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AndyL
9-May-2016, 20:40
My wife gave me a ROC Carlton Camera with stand case, shutter lens, and 5 Plates. She found it in an estate sale. The lens is a Volute Bausch and Lomb version 1 looks to have a shutter, and it also has a Zeiss Anastigmat Series V 1891, this lens and board don't have any obvious shutter, just an aperture control lever .Camera is beautiful!! Any information would be great!! Is it still possible to use this camera?, Is there any preloaded boards to be had? Who develops anymore? Thanks
Andy
email info would be greatly appreciated.
andyl3@me.com

goamules
10-May-2016, 05:39
Hi, this was the top of the line Rochester camera, and you'll notice the beautiful mahogany and brass. It also was in the British style, with more movements and requiring a special tripod (hard to find) that fits on that brass bracket on the bottom.

This is a good site to explore: http://piercevaubel.com/cam/roc.htm It has catalogs http://piercevaubel.com/cam/roc/carlton.htm that show you the Carlton.

Yes, you can use these cameras, if you have the right plate holder, and the metal film inserts to adapt the plate holder for film. The Rochesters of this era sometimes need a special holder without the catch groove, so using a more modern alternate holder sometimes won't work. I have a similar Rochester Universal that I shoot, using the proper old holders. They are beautiful, light, and fun to use. If yours is like most, it's a wholeplate size with a 6 1/2 X 8 1/2 ground glass. That is the most difficult size to find film and holders. Larger or smaller is better.

Tracy Storer
10-May-2016, 08:58
They made the Carlton in many different sizes, most (if not all) I have seen do not adhere to modern film holder sizes, but it sounds like you have some film / plate holders?
"Volute" was a B&L shutter which had one set of blades which served as both shutter and aperture blades. The lens nomenclature may be on the edge of the front lens cell mount. What size is your camera, and what focal length is your Zeiss Series V?

goamules
10-May-2016, 11:11
The Calton was made in 4x5; 4x6; 5x7; 5x8; 6x8; 8x10; 10x12; 11x14. For some reason, all I ever see are wholeplate, and the occasional 8x10.

Two23
10-May-2016, 15:59
The Volute shutter dates to around 1908--1915. I have one on my Century Camera No.46 (folding 4x5.) I think they're the prettiest shutter ever made. They were an advancement over the older B&L "double pumpers" of the time.


Kent in SD

AndyL
10-May-2016, 17:32
150743 here she is, thanks so much for the help, the size looks to be 61/ by 8 1/2. I have 5 of these cassettes.

AndyL
10-May-2016, 17:43
150744150745150746

AndyL
10-May-2016, 17:47
Where would I start to get sheet film for this? Is there a manual? Is there casuists that are preloaded that I can send out for printing? really appreciate the help.

goamules
10-May-2016, 18:14
Ah ha! I had a hunch it would be wholeplate! It's a good size, but finding film is sometimes hard. Once a year you can buy Ilford in a special run. The film shops like Freestyle may have some now.

You will have to learn to load film sheets into the holders, you'll never find a a film pack for this format, if they ever made one. You can develop yourself pretty easily. Just read this forum. If Rochester made a manual in 1890, it would be full of colorful period language and chemistry no longer available.

goamules
10-May-2016, 18:20
Here is mine, a Universal, and a wholeplate photo I took. I used a Cooke Anastigmat lens in Volute shutter, not the Cooke Rapid View Portrait (RVP) soft focus lens shown.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8022/7615612952_af26e38226_b.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/540/18418511924_10eb41e635_b.jpg

Oren Grad
10-May-2016, 18:25
Once a year you can buy Ilford in a special run.

The annual small-quantity special order period is currently open, until May 27. Full details of available films and participating dealers available on the Ilford website here (http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/20163291435591962.pdf). Pricing is set by each dealer.

Tracy Storer
10-May-2016, 20:09
Don't forget 14"x17"......I have a beautiful one, lovingly refinished by my dear friend Patrick Alt for his own use which he later gifted me.


