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View Full Version : Ordered a Intrepid, now looking for lenses.



neildw
26-May-2018, 14:40
So, in my new journey of shooting large format I just ordered an Intrepid camera.
I ordered it because the investement is pretty low on the body, and after that I can always still invest in a new body.. in some time.

So, the body is actually only the body. So no lens or trigger.

Now I'm starting my search for a lens.

I want to do two things.

Architecture (evening/time)
Portraits.

So any hints are welcome.

Bob Salomon
26-May-2018, 14:44
A lens for what purpose?

And you will need the proper lens board to mount it.

neildw
26-May-2018, 14:46
A lens for what purpose?

And you will need the proper lens board to mount it.

I described the purposes underneath my original post. ;-)

Bob Salomon
26-May-2018, 14:49
I described the purposes underneath my original post. ;-)

That you did, but portraits, head and shoulder, ĺ length are usually done with a longer focal length and architecture a shorter length.
Which is more important?

Randy Moe
26-May-2018, 14:51
If itís the 4x5 get a 150mm lens and mount in offcenter, meaning lower, Linhof lensboard.

paulbarden
26-May-2018, 14:55
So, in my new journey of shooting large format I just ordered an Intrepid camera.
I ordered it because the investement is pretty low on the body, and after that I can always still invest in a new body.. in some time.

So, the body is actually only the body. So no lens or trigger.

Now I'm starting my search for a lens.

I want to do two things.

Architecture (evening/time)
Portraits.

So any hints are welcome.

You didn't mention which format camera you ordered: 4x5 or 8x10? They use different lenses.

William Whitaker
26-May-2018, 18:13
Regardless of size, format or subject matter, ask yourself how you see the world. Do you see more in a wide-angle way or do you see perhaps more as a "normal" lens way?

Myself, one of my favorite perspectives is the "long side of the format". I like a 35mm lens on 35mm, for instance, or a 120mm lens on 4x5. Some say that's not good for portraiture and strictly speaking I would agree. But my favorite lens on Hasselblad (6x6) has always been the 60mm Distagon. Yes, even for people shots and some portraits. Now, don't go sticking the lens up their nose, but still, it can be very effective, especially as it will enable including some of the surroundings for a more "environmental" look. Similarly, Joel Meyerowitz made some very compelling portraits using a 250 Wide Field Ektar on 8x10.

Two lenses gives you a choice. The long side of the format and twice the short side is a nice combo which will cover a lot. On 4x5 that would be a 120mm and a 210mm. Excellent combination. For 8x10 double the focal lengths and approximate to what's available. Like the 250 WFE and a 16" Artar. But a 14" is a good choice, too, as is a 450mm.
It goes on and on....

But that's MY take on it. Give us a little more info.

Vaughn
26-May-2018, 18:33
You have picked a lightweight camera, so one might as well keep on that path with lens choice. A Caltar IIN 150/5.6 (in a Copal 0 shutter) is a bright little all-around lens for 4x5. There are some fine light-weight lenses for 8x10 at the cost of a stop or two...fine for most uses, but I prefer the heavier f5.6 or so for the low light under the redwoods.

neildw
27-May-2018, 00:21
That you did, but portraits, head and shoulder, ĺ length are usually done with a longer focal length and architecture a shorter length.
Which is more important?

At the moment, portraits are more important. As a beginning and from there on I want to see if I can introduce the large format into the photography I'm doing now.


You didn't mention which format camera you ordered: 4x5 or 8x10? They use different lenses.

It is the 4 X 5


I am looking at lens boards now, but I'm trying to figure out the meaning of this ''Copal #0/1/2/..'' means...
For each lens, you have a different lensboard, I guess.

ottluuk
27-May-2018, 01:39
...

I am looking at lens boards now, but I'm trying to figure out the meaning of this ''Copal #0/1/2/..'' means...
For each lens, you have a different lensboard, I guess.

This will get you started on basics: http://www.largeformatphotography.info/lenses-primer/

Mick Fagan
27-May-2018, 03:59
Bob Salomon is right, I have lenses from 65mm through to 400mm for my 4x5” Shen Hao wooden folder. The lens I almost always end up using for architecture is the 90mm, reasonably often my 150mm and hardly at all, my 250mm.

