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View Full Version : What are those bolts called for tripods etc that have threads on end, then no threads



Jon Shiu
13-Dec-2014, 16:39
Trying to search for the technical name for those bolts/knobs with the threads on end, then a thinner shaft section with no threads. Like the kind on tripods. Would anything like that be available in a hardware store. (I think there is a guy on here who is a hardware store clerk who knows a lot?)

It looks like this, only I would like a longer bolt with about 1.5" of extension.126522

Jon

Jonathan Barlow
13-Dec-2014, 17:09
Captive?

Jim C.
13-Dec-2014, 17:10
Just about to say what Jonathan did.

http://www.mcmaster.com/#thumb-screws/=7sdi7rexwki3nnn1ng

Alan Gales
13-Dec-2014, 17:10
Are you talking about carriage bolts? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carriage_bolt

I don't think they make them that short though.

Jon Shiu
13-Dec-2014, 17:35
Thanks, I'll search for captive bolt or knob. I need them for a bi-post studio stand to fasten the camera to the platform.

Jon

Bill Burk
13-Dec-2014, 19:16
You can find a full threaded bolt that fits your need, chuck into a drill, and file the shaft to meet your needs. I've done that a few times.

Tracy Storer
13-Dec-2014, 19:55
I don't think I've ever encountered them ready-made other than as replacement parts from tripod companies. Your friendly neighborhood machine shop should be able to turn the threads off a screw to a shoulder just under the root diameter for clearance for not too much money.

Randy Moe
13-Dec-2014, 20:02
This is from my Deardorff BiPost. I don't have any spares.

126525

djdister
13-Dec-2014, 21:20
It may not be quite as good as the original equipment, but I bought a couple of these from Amazon because they were so cheap - a 3/8" x 16 threaded stud with handle - $3.84 each! Just needed to add a thick washer and I was back in business. http://amzn.com/B00A9N567U

126529

WayneStevenson
13-Dec-2014, 21:55
Captive bolt with retainer?
Retainer could be a circlip.

The "thumb-screw" type cross-hatch texture is called "knurled". It's a machining / lathe technique.

If you're looking for the type that screw in, and then the other nut adds force to take up the slack you're looking for a lock nut. Or knurled lock nut.

Nodda Duma
14-Dec-2014, 02:56
Captive thumb screw

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=900982&gclid=CLqV1fOixcICFewF7AodNjEALA&Q=&is=REG&A=details