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durr3
8-Feb-2018, 07:01
I want to find a nice Linhof 4x5, but do not know which model to search for. Anybody have experience with them?
Which model, which lenses, etc.
Thanks

Pfsor
8-Feb-2018, 07:51
Have you tried Linhof website?

Jac@stafford.net
8-Feb-2018, 08:14
Is money no object?

durr3
8-Feb-2018, 08:21
Money is always an object. It is directly related to quantity and quality.

Greg
8-Feb-2018, 08:37
Availability of replacement/spare parts I think the major deciding point. Years ago once bought a circa 1950s 5x7 Linhof that was in mint condition but missing one part that made it unusable (as it was). OEM Linhof replacement part was unavailable and price for fabrication of a replacement part more than what I paid for the camera. Ended up selling the camera as a "parts camera". Maybe Bob could address as to the availability of OEM Linhof parts?

Willie
8-Feb-2018, 08:48
Buy the newest model you can afford.
All are good. Newer models have some features the older models do not.

JMO
8-Feb-2018, 13:13
Buy the newest model you can afford.
All are good. Newer models have some features the older models do not.


Willie gives good advice. I have been using (second owner) a Master Technika Classic model that was made in the mid-80s for several years now, and believe it has most of the movements and features that one needs for landscape work in the field. It has proved rugged and reliable, and sets up and takes down pretty quickly once you get used to handling it. As for lens choices, there are a variety of threads on this Forum with comments and guidance for preferred 1, 2, 3, or more lens line-ups (based on focal lengths) that may help you, and there are some helpful reviews under the "Lenses" section of the LF Forum. In addition to your Post #4 with its observation about price/quality, there are various other considerations for any given focal length such as their weight (for those who will backpack), image circle (to allow generous movements if you'll need), glass element coatings (multi- or none) and other design characteristics. I think it makes sense to try to avoid repeat purchases within any given focal length range(s) you decide to include in your kit, or line-up, so advise you to take your time and do careful research here on this Forum to make your choices. I've studied, and mostly followed, the "Future Classics" or "Good" lens listings for 4x5 at http://www.thalmann.com/largeformat/future.htm AND http://www.angusparkerphoto.com/blog/2016/3/good-lenses-for-a-4x5-view-camera. Enjoy...

Bob Salomon
8-Feb-2018, 14:07
Willie gives good advice. I have been using (second owner) a Master Technika Classic model that was made in the mid-80s for several years now, and believe it has most of the movements and features that one needs for landscape work in the field. It has proved rugged and reliable, and sets up and takes down pretty quickly once you get used to handling it. As for lens choices, there are a variety of threads on this Forum with comments and guidance for preferred 1, 2, 3, or more lens line-ups (based on focal lengths) that may help you, and there are some helpful reviews under the "Lenses" section of the LF Forum. In addition to your Post #4 with its observation about price/quality, there are various other considerations for any given focal length such as their weight (for those who will backpack), image circle (to allow generous movements if you'll need), glass element coatings (multi- or none) and other design characteristics. I think it makes sense to try to avoid repeat purchases within any given focal length range(s) you decide to include in your kit, or line-up, so advise you to take your time and do careful research here on this Forum to make your choices. I've studied, and mostly followed, the "Future Classics" or "Good" lens listings for 4x5 at http://www.thalmann.com/largeformat/future.htm AND http://www.angusparkerphoto.com/blog/2016/3/good-lenses-for-a-4x5-view-camera. Enjoy...

This is pretty good advice, but it leaves out the most important things to consider:
1: do you want or need to work with a rangefinder? If so, you canít beat the Master Technika, now named Master Technika Classic. Just be aware, lenses from 65mm to 360 can have cams cut for the rangefinder and the rf will not work with camera movements.
2: is extreme WA desired? Then you forgo the rf feature and go with the Master Technika 2000 or its replacement the 3000.

Jac@stafford.net
8-Feb-2018, 14:57
I waited until Bob Solomon contributed. Read his suggestions twice. It's good stuff.

I add that a Super Technika V can be a very good buy, depending upon condition, of course. If you plan to use the rangefinder, then personally I would not buy any earlier than a V. Read up on what lenses and cams are compatible (not so many) and how to contract compatible cams to be made.

If you are NOT planning to use the rangefinder, then IMHO the huge advantage of a Super Technika is lost and you may just as well get a much less expensive 'clam shell' field camera.

