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joedgaia
21-Apr-2018, 19:57
I'm seeking advice from members about the best 8x10 camera to use for location photography. I have a Burke and James but it's a bit clumsy (to say the least). I'm more of a street and location photographer and enjoy doing environmental portraits of people I meet. I've done this before with a Wista 4x5 camera and a an old Kodak folding 8x10 but it's been a few years and am looking to purchase a camera that is a bit easier and quicker to dial in than the B&J. I know this is a very complicated process but am looking for advice on what camera might have weight and set up speed advantages. Also, what tripod would be appropriate? Thanks for any advice.

joe murray | nativesonsfilms

Directors Guild Of America-Director
Int'l Cinematographers Guild -Director of Photography
www.nativesonsfilms.com

Two23
21-Apr-2018, 20:21
I'm going to suggest something like a Chamonix 8x10. They are medium-expensive, but very lightweight and easy in the field. They are also very nice looking cameras, something that might be important for what you're doing.


Kent in SD

Randy Moe
21-Apr-2018, 22:04
KMV Kodak Master View sets up very quickly.

And is self casing.

paulbarden
22-Apr-2018, 06:19
Lightweight, affordable and easy to use: considered the Intrepid 8x10?

mdarnton
22-Apr-2018, 06:27
That's one reason I bought mine, but a better choice would be a camera that didn't need the front placed and screwed and could be closed up with a lens on it. I've considered that a Century Universal 8x10, sort of a Crown Graphic on steroids with long bellows and more movements, would be the perfect camera for this, and they aren't too expensive for what they do:
http://www.largeformatphotography.info/century/century_universal_8x10.html

Oren Grad
22-Apr-2018, 07:31
Fastest setup? A non-folding camera. If you have vast amounts of money to burn and patience to search for a scarce camera that's no longer in production, Ebony SLW810. Very lightweight, too, specified at around 7 pounds. Slightly less vast amount of money to burn and want a camera still in production, Shen-Hao TFC810A, which is more or less a copy of the Ebony. About 8 pounds.

There was also a non-folding 8x10 Tachihara, but unlike the Ebony and Shen-Hao, that one had a very limited bellows draw and is really intended strictly for ultrawide work. Very hard to find, too.

Next fastest, much less money, but some patience may be required to find one in good shape with sufficient rigidity: any of the classic cameras with a fold-down front rail, for example Eastman No 2 or 2D. The Eastmans are a bit heavier than the non-folding cameras, though - more like 10 or 11 pounds.

Fastest traditional folding design I've ever used? Early-model Nagaoka 8x10. The folding design and detents were such that I could have the thing unfolded and ready to pop in a lens within just a few seconds. Also quite lightweight for an 8x10 - about 8 pounds. Hard to find, though. The most recent Nagaoka 8x10 looks quite different - I haven't used one, but it looks as though it has a screw-in front standard like the Phillips cameras, which is a bit slower to set up.

joedgaia
22-Apr-2018, 08:28
I guess a folding camera offers the most possibilities as it can be loaded into a backpack as I was able to do with my old Kodak. What tripod would be appropriate for this type of camera. Thanks for all the usable advice. I'll let the thread play out a bit more and start a list to narrow down.

On another note I've searched around and large format camera plans or even better, plans with hardware kits aren't available. With the resurgence in hand tools and woodworking interests, it might be a viable service for someone to provide.

Oren Grad
22-Apr-2018, 08:36
I guess a folding camera offers the most possibilities as it can be loaded into a backpack as I was able to do with my old Kodak.

The non-folding cameras I mentioned are very compact and backpack-friendly too. Take a look at the picture of the TFC810A on the Shen-Hao website and you'll see how the design works:

http://www.shen-hao.com/PRODUCTSabout.aspx?i=988&id=n3

Whether you want to spend that much money, of course, is a separate question.