For portraiture I sometimes use the 150mm but almost always end up using the 250mm.

I would suggest you need to learn how to use the camera and get used to the methodology required, a 150mm lens, is a very good overall lens. The coverage (mostly) allows you very generous movements, which, if you can get far enough back from your subject, should get you some good architectural images. By moving in close and extending the bellows you can do pretty good portraiture.

90mm is my go to lens for architecture and group photo shots, 250mm is my go to lens for portraiture, 150 mm sits in-between. All three lenses can do architecture or portraiture, a lot depends upon where the location is and how much space you have from the position you are in.

The Fujinon 150 f/6.3 in a Seiko shutter is one of the cheaper 150 lenses around. The quality is more than reasonable and this would be what I suggest for starters (or something like it). It uses a 40.5mm filter thread, so if you buy yourself a step-up ring, you should be able to use your existing filters. I have two of these lenses and use my Nikon 52mm filters on a step-up ring.

Some food for thought.

Mick.

Fred L
27-May-2018, 05:12
Not everyone photographs portraits the traditional way (head and shoulders) so you might want to define your style or loo. That will help with lens choice. I've used 75 to 210 for portraits and it all depends on what I'm after.

and don't forget a dark cloth, film holders, good tripod etc ;)

Bob Salomon
27-May-2018, 06:07
Not everyone photographs portraits the traditional way (head and shoulders) so you might want to define your style or loo. That will help with lens choice. I've used 75 to 210 for portraits and it all depends on what I'm after.

and don't forget a dark cloth, film holders, good tripod etc ;)

Actually what you should post is what lenses you currently use now on your current cameras to do landscapes and portraits. Then we can tell you what the equivalent lenses would be on 45.

John Kasaian
27-May-2018, 06:09
OK more questions: Will you be shooting B&W or color? Will you be shooting in a studio?
If you're shooting in color, a coated lens will give good results, a double coted lens even better.
If you're in a studio you'll probably be limited in distance so the focal length of your chosen lens might be more critical.

Quick answer---start a 150, 180 or 210mm in good condition, built by any of the major players(Nikon, Schneider, Fuji, Rodenstock) in a copal shutter.
The condition of the lens and shutter, followed by the price, would be the determining factors for me.

That would get you started, anyway.

neildw
27-May-2018, 06:11
I think I'm going to start with a 150mm f5.6
It looks like it gives me the best startingpoint to figure out where I want to go next but already be flexible.

Now I'm looking around on Ebay, for those already fixed on a lensboard.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Schneider-Xenar-150mm-F5-6-Linhof-Lens-Linhof-Board-For-4x5-Camera/202312971194?epid=101734633&hash=item2f1acaf3ba:g:-DoAAOSwSlRa-V6k

Randy Moe
27-May-2018, 09:27
Do you know the 4X5 Intrepid and SOME other cameras need an off-centered lens board? It CAN use a centered hole, but you lose the front standard zero notch and PERHAPS some movements.

Read this thread. http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?653-Wista-Lens-Boards-Why-the-Offset-Hole

Then look at my pics. The first shows the zero notch and the second shows how It gives some rise. The upper bellows panel is compressed.

Some here insist on new Linhof lensboards. They are the best. I have seen some imitations crack and fail. Notice the price of new lensboards. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/31341-REG/Linhof_001026_Flat_Lensboard_for_1.html?gclid=CjwKCAjwrqnYBRB-EiwAthnBFsKHcLpoELpQkgEQErq2hreaDT5y4FIz2SiY2uoZVelShAIyaq1gbBoCD8EQAvD_BwE#itemcode&smp=y&kwid=ZSMP&ap=y

Notice the price of a new lens. Some here buy only new lenses. This is a Macro lens, best at 1 to 1 with 150mm IC. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/177797-USA/Rodenstock_161100_120mm_f_5_6_Apo_Macro_Sironar_digital.html?ap=y&gclid=CjwKCAjwrqnYBRB-EiwAthnBFlvaPWAMjy6EWWdbal9CP6zZ6MCadMHVfKznLt4Z8uZGyUjOU4iKBxoCvx8QAvD_BwE

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1751/40580830830_aac4c93d33_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/24PZnc5)IMG-1117 (https://flic.kr/p/24PZnc5) by TIN CAN COLLEGE (https://www.flickr.com/photos/tincancollege/), on Flickr

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1729/28515523268_5068f71923_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/KrPvAU)IMG-1118 (https://flic.kr/p/KrPvAU) by TIN CAN COLLEGE (https://www.flickr.com/photos/tincancollege/), on Flickr

Randy Moe
27-May-2018, 09:33
It is preferred here to not link to live eBay auctions. It may indicate shilling.