Ivan J. Eberle
8-Feb-2018, 18:47
It will put pricing matters into better perspective to go to EBay "Advanced" to see the sheer numbers of Linhof cameras offered for sale, versus the ones that actually sell and what they sold for.

JMO
8-Feb-2018, 18:59
Just a short additional note to my Post at #7 above, and further to Mr. Salomon's comments (whose info and opinions about anything Linhof should be considered definitive). My Master Technika Classic kit came with 3 lenses that included unique rangefinder keys, but (I confess) the few times I tried to use those lenses with my MT Classic's rangefinder I was underwhelmed by the experience. This, even though my 35mm Leica M and MF Mamiya 7ii cameras both rely on rangefinders for focusing. My several years of experience using my MT Classic has been with lenses spanning 75mm to the Fujinon 600T (which requires 39cm bellows draw for subjects at infinity), and using a focusing loupe on the ground glass to be sure everything is in proper focus while necessary lens movements are applied (sometimes significant). For my LF landscape photography I don't know why or when I would need to rely on the rangefinder feature of the Linhof MT Classic - but each to his/her own if it will help.

mdarnton
9-Feb-2018, 05:23
Interesting that people assume that what's being asked is about the Technika series. When I think of the wonderful cameras I've used, the Bi comes to the top of my list, and the one I would buy if I had all the money in the world would be the Technikardan, not one of the pressish cameras.

Bob Salomon
9-Feb-2018, 06:17
Interesting that people assume that what's being asked is about the Technika series. When I think of the wonderful cameras I've used, the Bi comes to the top of my list, and the one I would buy if I had all the money in the world would be the Technikardan, not one of the pressish cameras.

My choice would also be the TKS for most work, especially outdoors or architecture. But most people had commented on the Technika and the OP never indicated that that was not what he wanted.

NorbertNL
9-Feb-2018, 06:26
When using a Technika (my own experience is a 2003-built MTC), an additional aspect is that a number of the smaller lenses between 120mm and 150mm focal lengths ([Apo-]Symmar as well as [Apo-]Sironar N or S) can remain attached to the camera when folded. This makes a Technika & 'normal' or moderate wideangle lens a very compact (yet not a lightweight) package. I second (third, that is ...) that Technikardan may be worth a thought, too. A bit less compact than a Technika, it has extended movements while being less bulky and (un-)folding quicker than a rail camera.

DrTang
9-Feb-2018, 09:58
Bob will blow a gasket..but I love the tech III... it's smaller, cheaper and even though parts are not available.. buy one that works..they are built like a tank and unless you dropkick it off a cliff..it will outlive you

of course I never use the rangefinder - so matching cams are not an issue

Corran
9-Feb-2018, 10:48
Most everything has been said but allow to chime in. You need to define what it is you are looking for.

If you just plan to shoot in a studio environment, a good monorail will be all you really need, and so leaving aside the Technika you should compare the commonly available ones and the Linhof models to see what you want.

If you are looking for a field camera to pack and take on the trail, the Linhof Technika will have a massive weight penalty compared to any wooden camera for the slight increase in rigidity and precision. When I bought my Master I thought I would sell my Chamonix but after hoofing it around a bit, I absolutely did not and rarely take the Technika out on the trail unless I have a good reason.

The Technika series is the only LF camera that can readily use multiple lenses with its rangefinder quickly, easily, and accurately. You do have to use separate RF and VF so it's not quite as intuitive or quick as a modern Leica but it's still pretty easy to use, along with the newer Linhof VF as long as you are meticulous about the parallax control. In my experience, having bought and used Technika III, IV, V, and Master cameras, it is easiest and cheapest to find a camera set with the lenses you want to use with the RF at the get-go, rather than sending things out to get calibrated later. Piecing together a kit can be hard.

As alluded earlier, technically only the Tech V and later can interchange RF cams, but sometimes you get lucky. The cam for my 75mm Biogon is for a different lens and from a Tech IV but works fine on my lens on my Master, but there's a bit more tolerance with a wide-angle.

There's nothing quite like a Technika but if you really don't "need" the capabilities, I wouldn't bother.

Bernice Loui
9-Feb-2018, 11:41
+10.