Oren Grad
22-Apr-2018, 08:50
They will be out of reach for most people because of the price, but for completeness re the Ebony non-folding models, there was also an SL810, which was a bit heavier (about 9 pounds) as it had rear movements with the associated extra hardware, while the SLW had only front movements. Also an SL810U with asymmetrical rear tilts and swings, same weight as the non-U. Pictures attached, SLW on the left and SW on the right.

177436177437

Ari
22-Apr-2018, 09:15
Toyo 810M if you can handle the weight; it sets up in seconds and is precise and smooth in operation.
It can be used in the rain, snow or heat with no adverse effects on function.

Bruce Barlow
22-Apr-2018, 09:52
I think anything will work if you streamline your process. Find where the people are, get set up framed, and rough-focused. Drag someone in front of the camera, adjust framing and fine focus, click. In other words, bring the street to you. Just my opinion.

joedgaia
29-Apr-2018, 14:40
Thanks for all the info. I'm in the process of restoring a B&J and I'll use that while I keep my eyes open for a friendlier street camera.

Alan Gales
29-Apr-2018, 15:33
The Intrepid weighs 4.7 lbs and the Ritter weighs 6.4 lbs if you are looking for light weight. I can't think of anything lighter than these two. My Wehman weighs about 8.5 lbs and there was a lighter version made but it was still heavier than the Ritter.

Drew Wiley
29-Apr-2018, 16:38
There are significantly lighter 8x10's; but these are box cameras with little movement other than helical focus, rather than view cameras with standards and bellows. I know someone who uses one handheld. It's a lovely dovetailed mahogany and brass thing resembling an old time box camera with a moderately wide lens, perhaps around 10 inch focal length. It was custom made for him by one of the familiar Chinese companies, but I can't remember which one.

jp
29-Apr-2018, 18:16
Look for a B&J Rembrandt. Fixed front standard so one less thing to adjust. Basically an old fashioned studio portrait camera made a little more compact. Kodak Master View would also be a good choice.

Hard to beat the Ries Tripod for 8x10. Though there are good contemporary tripods, I think a wooden tripod would be part of your charm for working with strangers. More classy and less industrial/techie.

John Layton
30-Apr-2018, 12:07
Sounds like you want something simple, direct, unfussy - and perhaps you really don't need/want all that much in terms of movements.

I would suggest that in doing environmental portraiture...you won't be well served by axial movements - unless the setup is something like a subject placed near a wall and you're taking this obliquely...assuming you'd want this oblique plane in focus and could also accommodate the subject by means of aperture-enabled DOF. Otherwise, your only other consideration might be whatever "ambient" architectural geometry exists within a given frame - and the relative importance of making any desired perspective corrections...which might require lateral (shift, rise, fall) movements. But again, this might be relatively unimportant, and/or you might be seeking to photograph subjects pretty much "straight-on" with the camera basically level...which could mitigate any need for such corrections.

So...perhaps you'd be best served by something with no movements, but which offers some means of adjusting focus - like a helical mounted lens. Such simplicity would certainly translate to better logistics and "visual responsiveness."

Maybe give us some examples of photos you've already taken, or those from other photographers which feel close to what you'd like to achieve.

Michael Wellman
30-Apr-2018, 15:21
This almost sounds like an oxymoron for an 8x10 "bit easier and quicker to dial in" however I think the perfect camera for you may be the Svedovsky 8x10W. It's a non folding field wooden field camera. Weighs 3.5 Kg and cost $1600 new. Beautiful looking camera. http://svedovsky.com/cameras/8x10w-camera/

Oren Grad
30-Apr-2018, 15:51
This almost sounds like an oxymoron for an 8x10 "bit easier and quicker to dial in" however I think the perfect camera for you may be the Svedovsky 8x10W. It's a non folding field wooden field camera. Weighs 3.5 Kg and cost $1600 new. Beautiful looking camera. http://svedovsky.com/cameras/8x10w-camera/

Michael, thanks for adding that. Assuming they're decently built, that's a better example of an affordable non-folding-Ebony alternative than the Shen-Hao I cited up-thread.