I think I'm going to start with a 150mm f5.6
It looks like it gives me the best startingpoint to figure out where I want to go next but already be flexible.

Now I'm looking around on Ebay, for those already fixed on a lensboard.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Schneider-Xenar-150mm-F5-6-Linhof-Lens-Linhof-Board-For-4x5-Camera/202312971194?epid=101734633&hash=item2f1acaf3ba:g:-DoAAOSwSlRa-V6k

Vaughn
27-May-2018, 09:51
Intrepid wants 20 pounds for their 4x5 lensboard, so if you see a Caltar IIN 150/5.6 or similar going cheap w/o a lensboard (like this one: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Caltar-II-N-Rodenstock-N-150mm-f5-6-Copal-0/153031738975?hash=item23a167065f:g:xjsAAOSwS~FaXRaA ), it might be worthwhile. I have no connection with the seller...example only. Make sure the lens has its retaining ring to attach it to a lensboard.

Alan Gales
27-May-2018, 10:28
Buy an Intrepid board like Vaughn suggests or pick up a Technika style board. Both will work. Buy a lens wrench to attach the lens shutter to the board. I know it's a little more money but you will want one anyway. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/131992-USA/Rodenstock_260600_Metal_Lens_Wrench.html?sts=pi

You asked about Copal 0,1 and 3 boards. You pick the board to match the shutter. For example the Caltar lens that Vaughn suggests looking at is in a Copal 0 shutter so you need a lens board drilled for Copal 0.

A 150mm lens would be a great starting point. Also a 180mm or 210mm like John Kasaian suggests. The 210 is a tad long for a normal focal length but was standard for monorails. You can later add longer or shorter focal lengths as needed. Let condition and price be your guide. Later Caltar, Schneider, Rodenstock, Nikkor, and Fuji lenses are all plenty sharp and contrasty. If you took the same picture with all these lenses and compared them you would see only very minor differences. They are all good.

Bernice Loui
27-May-2018, 11:36
First 4x5 lens, suggest 150mm to 210mm modern Plasmat (typical f5.6 full aperture LF lenses) in a known reliable-accurate-predictable shutter (like Copal). Caltar, Nikkor, Fujinon, Rodenstock, Schneider does not matter. What is important, this first lens must be problem free as there will be a steep learning curved involved and the lens-shutter must not cause grief. Once the skills and feel of what using a VC is like, adding other focal lengths can be done with less trauma.

Wide angles range from 47mm to 125mm.

Tele range from 250mm to beyond 600mm.

Specific choice will depend on individual image making needs.


:)
Bernice

David Karp
27-May-2018, 19:30
Shenhao lensboards have worked well for me on my Walker Titan SF, Wista VX, and my ARCA Swiss adapter board. You can purchase them from a fellow named Rudy on EBay. His store is ecbuyonline2008. These are listed as "Linhof Wista Shen Hao Chamonix Ebony Tachihara Copal #__" . . . . He sells both off center and center hole Technika-type lensboards. If you can find them, Toyo also makes Technika style boards. These are also well made. You might find a lens without a board at a good price. No need to pay too much extra for a board.

For lenses, Fujinons are often available at better prices than some of the others. This makes no sense, as Fujinons are excellent lenses. A 150mm f/5.6 Fujinon NW (marked as "Fujinon W" on the outside of the lens barrel) is an excellent lens and is often available at a lower price than comparable Schneider, Rodenstock, and Nikon lenses. The same is true of Caltar II-N lenses. These are equivalent to Rodenstock Sironar-N or APO-Sironar-N lenses which were made by Rodenstock and branded for the now defunct (in the USA) Calumet Photographic chain of retail stores.

I have both a 150mm Fujinon NW and a 150mm Sironar-N. Both are very nice. The Fujinon has a larger image circle. The Sironar-N is a little bit smaller and lighter.

Rudy also sells lens wrenches.