If the range finder feature is not needed, there are few real world user reasons for a Technika. Having previously owned the V and Master in 4x5 then a 5x7-13-18cm V, there is little to recommend them unless the range finder feature is really needed. If a lens needs to be cammed to the given Technica range finder, it is highly speciality work for the cam to track over the entire focus range and match the specific lens. This is why if one really wants a system like this, purchase the Technica system with matching lenses and cams for that specific Technica.

Using really wide angle lenses is a hassle as the bed needs to be dropped and if the focal length is really short the wide angle focusing device must be used, adding to this camera movement is extremely limited.

Build quality is a good, but in many ways should not be the deciding factor as the camera's ability to provide movement and ability to accommodate a broad variety of optics is often far more important then instrument precision build. Due to the precise nature of the ways and focusing mechanism, they can develop problems with dirt and stuff getting caught in these precision mechanisms.... a problem wood and mindfully constructed metal field cameras can avoid.

As previously mentioned, best to figure out the kind of images to be created, then choose the camera-optics system as needed.


Bernice





Most everything has been said but allow to chime in. You need to define what it is you are looking for.

If you just plan to shoot in a studio environment, a good monorail will be all you really need, and so leaving aside the Technika you should compare the commonly available ones and the Linhof models to see what you want.

If you are looking for a field camera to pack and take on the trail, the Linhof Technika will have a massive weight penalty compared to any wooden camera for the slight increase in rigidity and precision. When I bought my Master I thought I would sell my Chamonix but after hoofing it around a bit, I absolutely did not and rarely take the Technika out on the trail unless I have a good reason.

The Technika series is the only LF camera that can readily use multiple lenses with its rangefinder quickly, easily, and accurately. You do have to use separate RF and VF so it's not quite as intuitive or quick as a modern Leica but it's still pretty easy to use, along with the newer Linhof VF as long as you are meticulous about the parallax control. In my experience, having bought and used Technika III, IV, V, and Master cameras, it is easiest and cheapest to find a camera set with the lenses you want to use with the RF at the get-go, rather than sending things out to get calibrated later. Piecing together a kit can be hard.

As alluded earlier, technically only the Tech V and later can interchange RF cams, but sometimes you get lucky. The cam for my 75mm Biogon is for a different lens and from a Tech IV but works fine on my lens on my Master, but there's a bit more tolerance with a wide-angle.

There's nothing quite like a Technika but if you really don't "need" the capabilities, I wouldn't bother.

Bernice Loui
9-Feb-2018, 11:47
Technikardan, been there used this, lacks rigidity. The 4x5 version is the problem offering, the 2x3-6x9 is good in this aspect.

IMO, over priced for what it has to offer.


Bernice





I would buy if I had all the money in the world would be the Technikardan, not one of the pressish cameras.

Bob Salomon
9-Feb-2018, 12:35
+10.

If the range finder feature is not needed, there are few real world user reasons for a Technika. Having previously owned the V and Master in 4x5 then a 5x7-13-18cm V, there is little to recommend them unless the range finder feature is really needed. If a lens needs to be cammed to the given Technica range finder, it is highly speciality work for the cam to track over the entire focus range and match the specific lens. This is why if one really wants a system like this, purchase the Technica system with matching lenses and cams for that specific Technica.

Using really wide angle lenses is a hassle as the bed needs to be dropped and if the focal length is really short the wide angle focusing device must be used, adding to this camera movement is extremely limited.

Build quality is a good, but in many ways should not be the deciding factor as the camera's ability to provide movement and ability to accommodate a broad variety of optics is often far more important then instrument precision build. Due to the precise nature of the ways and focusing mechanism, they can develop problems with dirt and stuff getting caught in these precision mechanisms.... a problem wood and mindfully constructed metal field cameras can avoid.

As previously mentioned, best to figure out the kind of images to be created, then choose the camera-optics system as needed.


Bernice

Bernice, times have changed, several years ago, with the introduction of the Master Technika 2000 and its replacement, the 3000. These models have no rangefinder and instead have a built in extreme wide angle focusing system inside the camera housing. They easily handle lenses down to 45mm simply by mounting them on the proper board.the 2000 has a focus lever for the inside lenses mounted above the front standard when it is in the camera body. The 3000 has a focus knob on the bottom right side of the body.
With the 3000 there is an additional drop bed position to 90 degrees to make sure the bed is not in the picture. This additional stop position can be added to all 2000 and most MT cameras by the service center. So the 2000 and 3000 probably take the widest range of lenses of any 45 with the same bellows!
Additionally the Wide Angle Focus Device has been out of production for many years. In its place Linhof now supplies lensboards with helical focusing mounts with focus and DOF scales for lenses from 65 to 45mm for the Master Technika and earlier rangefinder models back to the IV.