Willie
30-Apr-2018, 16:34
https://parasolphotography.wordpress.com/2011/10/19/holga-envy-the-hobo-large-format-camera/

The Hobo 8x10 takes the gear to minimalist nirvana.

Randy Moe
30-Apr-2018, 16:40
I think the Afghan camera is hard to beat. Shoot and develop inside the camera producing a print fairly quickly.

A member did it, Joe ???? lives in the West.

https://www.wired.com/2013/11/afghan-box-camera-project/

Paul Coy
30-Apr-2018, 18:26
I'm seeking advice from members about the best 8x10 camera to use for location photography. I have a Burke and James but it's a bit clumsy (to say the least). I'm more of a street and location photographer and enjoy doing environmental portraits of people I meet. I've done this before with a Wista 4x5 camera and a an old Kodak folding 8x10 but it's been a few years and am looking to purchase a camera that is a bit easier and quicker to dial in than the B&J. I know this is a very complicated process but am looking for advice on what camera might have weight and set up speed advantages. Also, what tripod would be appropriate? Thanks for any advice.

joe murray | nativesonsfilms

Directors Guild Of America-Director
Int'l Cinematographers Guild -Director of Photography
www.nativesonsfilms.com

A long time ago I read an article about a guy that had a 8x10 that was hand holdable and I think a simple fixed, focus lens. I think it was hand made. I thought that was cool. Not what your looking for but still. I wish I could find that article.

John Layton
1-May-2018, 02:18
Willie - "Minimalist Nirvana" - great phrase! Love it! Can I use it? Tell you what...if I can use this, you can use one of my favorites: "Epiphany Junkie."

Jim Galli
1-May-2018, 09:56
These threads never peter out until every single brand and type from 1860 to present are touted to be just exactly what you need.

My help will be to think ahead about what lenses you will eventually want to use. Weight and mass come into play once you leave the f5.6 plasmat world behind. Look at my pages when you have time to waste. Most of the work is done with lenses that none of the cameras mentioned so far will tolerate. Perhaps that's not really an issue. If a 14" Commercial Ektar is going to be your go-to lens, almost anything mentioned will work. However if you're dreaming of a 16" Kodak Portrait lens, the field is narrowed down to one or two cameras.

My old workhorse is Kodak 2D. Packard shutter dwells inside the camera ready for anything I can put up front. I can throw it up and be focusing a picture in about 3 minutes flat. Some of that is from long use and familiarity. It's like an old pair of shoes.

One from this past weekend with the rear group only of a 14 1/2" Verito at 27" focus.

tgtaylor
1-May-2018, 10:51
A few years ago before I had the Toyo 810MII field camera, I took a Toyo 810G mounted on a Manfrotto 475B tripod and placed on a Davis & Sandford Universal Dolly from the car to the sea wall at Fisherman's wharf to photograph the wharf area. It was about 3 blocks from the car to the location and the pavement along the way was broken and uneven requiring a firm grip at the center of gravity to prevent the camera from toppling over when going over the bumps and dips but once on even pavement it rolled easily but firm grip at the center of mass is highly recommended. Once on location making minor adjustments are a snap and the wheels lock in place. If I was going to do "street photography" with the 810, I'd use the same set-up if the location was "fixed.". In fact, with a sturdier dolly I'd even consider "walking around" with the camera all set-up if I wasn't concerned with being as discreet as possible.

Thomas

joedgaia
1-May-2018, 19:08
177844I'm happy that my inquiry has resulted in such spirited dialogue. I have an affinity for photographing people in their natural habitat. Most of my personal work is taken with an A7r2 or 3 or Hasssy SWC or Leica but I want to go back to my view camera days for the challenge as well as the sense of craftsmanship. I used to own a Kodak D2 and like some of the cars I've bee graced to own in my past, I regret parting with it. I currently have a Wollensak 159mm and a 300/500 convertible lens. I'm in the process of restoring the B&J and will post some photos in a week or so.

cuypers1807
1-May-2018, 19:13
Look at the work of Greg Miller.
https://www.gregmiller.com

His 8x10 "street" work is wonderful.

