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ndwgolf
18-Jan-2017, 01:19
Question,
I'm new to LF photography but not new to MF film photography (I have a Hasselblad 503CW)
What are the steps involved in cocking the shutter and also opening the shutter for focusing purposes??
Is the triggering of the flash the same as what I do with the Hasselblad?
Any tips tricks that you would like to share with me??
Thanks in advance

Neil

locutus
18-Jan-2017, 03:02
Close with the black tab thingy, cock with the lever. do NOT change shutter speeds after cocking.

Trigger with the PC sync plug, leaf shutter syncs at all speeds.

Huub
18-Jan-2017, 03:17
Depends a bit in which shuttter your lens is.

When in a Copal shutter, follow Locutus' advise. Opening the aparture might be necessary when focussing, as otherwise your screen can be quite dark.

When in a Seiko shutter, the shutter needs to be cocked before they can be opened with a small tab somewhere on the shutter.

I dunno if they were made in Synchro Compur shutters, but these have a slightly different manual also.

locutus
18-Jan-2017, 04:01
I thought the aperture was obvious, no auto stop down here :-)

ndwgolf
18-Jan-2017, 09:12
Close with the black tab thingy, cock with the lever. do NOT change shutter speeds after cocking.

Trigger with the PC sync plug, leaf shutter syncs at all speeds.
Thanks for this
Another question...........how far do I extend the bellow for each lens that I have 90, 150, 210 to start the focusing process??

ndwgolf
18-Jan-2017, 09:12
Depends a bit in which shuttter your lens is.

When in a Copal shutter, follow Locutus' advise. Opening the aparture might be necessary when focussing, as otherwise your screen can be quite dark.

When in a Seiko shutter, the shutter needs to be cocked before they can be opened with a small tab somewhere on the shutter.

I dunno if they were made in Synchro Compur shutters, but these have a slightly different manual also.Cheers mate

locutus
18-Jan-2017, 09:42
Roughly speaking;

Bellows extension for infinity focus is about the focal length of the lens, to focus closer you extend the bellows further.

Dont worry to much about the exact point, its obvious enough on the groundglass.

David Lobato
18-Jan-2017, 09:46
how far do I extend the bellow for each lens that I have 90, 150, 210 to start the focusing process??

For infinity - the same distance as the focal length. For closer, more bellows extension, but typically add less than the focal length to your infinity focus.

Go to this page for a lot more information.
http://www.largeformatphotography.info

Alan9940
18-Jan-2017, 11:18
Don't forget that bellows extension beyond infinity will require an exposure adjustment; that is, more exposure.

ndwgolf
18-Jan-2017, 11:31
You lost me there??

Don't forget that bellows extension beyond infinity will require an exposure adjustment; that is, more exposure.

Bob Salomon
18-Jan-2017, 12:07
You lost me there??

That was not stated correctly. At infinity you have the least amount of bellows extended. Focusing closer then infinity will require more bellows, but no exposure correction unless you extend your bellows far enough to be doing close up or macro exposures. If you are photographing something at half life size you will need to add one stop to your exposure, at life size two stops. You can add that extra exposure by either going to a slower shutter speed or by using a larger aperture or a combination of the two.

Mick Fagan
18-Jan-2017, 19:44
Working on the basis of you having a 150mm lens on your 4x5 camera, this is a rough but reasonably accurate guide of how things work.

You take a picture of a distant mountain, your bellows extension will be roughly at the 150mm mark, give or take. For this, you can use standard light readings and no bellows factor is required. Say the exposure is measured on your light meter at 1/30 @ f22. Set this and take the shot.

Your next shot is of someone standing quite close to the camera, say about 1m away, in exactly the same light as the distant mountain. This may entail you extending the bellows close to 300mm to get correct focus, bellows extension now needs to be done.

Your light reading is the same, 1/30 @ f/22. However your bellows is now at 300mm, meaning your lens is double the distance from the film. You have options to gain the required two stops of light.

You could set the lens and shutter to: 1/8 @ f/22 or, set the lens and shutter to: 1/30 @f/11 or, set the lens and shutter to 1/15 @ f/16.

Whichever way you go, you just need to understand that film requires X amount of light. Your light meter measured the X factor in this instance at 1/30 @ f/22. When you extend the bellows you just need to change the shutter and/or aperture so that the film still gets X amount of light.

Mick.

Mick Fagan
18-Jan-2017, 19:50
Working on the basis of you having a 150mm lens on your 4x5 camera, this is a rough but reasonably accurate guide of how things work.

You take a picture of a distant mountain, your bellows extension will be roughly at the 150mm mark, give or take. For this, you can use standard light readings and no bellows factor is required. Say the exposure is measured on your light meter at 1/30 @ f22. Set this and take the shot.

Your next shot is of someone standing quite close to the camera, say about 1m away, in exactly the same light as the distant mountain. This may entail you extending the bellows close to 300mm to get correct focus, bellows extension now needs to be done.

Your light reading is the same, 1/30 @ f/22. However your bellows is now at 300mm, meaning your lens is double the distance from the film. You have options to gain the required two stops of light.

You could set the lens and shutter to: 1/8 @ f/22 or, set the lens and shutter to: 1/30 @f/11 or, set the lens and shutter to 1/15 @ f/16.

Whichever way you go, you just need to understand that film requires X amount of light. Your light meter measured the X factor in this instance at 1/30 @ f/22. When you extend the bellows you just need to change the shutter and/or aperture so that the film still gets X amount of light.

Mick.

ndwgolf
19-Jan-2017, 01:04
Working on the basis of you having a 150mm lens on your 4x5” camera, this is a rough but reasonably accurate guide of how things work.

You take a picture of a distant mountain, your bellows extension will be roughly at the 150mm mark, give or take. For this, you can use standard light readings and no bellows factor is required. Say the exposure is measured on your light meter at 1/30 @ f22. Set this and take the shot.

Your next shot is of someone standing quite close to the camera, say about 1m away, in exactly the same light as the distant mountain. This may entail you extending the bellows close to 300mm to get correct focus, bellows extension now needs to be done.

Your light reading is the same, 1/30 @ f/22. However your bellows is now at 300mm, meaning your lens is double the distance from the film. You have options to gain the required two stops of light.

You could set the lens and shutter to: 1/8 @ f/22 or, set the lens and shutter to: 1/30 @f/11 or, set the lens and shutter to 1/15 @ f/16.

Whichever way you go, you just need to understand that film requires X amount of light. Your light meter measured the X factor in this instance at 1/30 @ f/22. When you extend the bellows you just need to change the shutter and/or aperture so that the film still gets X amount of light.

Mick.

Fantastic Mick......no longer clear as mud, but crystal clear.........I've got it, thank you very much for taking the time to explain. (I'm an old roughneck so I need it in roughneck terms)

ndwgolf
19-Jan-2017, 01:05
That was not stated correctly. At infinity you have the least amount of bellows extended. Focusing closer then infinity will require more bellows, but no exposure correction unless you extend your bellows far enough to be doing close up or macro exposures. If you are photographing something at half life size you will need to add one stop to your exposure, at life size two stops. You can add that extra exposure by either going to a slower shutter speed or by using a larger aperture or a combination of the two.
Thanks Bob