Bob Salomon
9-Feb-2018, 12:38
Bob will blow a gasket..but I love the tech III... it's smaller, cheaper and even though parts are not available.. buy one that works..they are built like a tank and unless you dropkick it off a cliff..it will outlive you

of course I never use the rangefinder - so matching cams are not an issue

Cams may not be an issue but lack of front tilt on the front standard, probably the single most used movement on a view camera, on the front standard certainly is! The III on had backward tilt on the front standard.
This means that if you need front tilt you have to tilt the bed. That means that the camera will then dictate the camera position. Rather then allowing the photographer to!

LabRat
9-Feb-2018, 13:04
Bob will blow a gasket..but I love the tech III... it's smaller, cheaper and even though parts are not available.. buy one that works..they are built like a tank and unless you dropkick it off a cliff..it will outlive you

of course I never use the rangefinder - so matching cams are not an issue

I agree and live it!!! :-)

An early older camera has no plastic parts to break (metal on metal sliding parts), but some downsides...

First, the older cameras will need a new set of bellows sooner or later, but not super expensive for bels/installation, and then a non-issue for many years to come...

The later cameras have provisions for more lens and other options, but the basic options should be most all you need...

Earlier cameras have provisions for different movements, but was improved over the years, so the movements available are (mostly) there, but the range is limited (but slightly expanded over the years)...

Specialized Linhof parts are expensive, but can usually be found used for more/less affordable $$$, so you find what you need...

But a big thing to remember is that this type of camera has basically evolved from a press camera (with movements added), but if a beginner did not learn from a full movement monorail or some other type, you can't just try this or that movement without knowing exactly what you are trying to do, as the movement settings are not plainly visibly/operative (unless you know what movement is needed, and know the "secret" of how to set them), so not a camera type for beginners...

There's also good offerings from Horseman/Toyo/Wista etc and more, so there are choices beyond, but the Tek is tough as a tank, and doesn't notice hard use at all...

Steve K

Bob Salomon
9-Feb-2018, 13:16
I agree and live it!!! :-)

An early older camera has no plastic parts to break (metal on metal sliding parts), but some downsides...

First, the older cameras will need a new set of bellows sooner or later, but not super expensive for bels/installation, and then a non-issue for many years to come...

The later cameras have provisions for more lens and other options, but the basic options should be most all you need...

Earlier cameras have provisions for different movements, but was improved over the years, so the movements available are (mostly) there, but the range is limited (but slightly expanded over the years)...

Specialized Linhof parts are expensive, but can usually be found used for more/less affordable $$$, so you find what you need...

But a big thing to remember is that this type of camera has basically evolved from a press camera (with movements added), but if a beginner did not learn from a full movement monorail or some other type, you can't just try this or that movement without knowing exactly what you are trying to do, as the movement settings are not plainly visibly/operative (unless you know what movement is needed, and know the "secret" of how to set them), so not a camera type for beginners...

There's also good offerings from Horseman/Toyo/Wista etc and more, so there are choices beyond, but the Tek is tough as a tank, and doesn't notice hard use at all...

Steve K

Steve, the Technika did not evolve from a press camera. Valentin Linhof and Nicholas Karpf developed the first all metal camera with a swing back and that is what was the basis of the Technika.

Jac@stafford.net
9-Feb-2018, 14:16
... the Technika did not evolve from a press camera. Valentin Linhof and Nicholas Karpf developed the first all metal camera with a swing back and that is what was the basis of the Technika.

Bingo - a historical marker, a milestone regarding the development of the Technika! Thanks, Bob.

Aside to an earlier post denigrating the use of the rangefinder (RF) in the Super Technika, I submit that the RF in any case offers a good starting point and I know that a lot of large format people use none to little perspective controls. (This opens the occasion for the 1% real perspective controllers to protest but be drowned out by the keyboard artists.)

LabRat
9-Feb-2018, 14:32
Steve, the Technika did not evolve from a press camera. Valentin Linhof and Nicholas Karpf developed the first all metal camera with a swing back and that is what was the basis of the Technika.