Randy Moe
1-May-2018, 19:16
177844I'm happy that my inquiry has resulted in such spirited dialogue. I have an affinity for photographing people in their natural habitat. Most of my personal work is taken with an A7r2 or 3 or Hasssy SWC or Leica but I want to go back to my view camera days for the challenge as well as the sense of craftsmanship. I used to own a Kodak D2 and like some of the cars I've bee graced to own in my past, I regret parting with it. I currently have a Wollensak 159mm and a 300/500 convertible lens. I'm in the process of restoring the B&J and will post some photos in a week or so.

I give up 71 or 72 Nova?

I had a 78 Nova 2 door Hatchback. Biggest hatch ever, made it a camper.

Oren Grad
1-May-2018, 21:50
https://parasolphotography.wordpress.com/2011/10/19/holga-envy-the-hobo-large-format-camera/

The Hobo 8x10 takes the gear to minimalist nirvana.


A long time ago I read an article about a guy that had a 8x10 that was hand holdable and I think a simple fixed, focus lens. I think it was hand made. I thought that was cool. Not what your looking for but still. I wish I could find that article.

I have an 8x10 Hobo. By size, weight and shape it's arguably hand-holdable, even allowing for the weight of a film holder stuffed in the back. But there are a few challenges with that in practice. First, mine was built for the 120 Super Angulon, which I think was standard for the camera; I know there's also at least one out there that was built for the 90 Angulon (yes, you get an almost-circular image on a black background with that). That's either ultrawide or superduperultrawide - not what people normally think of for portraiture, though there's nothing wrong with doing things differently if it works for you. Second, the camera as sold is fixed focus, though you can shim the focus for something closer than hyperfocal distance for your chosen aperture. The workaround would be to tie a string of the right length to the camera and use that to position yourself relative to your subjects. Third problem, if you want to have a prayer of covering the whole sheet with the 120, is that you really want to stop down to f/45. It's also good to stop down for a bit of insurance against focus error, especially if you intend to enlarge. But even with ISO 400 film there are few conditions where you'll have a hand-holdable shutter speed with f/45 as your aperture. If you use a center filter to compensate for the extreme falloff, forget it entirely. But again OTOH, if you don't mind doing things differently you could work at a larger aperture and accept the falloff and the focus errors.

FWIW, I had SK Grimes add a focusing helical to mine, and then I installed a real ground glass in place of the crude original plastic screen that really wasn't intended for critical focusing and composing. I've only ever used mine on a tripod - at $4 per sheet just for the film plus the additional cost and effort in processing, I'm just not interested in the inevitable low yield of usable negatives that I would get from hand-held use. But if you are game for ultrawide, it's certainly going to be as quick a setup as you'll ever see for an 8x10 - nothing whatsoever to unfold or rack out - just pop it on the tripod, pull off the lens cap and you're ready to go.

And of course, a Hobo is just a nicely-finished box. So even though they're tough to find these days, you could build one yourself if you're handy, or else you should be able to commission one from a camera builder for a whole lot less than it would cost to build a full-featured camera with bellows, focusing bed and collapsing design.

Bernice Loui
2-May-2018, 00:13
+10...


Once into 8x10 lenses-optics often dictate the camera type far more than the choice of camera dictating lens-optics to be used.

This could be a carry over from smaller camera format mind-set where the camera is the first consideration with the lenses-optics secondary.

Reality is once into 8x10 or larger, the choices of lenses-optics becomes limited as has been discussed with budget wide angle lenses for 8x10 ( IMO, wide angle for 8x10 is 150mm_ish, not medium wide or about 200mm). On the longer focal length end, telephoto design longer focal length lenses are preferred even if they do not have the optical performance of "process lenses" and similar. Which tends to limit the focal length range to about 250mm to say 450mm being most common and reasonable for 8x10. Typical focal length for 8x10 runs 12" to 14". Given these limits, and taking aperture requirements, this can decide the camera best suited for Street Photography.

