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Greg
14-Mar-2018, 16:09
Most of the time when shooting with my 11x14, it is from the back of my SUV on the side of the road. Trunk open and camera set up not all that far from the vehicle. If able to pull completely off the road, never a problem. Town roads here in New England, never a problem. But if I am parked on the side of a main (with Route#) road, several times Police have stopped and politely I was told to pack it up and move on... with the clear implication of doing that RIGHT NOW! A real bummer when one spends 20+ minutes setting up the shot and then are told to move on "now". Talked with our local Police and they recommended that I place a red cone behind the driver's side of the vehicle. So I heeded their advice for the past year, and boy does it work.... patrol cars now just drive by me. Sometimes they slow down and wave!

domaz
14-Mar-2018, 16:21
Good idea. Sometimes all it takes is looking "official". Put on a high visibility vest and you may get even less attention, someone might figure you are a surveyor, just doing your job.

faberryman
14-Mar-2018, 16:31
Good idea. Sometimes all it takes is looking "official". Put on a high visibility vest and you may get even less attention, someone might figure you are a surveyor, just doing your job.

Good advice. Maybe have your wife out there with a vest and a Slow sign on a pole too.

Greg
14-Mar-2018, 16:43
Good idea. Sometimes all it takes is looking "official". Put on a high visibility vest and you may get even less attention, someone might figure you are a surveyor, just doing your job.

Great comment, will absolutely the next time I'm out there by the side of the road wear my vest which I actually always carry in the car.
thanks.

Leszek Vogt
14-Mar-2018, 17:59
Ha ha ha, I kind of had to chuckle at your experience in contrast with AK. There are still many spots where you'll photograph for over 30 min. and no cars might drive by. There were several occasions when I saw no police for over a week. Anyway, it's still the last frontier.

To underline the lack of traffic, I'd like to share this small story. I was driving a motorcoach with tourists around Lake Kluane (Yukon) on the way to Skagway. At one point a view of the lake/beach opened up and I noticed a mama bear and an offspring in the water chewing on the twig. By the time it crystallized what I saw, I drove behind this hill - totally obscuring the view. Well, I backed it up to the original spot and sat there for about 5 min. till everyone aboard had a chance to take a pic (including me :>). I'm not familiar with anyplace (except Antarctica, perhaps) that one could pull this off without some massive consequences.

Les

Willie
14-Mar-2018, 19:12
Good advice. Maybe have your wife out there with a vest and a Slow sign on a pole too.

Put two shovels into the ground sticking up near a flaggers pole and you can probably stay parked for a week.

AJ Edmondson
14-Mar-2018, 19:21
Never work around here!!! Unless there are at least five guys standing around watching there is no way you will make anyone believe it is a work crew.

j.e.simmons
15-Mar-2018, 02:56
I’ve found that a cone and a safety vest let me get away with a lot. I used to carry a clipboard, but I now find that my iPad loaded with Expodev for exposure calculations works just as well.

pepeguitarra
15-Mar-2018, 10:51
Never work around here!!! Unless there are at least five guys standing around watching there is no way you will make anyone believe it is a work crew.

A public employee work crew!! (..standing and watching!!). Very funny.

Vaughn
15-Mar-2018, 11:03
A public employee work crew!! (..standing and watching!!). Very funny.
My dad had to go in front of the LA Board of Supervisors to defend one of his men. Some powerful asshole had seen the worker standing along the street leaning on his shovel and wanted him fired. The police had told the workers not to start work until rush hour traffic finished. The board then passes a rule saying Superintendents could not come before the Board to defend their workers anymore. My dad was happy to retire after 30 years at 56.

But I worked for the feds on a 'work crew' for ten seasons. We had fun, but we worked our butts off.

Jmarmck
15-Mar-2018, 12:41
I think it is a matter of getting not only all the way off the pavement but also off the shoulder. I seem to have read/heard that somewhere.

For years I have told myself, "Self, do not slam on those brakes to get that shot. The ditch is just not worth the encounter." Yes, I still have to tell myself this. I almost dropped the nose of the truck off into a culvert outside Farmington, NM. It is hard to remember that by the time I got off the road I had already passed the viewpoint that caught my attention. If weather or rapidly waning or waxing light were involved it was already too late. It is hard to talk one's self out of such foolishness.

The cone is a grand idea.

Eric Woodbury
15-Mar-2018, 13:11
A friend of mine photo'd the freeways and interstate interchanges in downtown LA. Talk about a lot of cars. You are suppose to get a permit and rent a highway patrolman. Instead, my friend used a white pickup truck with yellow flashing lights on top. Orange cones. Orange vest. "Survey Crew" sign. Worked.