If you look at pre-war Linhofs, you see that they were based on Euro cameras of the era (thin alum bodies with leather coverings) and standard Euro press cameras were much different than our American based Graflex designs, but post-war (with all the occupation GIs and journalists around), they had to notice the design of these that were easy to use handheld, had provisions to change lenses, but also use some movements when on a tripod (when needed), and you see the great effort they made to first build an RF system that would mate to different FL's, big grip, and an much improved VF that would appeal to press photographers, but could expand to a "technical" (Technika???) configuration...

But I think the resemblance to a Graphic is no coincidence...

My guess, of course...

Cheers,

Steve K

Bob Salomon
9-Feb-2018, 14:36
If you look at pre-war Linhofs, you see that they were based on Euro cameras of the era (thin alum bodies with leather coverings) and standard Euro press cameras were much different than our American based Graflex designs, but post-war (with all the occupation GIs and journalists around), they had to notice the design of these that were easy to use handheld, had provisions to change lenses, but also use some movements when on a tripod (when needed), and you see the great effort they made to first build an RF system that would mate to different FL's, big grip, and an much improved VF that would appeal to press photographers, but could expand to a "technical" (Technika???) configuration...

But I think the resemblance to a Graphic is no coincidence...

My guess, of course...

Cheers,

Steve K

Go to the Linhof site and see what they say about the origins. And look at a copy of The Linhof Camera Story book for a definitive history.

Then go look at the Linhof Medcin series of cameras that were made before the end of the war and you will see that the post war Technika did not evolve from Graflex cameras at all.
It was not until after WW II that Linhof made the Technika Standard, a press camera, for the US market. That was well into the 50s.

Jac@stafford.net
9-Feb-2018, 14:45
With regards to press cameras with movements, I think the end of them is clear as evinced by the failure of the economical Printex 4x5 with rangefinder. It was certainly not the lack of perspective controls that put it away, but due to the more economical smaller, then 'miniature' formats which was when I entered the press photo field.

For the market, a lot of consumers purchase thinking they will use advertised features, perspective controls for example. It bolsters their self opinion, then they never use the features - kinda like home computers today.

Google printex 4x5 camera

I have a lot of them in storage. :(

LabRat
9-Feb-2018, 15:05
Go to the Linhof site and see what they say about the origins. And look at a copy of The Linhof Camera Story book for a definitive history.

Then go look at the Linhof Medcin series of cameras that were made before the end of the war and you will see that the post war Technika did not evolve from Graflex cameras at all.
It was not until after WW II that Linhof made the Technika Standard, a press camera, for the US market. That was well into the 50s.

I'll check that out, should be very interesting...

But my early III is from (?) '51 or '52, and has all the features a press photographer could want (except weight), so I'm thinking that was about a normal product development cycle, and aimed to a specific market, so makes sense to me...

And certainly tough enough after seeing all of those Graphics that survived the war, and still shooting, they made these "bulletproof"...

Steve K

Bob Salomon
9-Feb-2018, 15:12
With regards to press cameras with movements, I think the end of them is clear as evinced by the failure of the economical Printex 4x5 with rangefinder. It was certainly not the lack of perspective controls that put it away, but due to the more economical smaller, then 'miniature' formats which was when I entered the press photo field.

For the market, a lot of consumers purchase thinking they will use advertised features, perspective controls for example. It bolsters their self opinion, then they never use the features - kinda like home computers today.

Google printex 4x5 camera

I have a lot of them in storage. :(
The Printex is from the immediate post war period. Press cameras were going well after that. Witness the picture of Jackie Robinson stealing home or all those ringside photographers into the 60s or Daily News photographers into the 60s. In fact my brother and I were pictured on the front page of the Daily News standing over the body of a murderer on Long Ridge Rd in Stamford. That picture was taken with a press camera also.

Jac@stafford.net
9-Feb-2018, 15:13
The Printex is from the immediate post war period. Press cameras were going well after that. Witness the picture of Jackie Robinson stealing home or all those ringside photographers into the 60s or Daily News photographers into the 60s. In fact my brother and I were pictured on the front page of the Daily News standing over the body of a murderer on Long Ridge Rd in Stamford. That picture was taken with a press camera also.

Did the photographer use perspective movements? I think not.