The Calton was made in 4x5; 4x6; 5x7; 5x8; 6x8; 8x10; 10x12; 11x14. For some reason, all I ever see are wholeplate, and the occasional 8x10.

Tracy Storer
10-May-2016, 20:27
I also have an 8x10, for which I built a new back to fit modern holders.......a refurb never finished...... The cameras are lightweight and usable, but a little fussy and less friendly to big heavy lenses. (the lensboards are small, and front standards lack diagonal bracing)

Jim Andrada
10-May-2016, 21:27
I think the Ilford special order window is still open for this year's production and if you'd like a few sheets of FP4+ to get started with while waiting for it I'd be happy to just send them to you if you're in the US. It's a wonderful size to work with and I've made a lot of exhibition prints in this size even if they were shot on MF or 4 x 5. They're big enough to look good on the wall.

Nodda Duma
10-May-2016, 21:33
You can also coat plates yourself using your own emulsion or something like Liquid Light, then develop the negatives.

Armin Seeholzer
12-May-2016, 13:16
My wife gave me a ROC Carlton Camera with stand case, shutter lens, and 5 Plates. She found it in an estate sale.

You have the best wife, mine always say's you have to many cameras and she never gave me one you are a lucky man!!!

Cheers Armin

AndyL
18-May-2016, 04:44
Thank you for your responses. It would seem that I should understand Large Format Photography a bit more before trying to mess with the Carlton. It sits in my office, open and on the tripod, they really are beautiful. I have received multiple suggestions to purchase an Easier to use 8x10 camera and learn more first. So the search is on for a Kodak Master View in 8x10. Really appreciate the help.
amlsml@verizon.net

Steven Tribe
19-May-2016, 06:01
My wife gave me a ROC Carlton Camera with stand case, shutter lens, and 5 Plates. She found it in an estate sale......................
andyl3@me.com

I think she will soon realise that she has made a big mistake. There is something about brass and mahogany that brings even sensible people into a state of acquirement frenzy

John Kasaian
19-May-2016, 07:35
Thank you for your responses. It would seem that I should understand Large Format Photography a bit more before trying to mess with the Carlton. It sits in my office, open and on the tripod, they really are beautiful. I have received multiple suggestions to purchase an Easier to use 8x10 camera and learn more first. So the search is on for a Kodak Master View in 8x10. Really appreciate the help.
amlsml@verizon.net
Aside from loading sheet film into plate holders and the unusual format---whole plate---there shouldn't be any difference in technique between your Carlton and a more modern 8x10. KMVs are fine cameras, but a stamped lens board that will fit your lens will likely be difficult to find. You might consider something like Kodak 2-D or Ansco Universal as well.

goamules
19-May-2016, 09:01
There was a KMV being sold on this forum the other day. But using either camera is exactly the same.

AndyL
23-May-2016, 04:52
Do you know if there is a way to adapt my Whole plate to film? Are there inserts? I showed the film holder to a fellow this weekend who confirmed it was designed for glass plate. He referenced holders, but couldn't remember what I would need. Thanks

Steven Tribe
23-May-2016, 11:26
There are a series of thin metal sheaths which were made for plate holders which allow the use of sheet film. Kodak made these and they are fortunately labelled quite well on the back. These are still available(used!). You will need the full plate size OR a smaller size like 5x7". In the later case, you will need a thin plywood insert with a hole cut out measuring 5x7".

goamules
23-May-2016, 13:11
Do you know if there is a way to adapt my Whole plate to film? Are there inserts? I showed the film holder to a fellow this weekend who confirmed it was designed for glass plate. He referenced holders, but couldn't remember what I would need. Thanks


Reply #2...

Yes, you can use these cameras, if you have the right plate holder, and the metal film inserts to adapt the plate holder for film....

Ummm....to quote myself above, Yes. You're not reading closely, are you?