Drew Wiley
15-Mar-2018, 17:06
Depends on the road. Never dirt roads - too much dust risk if someone does drive by. Never without safe turnout space. And now around here, drunks aren't the only ones swerving with deadly results. Statistically, cell phone distraction and legalized pot are now even worse. When in doubt, I shoot quickie MF gear.

tgtaylor
15-Mar-2018, 20:37
A few years back I photographed a spectacular grand landscape in Santa Clara County that could only be accessed from a steep winding mountain road where parking anywhere was illegal. At the time I was driving a '02 Toyota Echo which is a small but surprisingly roomy compact and finally came upon a spot a quarter of a mile or so (downhill of course) where I could just get the car off the asphalt (illegally) and hurried back uphill to jump the fence (trespassing on county property prohibited) where a machete would have been handy. I got a great shot with a Toyo 45cf (I wasn't shooting 8x10 back then) and the car was still there when I got back with no tickets on it. Contrast this with a trespassing ticket I got a few years earlier while photographing a reservoir in San Mateo county. When I got back to the car I found the San Mateo County Sheriff waiting who detained me until the San Francisco water board cop, sweating bullets looking for me, got back and issued me a citation. I had to go court on this one and the assigned judge (the traffic court commissioner but now part of the superior court when the municipal and superior court systems merged in California) had been trying to get me to appear on an old no proof of insurance ticket from years earlier. When I went to pay that ticket the court clerk handed me a dismissal instead so I ignored the judge's later attempts to get me to appear because he wouldn't have jurisdiction unless I entered an appearance. So I was fully resigned to him making up for that earlier bobo and throw the book at me for the trespassing and he called my name with a relish. But during the trial the county sheriff deputies testified that if it was up to them they wouldn't have issued a citation and I saw that the judge was looking at them when they made that statement and silently nodded in agreement. I ended up paying a fine - the minimal, the judge made pains to stress, allowable under the law.

Thomas

Drew Wiley
16-Mar-2018, 12:02
Jumping fences is a good way to get shot. Last wk I pulled over in a very safe per traffic spot on a barely used road. But the locals deliberately left big holes in the fences so their vicious dogs could get out, which they instantly did. Don't blame them. Lowlifes are increasingly using country roads to dump truckloads of trash and unwanted furniture. But I moved on and got nice shots anyway.

Vaughn
16-Mar-2018, 12:24
I greatly dislike looking for images while driving. Finding areas to get out and walk around for a several hours, yes.

Now if I had a driver like Charis, and traffic was non-exisistant (could stop in the middle of the road for an hour), then I might change my mind. Oh, and a Guggy would be nice, too.

Drew Wiley
16-Mar-2018, 12:46
I prefer hiking for shots. But on road trips to and from such destinations, I'll pick the windiest quietest roads possible. But I grew up around ranchers whose favorite fence sign was, No Trespassing, Survivors will be Prosecuted - and they meant it! Now the proliferation of narco ag, esp illegally on public land, is just one more reason to be thoughtful. But every time I try to slip out this week, it starts raining like crazy. Did print some nice roadside shots yesterday, ironically including one of dumped junk. My main worry when taking it was having someone suspect me of dumping stuff too. So I made sure the camera tripod was obvious.

Serge S
28-Mar-2018, 12:38
A cone is a great idea...although I think I will avoid roadsides.
Last summer I was in northern Maine photographing on a very quiet road, as spot near a farm I had visited the previous day.
I spent maybe an hour there, setting up a couple of shots.
A lady pulled over and told me quite forcefully that I should move, she was probably right in saying so as she warned me a few accidents had occurred recently on that road.
She told me logging trucks had crashed into a few Amish Wagons and I could be the next fatality.
I think only two cars went by in that hour I was there, but I did not feel as comfortable being there as before:)
Safety is definitely a concern with distracted drivers on the road today.
I would have never thought the road I was on was dangerous as so few cars were present.


I think it is a matter of getting not only all the way off the pavement but also off the shoulder. I seem to have read/heard that somewhere.

For years I have told myself, "Self, do not slam on those brakes to get that shot. The ditch is just not worth the encounter." Yes, I still have to tell myself this. I almost dropped the nose of the truck off into a culvert outside Farmington, NM. It is hard to remember that by the time I got off the road I had already passed the viewpoint that caught my attention. If weather or rapidly waning or waxing light were involved it was already too late. It is hard to talk one's self out of such foolishness.

The cone is a grand idea.

jp
28-Mar-2018, 12:49
Safety is definitely a concern with distracted drivers on the road today.
I would have never thought the road I was on was dangerous as so few cars were present.

In rural Maine, people drive like they don't expect anyone else on the road because there is generally empty road. Distracted driving has made it worse.

I'd love to be able to park anywhere, but in the winter there is often no shoulder to park on because of snowbanks. And where we do park, we want to make sure it's not a surprise to drivers coming over a little hill or corner.

Two23
28-Mar-2018, 16:09
I generally wear a yellow safety vest when alongside a road. (I photo trains at night.) It does seem to keep me safer, plus passers-by no longer call me in to the police. They think I work for the railroad.:)


Kent in SD

Greg
28-Mar-2018, 16:22
but in the winter there is often no shoulder to park on because of snowbanks. And where we do park, we want to make sure it's not a surprise to drivers coming over a little hill or corner.

In the 1970s I was a student at RIT in Rochester, NY. On weekends I would find gorges which were frozen over to hike up with my 8x10 on my back and tripod over the shoulder. Sides of roads were always covered with snowbanks. My method of parking on the side of the road was to get out and shovel the snowbank as best I could. Then "Banzai" my '68 VW Beetle into the space that I had partially shoveled out. 9 out of 10 times my Bug was off the road. When I returned to the car later in the day, half of the time I was able to get out by just backing up. Other half of the time, just took me a few minutes to shovel enough of snow to again back up. Snow plows never plowed me in, and twice they plowed out the snow in front of the Beetle.