With all this focus on Camera, or lens, there are other items that must be considered like tripod and how the stack of 8x10 film holders are going to be safely stored and transported. Then the small but absolutely required items, light meter, GG magnifier, dark cloth or similar, cable release, filters (if needed) and.... including the transport case.

All of a sudden the light weight street foto 8x10 camera becomes a fraction of what is required to make images on 8x10 film.



Bernice






These threads never peter out until every single brand and type from 1860 to present are touted to be just exactly what you need.

My help will be to think ahead about what lenses you will eventually want to use. Weight and mass come into play once you leave the f5.6 plasmat world behind. Look at my pages when you have time to waste. Most of the work is done with lenses that none of the cameras mentioned so far will tolerate. Perhaps that's not really an issue. If a 14" Commercial Ektar is going to be your go-to lens, almost anything mentioned will work. However if you're dreaming of a 16" Kodak Portrait lens, the field is narrowed down to one or two cameras.

mdarnton
2-May-2018, 05:48
The mention of carrying film holders reminds me of what I do: both FedEx and UPS make express boxes that are perfect for toting 8x10 holders. They hold three wood ones, and I strap a fourth to the back of my Intrepid as a ground glass protector, wrapping with my dark cloth, then strapping. All of that, plus two lenses, fits in a large messenger bag. A Manfrotto 055 is adequate for the Intrepid, and there you have a street-portable rig for what the OP wants to do. And it doesn't have "steal me" written all over it.

joedgaia
2-May-2018, 07:46
In reading these considered responses, I guess "street photography" was the wrong term? Maybe I should have said "spontaneous environmental portraiture"? There is some planning involved, but I'm looking to discover the inspired "controlled accident". I want to use the 8X10 cam to produce real world portraits that extend beyond the simple physical appearance and that express something more about the subject's story and their humanity. That's what interests me. Here's another taken with the Hassy SWC
177851

tgtaylor
2-May-2018, 09:24
Look at the work of Greg Miller.
https://www.gregmiller.com

His 8x10 "street" work is wonderful.

Although he has two assistants with him, for me carrying the camera mounted on a dolly covered with the dark cloth would be the better choice. You could carry the light meter on your belt and the film holders in a small backpack. For the type of work that he does, one lens would probably be sufficient.

Thomas

Bernice Loui
2-May-2018, 09:26
"spontaneous environmental portraiture"

View camera images are essentially not spontaneous, view camera images are more often than not, planned, conceived and crafted. It goes back to the difference between "Decisive Moment" images ideally suited for roll film, hand held digital and similar cameras. View camera images tend to be conceived, then methodically crafted in a controlled way to result in the image from one's mind. The very essence of these two different approaches to image making separates the types of images produced.

Environmental portraiture often involves moderate to really wide angle lenses to enhance and capture the individual (s) within their environment. For 8x10, this puts the desired focal length between 250mm to 120mm or one of the more difficult and expensive focal lengths for 8x10. To equal the image perspective of a Hassy SWC on 8x10 typical focal length will end up in the 150mm range or easily a $1,000+ lens and not always easily available.


Question to carefully consider, " What image making advantages will 8x10 offer over other image making formats including digital?"



Bernice




In reading these considered responses, I guess "street photography" was the wrong term? Maybe I should have said "spontaneous environmental portraiture"? There is some planning involved, but I'm looking to discover the inspired "controlled accident". I want to use the 8X10 cam to produce real world portraits that extend beyond the simple physical appearance and that express something more about the subject's story and their humanity. That's what interests me. Here's another taken with the Hassy SWC
177851

Corran
2-May-2018, 09:31
Something to consider. Not sure if anyone else has mentioned similar.

Decide what lens you want and what camera best fits that focal length. Considering your usage of the SWC, the closest focal length on 8x10 would be 120mm. For a more reserved wide-angle, something around 210mm would be better. The camera would best be something that can have its focus locked and setup repeatably. Once that's sorted out, decide what will be your typical focus distance. Measure out that distance with a test subject and get the camera focused, and locked down. Mark it somehow on the bed. Get one of those cheap rangefinders from Blik on eBay - doesn't matter if its accurate - and with the camera in place and focused right, focus the RF on your subject as well and tape down the focus wheel (you'll also need to attach it to the camera, so glue a cold shoe on the camera or something).

