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John Kasaian
15-Jan-2017, 21:49
Anyone here shoot with it?
Opinions? Suggestions?

I'm curious to see how this film will handle Sierra granite.

Eric Woodbury
15-Jan-2017, 22:06
JK

I've recently started using it. I have a bunch of it in the darkroom waiting to be souped. I took a little in the summer too. I'll see if can get a scan.

I rate it at about 64 ASA, but nothing tested or official. I've been developing normal to normal +2 in XTOL 1:1 (Legacy version). It builds contrast quickly.

LabRat
15-Jan-2017, 22:44
Ortho films I have used will build up contrast quickly... Good to think "spectrally" when using them...

The sky is blue and bright, so that will build the highest density (like the 19th century photos), as well as areas that are illuminated by skylight...

The things that don't build up density quickly are objects that are more towards the red end of the spectrum that don't get so much light...

Look at the color of the rocks, tree bark, ground etc and expect them to stay darker if redder, and other stuff more green/blue might build more density faster, so the choice of ortho might be based on conditions where you normally shoot (and the color environment)...

Testing, testing, testing...

Steve K

Rick A
16-Jan-2017, 06:59
Check out mid to late 19th century western landscape photos if you want to see how true orthochromatic emulsions render the scenes. I found this for you to check out:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2149899/The-American-West-youve-seen-Amazing-19th-century-pictures-landscape-chartered-time.html

John Kasaian
16-Jan-2017, 07:55
Check out mid to late 19th century western landscape photos if you want to see how true orthochromatic emulsions render the scenes. I found this for you to check out:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2149899/The-American-West-youve-seen-Amazing-19th-century-pictures-landscape-chartered-time.html

Cool photos, thanks!
I'll be developing by inspection under a red safe light like I did with ORT-25 back when it was available, so I'm hoping density won't be an issue.
The subjects I'm contemplating shouldn't have any sky in the scene.
I've used D-76 50/50 with distilled water to soup Ort-25 so that's probably going to be where I'll start with the Ilford.

Thanks for the suggestions.

Daniel Unkefer
16-Jan-2017, 08:14
I have used it quite a bit but not recently, and I always liked the results. Have some frozen in the deep freeze.

interneg
16-Jan-2017, 09:29
It's pretty similar to FP4+ sans red sensitivity in my experience. I've shot a few sheets in camera here and there (mainly use it for masking and other technical purposes) over the last year - more UV, the more ortho the look. It can look surprisingly 'normal' if it's not super sunny. Will try & dig out a few Hasselblad/ Imacon scans I made. Don't use anything less than a deep red (906 from Ilford) safelight - even a 1A might not be enough. I like it a lot, need to shoot more with it & get times & EI's worked out for day-to-day use.

EdWorkman
16-Jan-2017, 09:39
Orthochromatic film is green sensitive [in addition to blue]
Early films, such as used by Sullivan, etc, were color blind, meaning response to blue light [only]
The response of ortho film may be slightly modified by yellow 'ray screens'
[which brings to mind the Martian tales of Edgar Rice Burroughs and the 'eight Barsoomian ray]
Graduated ray screens were used to tame skies to some degree
The 1904 Kodak catalog mentions orthochromatic sensitivity, in blurb for its new NC [non curling] film.
Blue sensitive film continued for use for a decade or two after- it was cheaper, just as plates were cheaper than the easier to use roll films and pack films.

Now then, I wonder if there is an available lith film which is really color blind, so that red subjects are rendered black.
[without a red filter factor of 27 stops]
I'm thinking a Pyro developer could tame the contrast.

Doremus Scudder
16-Jan-2017, 09:40
Check out mid to late 19th century western landscape photos if you want to see how true orthochromatic emulsions render the scenes. I found this for you to check out:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2149899/The-American-West-youve-seen-Amazing-19th-century-pictures-landscape-chartered-time.html

Timothy O'Sullivan's wet plates were blue-sensitive, i.e., monochromatic. Orthochromatic film is sensitive to blue and green and will render green objects (e.g., foliage) a lot lighter than a blue-sensitive emulsion will. Shadows are gratifyingly open; blue skies will be quite light.

Best,

Doremus

John Kasaian
16-Jan-2017, 09:49
That's good to know about greens appearing lighter, as foliage will definitely be in some of the shots. Thanks!

EdWorkman
16-Jan-2017, 10:17
oopps and duuuuuh
a red filter would , besides being useless, not let the blue light pass
And I thought I was doing well

russyoung
29-Jan-2017, 12:54
I shot through a 4x5 box about a decade ago and totally agree with INTERNEG that it seemed like regular film minus red sensitivity. It provided a little better tonal separation in tree leaves but I saw no sign of extraordinary sensitivity to blue or UV. Ilford provides a spectral sensitivity curve in the relevant data sheet: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/webfiles/2011427119221450.pdf

Russ

pepeguitarra
16-Feb-2019, 12:29
Shot with Ilford Ortho Plus

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4821/45709582185_901e5a7490_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/2cDcyhz)Mission San Juan Capistrano Courtyard (https://flic.kr/p/2cDcyhz) by Palenquero Photography (https://www.flickr.com/photos/palenquero/), on Flickr

Jim Noel
16-Feb-2019, 13:35
A very good example of what today's ortho films will do. I use ortho film about 5:1 compared with panchromatic film.

