Also, the lower oxygen at the high elevation caught me off guard. As a past smoker I really felt it and at first had to stop to catch my breath.

Drew Wiley
11-Oct-2018, 17:44
We always take not only jackets, but hooded parkas. It's hilarious watching people arrive at the top wearing shorts, T-shirts, even bathing suits, and flipflops. There's nothing stopping the wind for thousands of miles around. It's certainly not always cold and windy, but it probably will be, especially at the rim of the crater where the best views tend to be.