Jim Andrada
23-May-2016, 18:10
Hi Andy

Take a look at this link http://www.ilfordphoto.com/photocommunity/forums/theforum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7770

There are people who make regular film holders in full plate size . But the most common way is to use a thin metal sheath that accepts whole plate film and which fit into the plate holders. I haven't seen any for sale lately but they do show up from time to time in the usual places (here, the auction site, other forums, etc) It's a great size. More compact than 8 x 10 but a lot larger than 5 x 7.

I don't believe that the film holder sizes were quite standardized yet and different camera makers made different sized holders even though the film/plates themselves were "pretty" standardized.

This is sort of what they look like, although these are actually for use in a graflex holder and aren't exactly what you're looking for. But it should give you the general idea of what we're talking about.

151157

151158

AndyL
24-May-2016, 19:28
Jim, Thanks that is exactly what I was looking for. Now the trick is to find them. I have been googling film holders with no luck in the full plate that I have. I will keep searching, thanks andy

Peter Gomena
24-May-2016, 19:46
I see whole plate film sheaths from time-to-time on the Pacific Rim Camera site. You have to hunt around in their large format odd-size film holder section. Film is available. I own a ROC Standard in whole plate size. Fun camera to use.

barnacle
25-May-2016, 11:22
Just gloating a little here :) - I have some OEM film inserts still in the wrapping paper for my quarter plate Sanderson, which has wooden carriers for glass plates.

But I shan't mention it, since it's a tad small to be large format!

Neil

goamules
25-May-2016, 16:44
The Wholeplate sized inserts are hard to find. The 5x7s common, but you need the adapters....rare. I've got a half dozen of both.

Fr. Mark
16-Sep-2016, 17:54
I just bought one an 8x10 one of these cameras minus bellows and disassembled. I will be making a few simpler brass pieces from hardware store stock and between those and a few dozen brass screws I'm into the deal $35 so far. It came with 3 holders for film one has been adapted for 5x7 by gluing guide rails in it. One of the holders is printed on the inside which Kodak cameras it is compatible with. I also have 5 old plate/film sheath holders in 8x10. I will eventually measure and see where the focal plane is in each.

Also, I have a Thornton Pickard Ruby half plate camera with holders for glass plates. Someone used sheet metal to make adapters for 4x5 films that fit the 1/2 plate holders.

I was thinking to build an 8x10 but this will be a much easier path forward even if I have to make the bellows.

premortho
13-Jan-2017, 12:17
On the film aquisition problem, maybe I can help you. I buy Kodak Carestream film in 8X10, which I cut down to 5X7, usually. I also use it in 8X10, occasionally. It is an ortho chromatic film, which you can cut and load, and develop under red safe light. I prefer ortho film for developing as I like to develop by inspection. In trays. There is no real reason to get another camera. They all work the same. It is no harder to learn with the camera your wife (What a wife!) got you than any other. For example, I bought an Ansco 5X7 Commercial view in the late fifties, and never felt the need to get a better one, even if there was such a thing. Learn the camera that you have. You will use it for the rest of your life. AND, when your wife sees you using that magnificent camera for years and years, think how she will feel, knowing she bought it for you! You can mount a Packard Shutter on the back of the lens standard for lenses without shutters. My Ansco came with a Packard, and I've used it for more than fifty years.

AndyL
16-Jan-2017, 08:37
Thanks for the reply!! My biggest hurdle will be learning to slow down. I am accustomed to wide open apertures, digital files, photomechanic and frames per second. Re teaching my brain has been the challenge. Have not exposed 1 frame yet!!

barnacle
16-Jan-2017, 12:16
I may have a record there: between buying my first large format camera and actually making an image with it was about two years... and I inherited a quarter-plate camera thirty years ago which is in excellent condition but on which I have never made a photo!

Neil

Patrick13
16-Jan-2017, 15:47
By coincidence I got a full plate version of this recently, too. This is inspiring me to get down to work on it sooner than in two years :)
A little bellows patching and a lot of shutter un-gunking and it'll be ready to go. I have exactly one full plate sized holder which, oddly, has an inset sheet of wood to hold a 4x5 glass plate centered.

You'll enjoy the new pace of working large, it's very relaxing. Enjoy!

159880