Mark Crabtree
16-Feb-2019, 22:31
A very good example of what today's ortho films will do. I use ortho film about 5:1 compared with panchromatic film.

Is Ortho Plus what you are shooting, or is there something else available in continuous tone today? I've been curious about the Ilford. I've got an old box of Tri-X Ortho that still seem fine. I'm shooting Xray film in 11x14, but I'm not sure how similar that look is.

pepeguitarra
16-Feb-2019, 23:00
I am shooting the Ilford Ortho Plus ISO80. Not sure of the other ortho film from years back, not familiar.


https://static.bhphoto.com/images/images500x500/1534348230000_24605.jpg


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7888/45709579425_c263f8fbf8_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/2cDcxsZ)LosOlivosSJCTrainStation1 (https://flic.kr/p/2cDcxsZ) by Palenquero Photography (https://www.flickr.com/photos/palenquero/), on Flickr

Jim Noel
17-Feb-2019, 07:45
Is Ortho Plus what you are shooting, or is there something else available in continuous tone today? I've been curious about the Ilford. I've got an old box of Tri-X Ortho that still seem fine. I'm shooting Xray film in 11x14, but I'm not sure how similar that look is.

I use both Ortho Plus ans X-ray film. They are very similar.

Pere Casals
17-Feb-2019, 08:11
I'm curious to see how this film will handle Sierra granite.

The most relevant factor is spectral response. An ortho film has the tonality of a regular panchromatic film shot with a deep cyan filter.

With ortho films a yellow filter has the same effect than a green filter, because allowing red to pass (yellow filter) has no effect. So using a Yellow or Green filter with ortho film deilvers same effect than using a green filter with panchro film.

Mark Crabtree
17-Feb-2019, 10:22
I use both Ortho Plus ans X-ray film. They are very similar.

Thanks. That is certainly interesting to hear. The spectral response does look similar in some specs I've seen. I'm still a little surprised sometimes the way some faces look on x-ray film. I tried to get an ortho look for a rephotographic project a number of years ago with filters, but kind of messed it up. I recently got a minus red filter which should be closer. I tried that yesterday for the first time. ortho film such a normal part of photography for so long, but kind of fringe information for a while now.

I have meant to try the Ortho Plus for a long time, but just haven't gotten around to it.

interneg
17-Feb-2019, 10:49
Anyone here shoot with it?
Opinions? Suggestions?

I'm curious to see how this film will handle Sierra granite.

It's a great film for mid-late 20th Century Scottish municipal pebbledash - brings out the contrasts nicely. If your granite is anything like the Aberdeenshire granites, it might do a similar job tonally.

Other aspects of the film worth noting are: 1, it's slightly less hardened than other Ilford films, & is paper interleaved; and 2, the 'ortho'-ish-ness of it depends on how high a CI you take it to - at normal-ish CI's it can look more panchro-esque than you might expect.

mmerig
19-Feb-2019, 23:16
Anyone here shoot with it?
Opinions? Suggestions?

I'm curious to see how this film will handle Sierra granite.

I use Ortho Plus a lot for a project I am doing in NW Wyoming (long-term ecological changes). I use Ortho Plus to sort of match the older emulsions (mostly pre-1920, back to 1872). As others say here say, it is not quite like the blue-sensitive glass plates, and has some green sensitivity (see Ilford's data sheet). For a comparison of a familiar scene using Nathan Lane's glass plate, Ortho Plus, and FP4 Plus, see post #13478 in the landscape forum. Unfortunately, much of the rock is far away and snow-covered, but you may get some idea of the differences.

I have other comparisons with just FP4 Plus and Ortho Plus, some showing rocks up-close. I'll post some if anyone is interested.

https://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?44249-Large-Format-Landscapes/page1348

Jim Noel
20-Feb-2019, 15:13
Orthochromatic film is green sensitive [in addition to blue]
Early films, such as used by Sullivan, etc, were color blind, meaning response to blue light [only]
The response of ortho film may be slightly modified by yellow 'ray screens'
[which brings to mind the Martian tales of Edgar Rice Burroughs and the 'eight Barsoomian ray]
Graduated ray screens were used to tame skies to some degree
The 1904 Kodak catalog mentions orthochromatic sensitivity, in blurb for its new NC [non curling] film.
Blue sensitive film continued for use for a decade or two after- it was cheaper, just as plates were cheaper than the easier to use roll films and pack films.

Now then, I wonder if there is an available lith film which is really color blind, so that red subjects are rendered black.
[without a red filter factor of 27 stops]
I'm thinking a Pyro developer could tame the contrast.

I use lith film from Freestyle, their best one, and get a nice scale from it. The biggest problem with 8x10 is the film is so thin it bows if the camera is tilted down.

Jim Noel
20-Feb-2019, 15:16
Is Ortho Plus what you are shooting, or is there something else available in continuous tone today? I've been curious about the Ilford. I've got an old box of Tri-X Ortho that still seem fine. I'm shooting Xray film in 11x14, but I'm not sure how similar that look is.

Iuse Tri=X Ortho as well as Ilford Ortho and large quantities of single sided x-ray film.

Mark Sampson
20-Feb-2019, 19:43
Tri-X Ortho 4163 has been discontinued since about 1992 so finding any may be difficult. Wish I'd bought some before it was gone- like several other EK films that I never got around to using properly... Commercial 4127, Ektapan 4162, Super-XX... the list goes on.