At this point you have a one-distance, coupled 8x10 RF. Of course you'll also have to figure out a viewfinder - if you don't mind spending money, the Linhof viewfinders are excellent, but won't be wide enough for that 120mm. Use your SWC VF if you go that wide (there will be a bit extra on one side due to the 4:5 aspect ratio of 8x10). As long as your setup is repeatable and the RF focus doesn't move, you could shoot handheld or on a monopod all day long at a single distance. I would still use a small f/stop myself, at least f/16 or f/22. 400-speed film in daylight should be fine at those apertures. If you are ambitious, multiple markings on the focus bed for different distances could work as well if you can estimate or measure focus.

Easier and cheaper thing to do overall though would be a Speed or Crown Graphic 4x5 with coupled RF to one lens.

John Layton
2-May-2018, 09:35
Contrary to my above post re the use of a Hobo-type camera...an aspect of photographing folks with an LF camera is the "sense of occasion" which this can bring - that even when the subject is not known (or well known) by the photographer, the presence of something like an 8x10 drop-bed or monorail camera and the ritual that setting up and making an image entails...can communicate to the subject a sense of importance and respect, as well as giving the subject an additional roll of collaborator. Just a thought!

Bernice Loui
2-May-2018, 09:43
Hassy SWC is a 6x6 square format camera using a 38mm Biogon, diagonal angle of view is 90 degrees.

120mm focal length lens on 8x10 is over 100 degrees diagonal angle of view or significantly wider angle of view compared to the SWC.
Root difference is square image formate -vs- rectangular image format. The SWC was a very wide angle camera when introduced, since then the angle of view possible has increased significantly. Examples are the 120 degree Super Angulon XL series and 35mm APO Grandagon. Coupled with a graduated center filter, these modern wide angle optics produce far greater rectilinear images on film than the Biogon used in the SWC.

Know none of these 120 degree angle of view lenses fully cover or has been designed for 8x10.


Been there done this,
Bernice

Corran
2-May-2018, 09:57
8x8 "square" crop = 200mm, 6x6 Hassy = 56mm, so the "correct" FL for the same FoV in a square crop is ~135mm. I don't think there are any 135mm lenses for 8x10, so 120mm is a little wider and 150mm is a little longer. Pick your poison.

Oren Grad
2-May-2018, 10:19
Picking up on Bryan's observations, and taking into account that Joe seems comfortable with the very wide square view of the SWC: if you crop 8x10 to 8x8, it goes a long way to fixing the falloff problem with the 120 SA on 8x10. Not all the way, but maybe enough that fixing it with a center filter becomes much less pressing a concern.

Bernice Loui
2-May-2018, 10:31
Actual image area of 8x10 film, about 7.75" x 9.75" or closer to the 150mm focal length than 120mm focal length.
Similar to 60mm x 60mm (6x6) actual image area of 56mm x 56mm.

Ends up with a 7.75" square image area on 8x10 sheet film (which is slightly smaller than 8x10).

120mm focal length on 8x10 IS a really wide angle of view.


Bernice

ScottPhotoCo
2-May-2018, 11:24
I know that you said that you're looking for 8x10 but what do you hope to gain with 8x10 over say 4x5 or 5x7? Unless you plan to print REALLY large you likely won't see much of a difference in quality at standard print sizes up to 16x20 (in my experience).

For what you are describing as your process you may want to consider a Graflex SLR. It will allow a larger film size (4x5, 5x7) and can be hand held and is also quicker to set and shoot which in my experience helps capture moments that the time to set up a full field camera wouldn't easily allow. You can use a variety of lenses to suit your subject and the results can be stunning.

