PDA

View Full Version : Print washer



Ricardo Maydana
17-Oct-2015, 16:06
hi anyone can help, I need plan for print washer 20x24. Tkh

Daniel Stone
17-Oct-2015, 18:43
Hi Ricardo,

While I don't have any plans for a traditional vertical print washer, I have some ideas for alternatives, if you might be open to such?

1. Do you have anything against washing in trays? Larger trays can be sourced relatively inexpensively from home/hardware stores, look for "washing machine drip pan" when searching for it. They're much cheaper than traditional photo chemistry trays, but serve pretty much the same purpose.

2. If you haven't heard about the "Ilford method" to washing prints, it's good reading, and can help save a large amount of water in the long run. Google can provide you with such info in multiple locations, if someone here doesn't chime in first.
Hypo clear can also aid in shortening wash times(especially for fiber papers) by a HUGE margin.

-Dan

Liquid Artist
17-Oct-2015, 21:03
I've done the print tray and it does work, even a clean bathtub works. However a real print washer seems to do the best job.

My only true print washer at this time is a An old Paterson.
It is basically a plastic box with 12 spacers or so. Plus 2 hoses going to the top both on the same end. One for the tap and one for the drain.
I thought that the fresh water may just flow from one hose right down the other, so I re-routed the input to the bottom of the opposite side, hoping that it would help the chemistry rise to the top and flow out.

I can't see why you can't just use a large rubbermaid box with spacers and a hose directing the fresh water to where you want it. If it's in a sink or tub you can just let the waste water flow over the top, if you want it going down a drain you will probably want a hole drilled near the top with a hose going to it.

Ian Gordon Bilson
17-Oct-2015, 21:19
hi anyone can help, I need plan for print washer 20x24. Tkh

Ricardo, two things. Your concern is washing,but the real concern is damage or stress to the print itself. This requires that the print is not stressed in any way , or lifted,dropped,folded or creased.
Now,imagine the physics of suspending a 20x24 in a water column,which is your vertical washer,whatever design.
The print should be flat,in a tray, and sequential changes of water used (a.k.a the "Ilford method",which was designed for film washing,but the basic principle applies).
Hold the print gently while pouring off the wash changes.
Not web theory,but practical experience.

Daniel Stone
18-Oct-2015, 00:17
Not to sound like I'm full of hot air ;), but I just remembered a tip told to me by an "old timer" I met while printing some years ago at a local community darkroom:


Wash your prints in slightly warmer water. NOT hot, more around 80F or so. The theory of using warmer water to wash is based on the easier dilution of residual fixer/hypo in warm water versus cool/cold tap water at 68F(20C). While older papers had a greater chance of emulsion frilling and/or lifting away from the base, more modern papers are a good deal more robust in terms of being handled without the greatest degree of care :).

I have personally followed the Ilford method for washing both film and prints the last few years, and based on the scientific data, I think it's a safe bet that it's worth trying at least.

Ricardo Maydana
19-Oct-2015, 18:48
From already thank you very much for your comments, my answers;

1 - I have nothing against using trays, I would like to know the model you use.

2 - The method Ilford, I do not know, I'll see internte searching. not bad some reading.

Here in Paraguay analog materials for photographing, they are scarce.
from now my greetings

Ricardo Maydana
19-Oct-2015, 18:54
I've done the print tray and it does work, even a clean bathtub works. However a real print washer seems to do the best job.

My only true print washer at this time is a An old Paterson.
It is basically a plastic box with 12 spacers or so. Plus 2 hoses going to the top both on the same end. One for the tap and one for the drain.
I thought that the fresh water may just flow from one hose right down the other, so I re-routed the input to the bottom of the opposite side, hoping that it would help the chemistry rise to the top and flow out.

I can't see why you can't just use a large rubbermaid box with spacers and a hose directing the fresh water to where you want it. If it's in a sink or tub you can just let the waste water flow over the top, if you want it going down a drain you will probably want a hole drilled near the top with a hose going to it.

His examples and experiences, is not a bad idea a tray, in fact it is easier.
The box with dividers, is something I have to send to build in acrylic.
So ask if anyone had gone through this experience.

This is just the beginning, I have not yet decided what will be the size of prints I'll be copying frequently.

Regards.

Ricardo Maydana
19-Oct-2015, 18:58
Ricardo, two things. Your concern is washing,but the real concern is damage or stress to the print itself. This requires that the print is not stressed in any way , or lifted,dropped,folded or creased.
Now,imagine the physics of suspending a 20x24 in a water column,which is your vertical washer,whatever design.
The print should be flat,in a tray, and sequential changes of water used (a.k.a the "Ilford method",which was designed for film washing,but the basic principle applies).
Hold the print gently while pouring off the wash changes.
Not web theory,but practical experience.

Very true,

Not web theory, but practical experience.

Ricardo Maydana
21-Oct-2015, 08:41
Hello, very grateful for your comments, interesting comments. They can upload photos of print washer

Kevin Crisp
21-Oct-2015, 10:31
Tray washing works fine if you wash a small number of prints at a time, and shuffle them from time to time. Unfortunately the shuffling part can lead to a crease if you are not careful.

If you load a tray up with 10 or 15 prints at a time and leave them alone, the centers of the prints will remain quite contaminated.