Bob Salomon
9-Feb-2018, 15:59
Did the photographer use perspective movements? I think not.

It was late at night, hand held, freezing cold, deep in snow and only a flash was used.

Duolab123
9-Feb-2018, 16:14
I still prefer a Crown Graphic with a top rangefinder (Not the all metal Super Duper final model) for handheld "Press" type work. I never change the 135mm Xenar, RF is great. I have a lowly Linhof "Color" 4x5 viewcamera from the 60's that I use to play around with in my studio room. The binocular reflex viewer is cool. I have tried two times to fall in love with the Technika, beautiful in every way but weight. If I won the lottery I would fly to Munich and order two of everything Linhof could make for me :o Best Regards, Mike

Bob Salomon
9-Feb-2018, 16:32
I still prefer a Crown Graphic with a top rangefinder (Not the all metal Super Duper final model) for handheld "Press" type work. I never change the 135mm Xenar, RF is great. I have a lowly Linhof "Color" 4x5 viewcamera from the 60's that I use to play around with in my studio room. The binocular reflex viewer is cool. I have tried two times to fall in love with the Technika, beautiful in every way but weight. If I won the lottery I would fly to Munich and order two of everything Linhof could make for me :o Best Regards, Mike

Glad you like the binocular reflex viewer but Linhof only made a monocular one. They did, for a while, offer an adapter to mount the Sinar binocular viewer but the whole combination was very clumsy. So it was discontinued.

Greg
9-Feb-2018, 17:22
Glad you like the binocular reflex viewer but Linhof only made a monocular one. They did, for a while, offer an adapter to mount the Sinar binocular viewer but the whole combination was very clumsy. So it was discontinued.

Yes I agree the Sinar Binocular reflex viewer is bulky. That being said, for the longest time used an adapted Arca-Swiss monocular viewer on my Sinar until I borrowed a Sinar Binocular reflex viewer... Bought one ASAP and never looked back. I even looked into getting a custom one made for my Whole Plate Chamonix by a local fabricator, but cost quote was way north of a couple of hundred dollars, so shelved the idea. The Sinar Binocular reflex viewer I deem so important to my composing on the GG, that I put up with its bulkiness.

Jimi
10-Feb-2018, 02:06
I think the OP has posted over on what was formerly known as APUG - and when being prodded with a small stick, admitted that he is looking for a field camera.

durr3
10-Feb-2018, 06:50
Wow, thanks for all the info and advice. I AM looking for a field camera. I have owned a Deardorff, a Toyo 45, a Rittreck, several Graflexes, a couple Wisners, a 1920s Ansco and others.
I have never owned a Linhof and want to try one. Oh and I just got a Chamonix 45.
I shoot mostly people and places. Not a whole lot of landscapes, but a few.
Thanks again
J

Bernice Loui
10-Feb-2018, 09:51
Why not try a Sinar Norma, or other Sinar?
To get a real sense of what a Sinar Norma is like, it must be in prime condition, not a wore out, lubricant dried out, Ill-adjusted beater.


Bernice




I have never owned a Linhof and want to try one. Oh and I just got a Chamonix 45.
I shoot mostly people and places. Not a whole lot of landscapes, but a few.
Thanks again
J

Robert Opheim
10-Feb-2018, 12:53
I bought a Technikardan specifically for architecture. It handles wide angle lenses very well - I have used a 58mm lens without a recessed board. It has a bag bellows as a changeable bellows which allows for a great deal of front and rear movements. In architectural and in landscape I use front rise a lot. There are no provisions for rangefinder focus and framing - all work in done on the ground glass. I currently use lenses from 75mm to 450mm on this camera. You need to think of which camera provides you with the qualities of what you want to do. Also you should access the camera and see if you like the way they operate and feel.

Sal Santamaura
10-Feb-2018, 12:53
...what was formerly known as APUG...It's now PHOTRIO. Why not use the correct name? :)

Jimi
10-Feb-2018, 13:10
Of course I could do that, Sal, but then I would have to wash my mouth with soap. :D

Just kidding, of course. I am a bit set in my ways, that's all. I am still using the apug.org as a shortcut in the few cases I need to access the site.

Jac@stafford.net
10-Feb-2018, 14:24
In my small world, a Field Camera folds in upon itself for compact portability. No rail sticking out to make schlepping a hassle.

