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rado
5-Jan-2015, 12:12
Hi everyone, this is my first post here, so if my question has been discussed before I apologise, but I could not find anything useful with the search bar. I am about to get my first large format camera and I am slightly confused with the specs. I found this near by and it's in mint condition:
Linhof 4x5 Super Technika V. Serial # 2161781, but on the large back / it comes with 2 backs/ , it states 9/12 cm, slightly different then the 4/5 inch. My question is: It will be close to impossible to find 9/12 cm film arround, so will I be able to use this back with the standard 4/5 inch sheet films, by simply buying new film holders, or there will be issues with compatibility and framing? To my eyes, the 9/12 looks identical on the outside, it's probably different inside where the film guides are?

Please, help me to clear this confusion. I just want to make pictures, not fiddling with incompatible media :) The Polaroid back is also 9/12 cm, but I guess that's the normal standard size for it?

Thanks in advance,
Rado

Liquid Artist
5-Jan-2015, 12:35
This link should help you out (http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?74928-Is-9x12-4x5).
This board doesn't have the best search feature, so you may need Google at times.

karl french
5-Jan-2015, 12:37
Modern 4x5 inch and 9x12cm film holders are the same external dimensions. Internally they are different. The 9x12 film will fall out of the 4x5 holders and the 4x5 film won't fit into the 9x12cm holders. You can use them interchangeably. The Linhof back says both "4x5" and "9x12cm"

You should be able to get most of the modern films in 9x12cm via Europe as it's the standard there. There was a time when I preferred the slightly more elongated proportions of 9x12cm so I picked up a bunch of Fidelity 9x12cm holders. I've used them in all my 4x5 cameras as well.

rado
5-Jan-2015, 12:46
thank you so much, that means if I buy 4/5 holders I will not have issues with using it on this specific camera/back combo? If so, that's a relief, cause I really like this camera :)

Sevo
5-Jan-2015, 12:51
The outer dimensions of "international" holders are the same, so you can simply get yourself some 4x5 holders. 9x12cm film can still be had in Germany, but it might be more difficult to find in the US, hardly worth while if you only own two holders. Polaroid did never exist in 9x12, it only ever was made in quarter plate (approx. 8x10cm) and 4x5 - with Polaroid gone and Fuji currently only selling quarter plate film, you'd actually be lucky if it were a QP/8x10cm holder.

karl french
5-Jan-2015, 12:52
Since the Linhof was designed around 9x12cm film you will notice a slight about of mechanical vignetting when you shoot 4x5 film. Depending on the focal length of the lens you will notice more or less rounding of the corners on your negatives.

rado
5-Jan-2015, 12:57
ouch

rado
5-Jan-2015, 12:58
I was about to shoot with 75mm that probably means pretty heavy vignetting, right?

Sevo
5-Jan-2015, 13:35
The Super Technika V is the second Linhof generation built for international backs - absolutely no vignetting there. Of course, the Technikas allow for more movements than most lenses you'll use on them, and you obviously have more room for movements with a smaller format, but that is not a 4x5 specific issue.

Lachlan 717
5-Jan-2015, 13:55
You'll need to check that the ground glass is marked for 4x5 and not just 9x12. This won't stop you using the former; but you'll need to get your head around compemsating for the difference in aspect.

rado
5-Jan-2015, 14:07
Thank you so much for the guiding. Still thinking, but I think I will go with it.

karl french
5-Jan-2015, 17:40
The Technika V is a great camera. Better than a Master if ask me. And yes, you will see some vignetting with a Tech V and 4x5 film. It's more pronounced with long lenses than wide angles. Either way, it's not a big deal.

Liquid Artist
5-Jan-2015, 19:56
Freestyle does handle 9x12 film, although you are presently limited.
http://www.freestylephoto.biz/category/1-Film?attr[]=1-49
However I imagine you can special order some Ilford. They do special cuts once a year or so.

towolf
6-Jan-2015, 07:31
Karl, there is no vignetting.

But the problem with 75mm is that it is very tricky to make the lid not appear in the frame, especially in vertical orientation. You need to flip down the lid, but then the 75mm is inside the housing and rack focussing doesnít work. You can kind of use the extensible back with the rods to focus. But that is kind of clumsy and achieving parallelism is not so easy. In addition, on my Tech V iíts kinda tough to pop the back off by pressing those latches on the side.

The newer Technikas have a second wide-angle rack focus inside the housing to make that easier.

rado
6-Jan-2015, 08:23
Will I have the same issue with 90 or 110 mm lens? Sorry for the dumb question, but I have 0 experience with operating a 4/5 :)


Karl, there is no vignetting.

But the problem with 75mm is that it is very tricky to make the lid not appear in the frame, especially in vertical orientation. You need to flip down the lid, but then the 75mm is inside the housing and rack focussing doesn’t work. You can kind of use the extensible back with the rods to focus. But that is kind of clumsy and achieving parallelism is not so easy. In addition, on my Tech V i’ts kinda tough to pop the back off by pressing those latches on the side.

The newer Technikas have a second wide-angle rack focus inside the housing to make that easier.

karl french
6-Jan-2015, 09:39
It's something you need to keep in mind when using wide angle lenses on a Technika. I did use both a 90 and 110 frequently. (Occasionally a 75mm Super Angulon as well.) You need to remember to slide focusing track back, drop the bed and then use front rise to get the lens back up toward the center of the frame. Then compose. This is detailed in the Technika user manual as the "wide angle procedure." It helps with avoiding getting the bed of the camera in you shots when using wide angles.

The minor to moderate mechanical vignetting issue really only becomes noticeable with lenses of 210mm or longer. You won't see it with wide angles like the 75/90/110.

rado
6-Jan-2015, 09:59
thank you

rado
6-Jan-2015, 10:03
I will probably figure it out, I need to find an english language manual first, as the camera comes with German only :)


It's something you need to keep in mind when using wide angle lenses on a Technika. I did use both a 90 and 110 frequently. (Occasionally a 75mm Super Angulon as well.) You need to remember to slide focusing track back, drop the bed and then use front rise to get the lens back up toward the center of the frame. Then compose. This is detailed in the Technika user manual as the "wide angle procedure." It helps with avoiding getting the bed of the camera in you shots when using wide angles.

The minor to moderate mechanical vignetting issue really only becomes noticeable with lenses of 210mm or longer. You won't see it with wide angles like the 75/90/110.

karl french
6-Jan-2015, 10:11
The Master Technika Classic user's manual from the Linhof webpage is a good place to start. The operation procedure is pretty much the same between the Master and the V. Keeping in mind that you don't have the top flap with the V.

rado
6-Jan-2015, 10:25
thanks

danno@cnwl.igs
6-Jan-2015, 13:16
Rado, the Technica V is a superb machine, and you will be proud to own it and use it. One area of care, though, similar to buying a classic Rolls Royce, check the leather bellows, and keep the leather healthy.

Jac@stafford.net
6-Jan-2015, 13:20
Rado, the Technica V is a superb machine, and you will be proud to own it and use it. One area of care, though, similar to buying a classic Rolls Royce, check the leather bellows, and keep the leather healthy.

One other tip, if I may: Be sure to unlock the front rise lever before pushing it. Very many break when forced, and it doesn't take an iron man to do it.
.

rado
6-Jan-2015, 13:59
thank you guys, any advice is really appreciated!