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View Full Version : Tired of rickety museum pieces... what modern 8x10 or 11x14 to buy?



Jac@stafford.net
26-May-2015, 14:44
I'm tired of rickety, worn out museum pieces.

That made me smile. Been there.

So it seems that the strength of the front standard is the critical part. Correct? How does the V8 Deardorff fair in that regard?

Ari
27-May-2015, 06:26
If you can handle the extra 3-5 pounds of weight, the most solid 8x10 field camera I have ever used is the Toyo 810M or 810MII.

Bruce Schultz
27-May-2015, 06:38
I've had a dorff. Too floppy

Bruce Schultz
27-May-2015, 06:40
What did you end up getting Jac?

neil poulsen
27-May-2015, 07:06
Another nice thing about Toyo, is that it accepts a decent lens hood that can handle large lenses.

William Whitaker
27-May-2015, 07:22
I'm tired of rickety, worn out museum pieces. I use large, heavy brass lenses in the field and need something that is easy to set up/tear down, and doesn't need duct tape.

Just curious... What movements are important to you? (I mean, outside of your suggestion of a Chamonix..)

Louis Pacilla
27-May-2015, 07:31
Please don't turn this into a multi- page discussion on modern 8x10 cameras. Do that in Cameras & Accessories Then after you narrow down put a WTB for that camera.

Oren Grad
27-May-2015, 07:45
Moved.

Jac@stafford.net
27-May-2015, 09:26
What did you end up getting Jac?

Calumet Black Beast. It is a b*tch to carry, but remains the most sturdy and accurate 8x10 I have ever used. My others are a Deardorff V8 (too damned heavy), and a pristine Century 1 (too light!) - oh, and a Century studio camera but while that doesn't count, it handles any big brass lens.

Louis Pacilla
27-May-2015, 10:26
Moved.

Thanks Oren.


Calumet Black Beast. It is a b*tch to carry, but remains the most sturdy and accurate 8x10 I have ever used. My others are a Deardorff V8 (too damned heavy), and a pristine Century 1 (too light!) - oh, and a Century studio camera but while that doesn't count, it handles any big brass lens.

That C1 may be the best choice for a "sturdy" 8x10 w/ front movements if your using the camera with heavy barrel lenses. My modern light weight 8x10 camera is the worst choice when I use my heavy barrel. That's why I have several 8x10s for different uses.

Drew Wiley
27-May-2015, 10:41
Don't confuse weight with rigidity. There are 8x10's as heavy as a tank yet floppy as a dashboard hula doll, and lightweight ones very well designed.

Randy Moe
27-May-2015, 11:20
Calumet C1 in original magnesium. Tailboard design, studio camera that folds up and can carry any lens that will fit a 6" metal lens board. 33" extension.

They still sell for the same price as when new in 1977.

Now tell me it's too heavy, at 20 lbs, with captive extension, sliding block, dark cloth, dark cloth support wire and OE aluminum carry case. Actual weight 1 minute ago.

:)

Luis-F-S
27-May-2015, 11:47
I've got 4 Dorff's, no issues with the 24 Artar/Copal 3 on the V8, or the 19 Artar/Copal 3; 14" Dagor/Compur 3 on the V5's. L

Drew Wiley
27-May-2015, 13:27
I use equivalent lenses on my Phillips, which weighs half as much as a Dorff and is probably way more stable.

goamules
27-May-2015, 17:36
It seems to me any design that has a metal brace in front, with the sliding locknut, would be stable. It's a three point connection. As opposed to a 2D or similar field cameras with no movements, which just have a front standard with no brace.

Kirk Gittings
27-May-2015, 18:05
I use equivalent lenses on my Phillips, which weighs half as much as a Dorff and is probably way more stable.

yep

AuditorOne
27-May-2015, 19:17
This seems a bit like peeing in the wind to me.

Personally I don't run around looking for the biggest lens to park on the front of my camera. My little Fuji handles the needed movements satisfactorily and my Dorff seems to hold up just fine.

Of course I don't have anywhere near the experience that some of you have. :)

But I certainly do hate packing that thing around so I would happily take that Phillips off your hands if your tired of it. :D

tgtaylor
27-May-2015, 21:16
Well the 8x10 Toyo (field and studio) easily handles a 14" f6 Veritar - a front mount lens - on the front standard with zero migration once the standard is locked down. Locking down on one side of the standard is sufficient and that's how I usually do it since the other hand is lifting the lens from the bottom for the correct rise/fall but once that is achieved I lock down the 2d side as well. As long as it will fit on a Toyo board, the camera will easily handle any lens you put on it with zero migration once locked.

Thomas

docw
28-May-2015, 10:09
My camera is probably a museum piece but is sure isn't rickety. I use a Kodak Master 8x10 with both a 14 inch Commercial Ektar and a 24 inch LD Artar (barrel lens). The camera is aluminum and magnesium and weighs about 12 lbs. They are getting more expensive, it seems, but I have seen them recently still selling for under 2K.

Check it out here (http://www.largeformatphotography.info/kodak/masterview.html).

William Whitaker
28-May-2015, 10:29
My camera is probably a museum piece but is sure isn't rickety. I use a Kodak Master 8x10 with both a 14 inch Commercial Ektar and a 24 inch LD Artar (barrel lens). The camera is aluminum and magnesium and weighs about 12 lbs. They are getting more expensive, it seems, but I have seen them recently still selling for under 2K.

Check it out here (http://www.largeformatphotography.info/kodak/masterview.html).

+1. I've had two Masters and agree that they are very rigid and robust cameras. I would also agree that the prices tend to be creeping upward, slowly, but still, on the rise.

mstrickland
29-May-2015, 16:02
I just picked up a new Arca Swiss F-Line 8x10. Definitely more sturdy than any other 8x10 field camera I've used.

ImSoNegative
1-Jun-2015, 07:19
I have had a few 8x10s and my favorite was my c1 without a doubt.