A better Field Camera folds in and completely covers the works, including the lens into a shell. The Linhof Super-Technika does that, provided the lens allows folding up. My model V with a 135mm Planar folds securely shut. I'm happy.

Bruce M. Herman
10-Feb-2018, 14:24
I have used a TK45 for over 25 years. The extension slides can be a bit stiff when the air temperature is in the teens or colder, but otherwise I love the camera. Lenses ranged from 75mm to 600mm, the latter being a telephoto.

Daniel Casper Lohenstein
11-Feb-2018, 03:29
Hello,

I worked with a Technika 5x7, but I found it too heavy to carry around. It was the same with a Technika III Mark 5 4x5.

I found the screws of the back tilt to weak. One broke in two pieces. Perhaps it was the lubrification that hardened the thing. I should have it repaired, but this was too expensive. And the bellows had pinholes.

In my opinion a Linhof is worth the money only if you get one of the newest models, perhaps from Linhof in Munich (I myself come from Germany, hehe, so I am a natural admirer of our industries). it is a statement, that you look for worthyness, sturdiness, build quality, and fairly produced things, too - "Deutsche Wertarbeit".

But a new Linhof costs about 5000 €. When used, you pay at least 1000 € to get something a good repair man can service.

What about the Wista 45D and her followers, including a rangefinder version? In my experience they are sturdy too, they're affordable, they're repairable, they have got better bellows than Linhofs, they use Linhof lensboards, they have geared movements, there are a lot of affordable accessoires, and you will be able to spend more money on good lenses ...

I think that in large format photography an accurately working shutter (to do zone system, tolerance between +-0.3 EV) is much more important than the difference in build quality between a Technika and other cameras. This concerns every lens you use, so there are a lot of costs waiting for you. Also filter quality will improve sharpness and contrast more than the material of the camera housing. Same with tripods.

It is the same with e.g. a Leica M2-M6 vs Nikon F2-FM2n. You pay a lot for the brand, the horizontal cloth-shutter of the Leica isn't as good as the vertical aluminium-one of the Nikon, the Nikon is less heavy and less bulky, its lenses are affordable and excelling, the SLR-system is more accurate than the range finder that needs to be adjusted regularly and you spend a lot less money for the Nikon than the Leica.

Unfortunately Nikon never produced 4x5 technical cameras ...

Regards

Mike Lewis
11-Feb-2018, 17:51
In its place Linhof now supplies lensboards with helical focusing mounts with focus and DOF scales for lenses from 65 to 45mm for the Master Technika and earlier rangefinder models back to the IV.

I have a Linhof Super Technika V. So I can use these helical mounts to use 45mm - 65mm lenses on my camera? I didn't realize this. Sorry if I'm asking you to repeat yourself; I just want to make sure.

Renato Tonelli
11-Feb-2018, 18:35
I don't know if this has been asked or stated (thread is getting longish): do you want the Rangefinder? Do you think it will be useful for the type of photography you do? If you don't want or need a Rangefinder, you could save yourself quite a bit of money by buying a Technika IV without the Rangefinder (they also made them with Rangefinders). They turn up once in a while at considerably less.

I have the Master Technika which I really like and have cams for the most often used lenses and... never use the Rangefinder.

Bob Salomon
11-Feb-2018, 19:17
I have a Linhof Super Technika V. So I can use these helical mounts to use 45mm - 65mm lenses on my camera? I didn't realize this. Sorry if I'm asking you to repeat yourself; I just want to make sure.

You need one for each specific lens. Not by focal length. So, for example, there is one for the Rodenstock 65 and a different one for the Schneider 65mm since the flange focal lengths may be different and the depth of field scale is different since they are different speed lenses.

brucetaylor
11-Feb-2018, 21:06
My experience is similar to Renato's, I have a nearly mint IV that does everything I want it to for not a lot of money. I have a cam for the 150mm lens and I use it with the rangefinder sometimes handheld, but I am on the tripod using the groundglass most of the time, so no other cams needed.
I do appreciate the excellent build quality, I am pleased to have and use it.

Jim Andrada
13-Feb-2018, 20:38
I love my Master Technika. I don't think it's too heavy to carry resonable distances. The back tilt take a while to get used to, but it does work. I've never used the rangefinder.

That said, lately I mainly use a 5 x 7 Kodak 2D for sheet film and a Sinar Vario roll film holder in the linhof.