Another benefit is that most people have never seen a camera like this and are fascinated by it and therefore more willing to take the time to work with you. Again, just my experience.

I will post some images as soon as I get back to my computer for your reference.

Tim

Armin Seeholzer
2-May-2018, 12:03
Toyo 810M if you can handle the weight; it sets up in seconds and is precise and smooth in operation.
It can be used in the rain, snow or heat with no adverse effects on function.

Would also vote for the Toyo, because it need a long extention for portraits!

Robert Opheim
2-May-2018, 17:27
Joe I can see by your images that you posted and your credentials that you already are an accomplished photographer. I use a very basic but very sturdy Calumet C-1 8x10 - its heavy - but it doesn't move. The Kodak Clam-shell masterview is nicer, there are a number of lighter/ newer bed cameras that are wonderful. The nature for me of 8x10 as quite slow in set up and shooting so speed doesn't matter. I would look at what qualities you want in an 8x10 camera and what attachments, accessories and lenses. I broke the front standard on an old wood 8x10 with a 12 inch Wollensak Velostigmat II lens -the lens was too heavy. Best wishes for you search - I would enjoy seeing your images!

joedgaia
2-May-2018, 17:56
Hey Robert..it's more about a deep dive into craft for me. There's something about the setting up of the view camera that acts as a prelude to the photograph that engages the subject. Also, as you know there's a look with wide aperture. It's not costing me very much right now other than time. I'll start with the 159 Wollensak and see how that feels. I should have the B&J put together by the end of the week so I'll post pix.
Here's a USMC vet I met on the beach taken with an M7 and a 90 Summichron that might be interesting with an 8x10 cam:
177862

Daniel Casper Lohenstein
5-May-2018, 09:47
Hello Joe,

great project. First I thought you're crazy.

But now I think such a device would be the natural center of a developing exchange about art and photography.

You will meet interesting people.

What about DIY?

You will do macros when taking photographs in the street.

So you have to close focus. To position your subject in a defined distance from the lens you need a cord, and you don't disappear behind a focus cloth.

Now, given the exact length of a macro extension, you will have an exact amount of additional exposure that is calculated a priori, e.g. 2 addtional stops.

So you will not have to calculate around in stressing situations. You don't have to focus at all because your camera is already focused eg. at 5ft or 15ft.

When using a flash you will have predefined depth of field like Weegee and fast exposures, too. Given a 210mm lens with 8x10 film and an object distance of 5m, you will have a dof of 4-7m with f32, with an extension of 9.2mm added to the flange focal distance of the 210 lens. See http://www.erik-krause.de/schaerfe.htm#top There are several Fujinons around, e.g. http://www.subclub.org/fujinon/byfl.htm: the Fujinon NW 5.6/210mm with a flange focal distance of 204.4mm, so your camera body will have a thickness of circa 204.5 + 9.2 mm.

You could use birch plywood 18mm thickness, you don't need a ground glass, just add some rails to put the holder in. If somebody feels offended, you will not lose to much equipment. Only some wood für circa 5$ and a lens and a holder. But you can use it as a supporting device for your discussion ...

If you intend to use your Fujinon SWS 8/120, you build another body. Or better: build one part for the lens, one for the filmholder and one or two extension bodies for your different fix-focused lenses. They have to fit between the lens and the filmholder parts, giving defined focus.

This would be a great kickstarter with cameras and system extension costing around 25$.

Regards Daniel

mdarnton
5-May-2018, 10:07
Contrary to my above post re the use of a Hobo-type camera...an aspect of photographing folks with an LF camera is the "sense of occasion" which this can bring - that even when the subject is not known (or well known) by the photographer, the presence of something like an 8x10 drop-bed or monorail camera and the ritual that setting up and making an image entails...can communicate to the subject a sense of importance and respect, as well as giving the subject an additional roll of collaborator. Just a thought!
Yes! I totally milk this for all it's worth when shooting portraits. I learned this from the portrait photographer I worked for in high school who shot with an 8x10 camera for its impact, but was actually using split 5x7 around behind where no one would know.