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syclone
18-Nov-2014, 12:39
Hello all:

I have a camera that I can't identify. It's a 5X7 with a Wollensak Elostigmat lens. Any identification plates are gone. I've attached a couple of photos. I had a suspicion that it's a Deardorff, but the hardware isn't quite right. Any help would be appreciated. I accidentally post this query to the Image forum and apparently ruffled some feathers. Sorry, it was a beginner error. Here are a couple of shots of the camera in question.


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Randy Moe
18-Nov-2014, 12:42
Nice camera. Sorry for my rude welcome.

I really don't know, but I see that bottom tripod plate on British Empire cameras, especially ones made in India.

Somebody will know.

Good luck and thanks for your patience with me.

djdister
18-Nov-2014, 13:50
Nice camera. Sorry for my rude welcome.

I really don't know, but I see that bottom tripod plate on British Empire cameras, especially ones made in India.

Somebody will know.

Good luck and thanks for your patience with me.

That bottom tripod plate is rather distinctive, and should help nail down the maker as Randy said.

Randy Moe
18-Nov-2014, 13:55
look here.
http://www.antiquecameras.net/

IanG
18-Nov-2014, 14:08
It'll most likely be Indian or Japanese, it's a British style field camera.

Ian

Steven Tribe
18-Nov-2014, 14:59
Agree with Ian. It would nice to see the back as the 4 GG brass holding corners can be quite revealing!

syclone
18-Nov-2014, 20:33
Thanks, all for the help and support. Here is a photo of the back of the camera.

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Jody_S
19-Nov-2014, 00:44
Indian? I would expect finer craftsmanship on a Japanese camera.

IanG
19-Nov-2014, 01:38
I'd be more inclined to say Indian, the Japanese copied the Indian cameras though so they look almost the same.

Houghtons had a subsidiary & factory in India, one of their major shareholders was Viscount later Lord Astor (and his family) who had been Aide De Camp to the Viceroy of India before WWI. So most Indian cameras were based on their designs.

Ian

IanG
19-Nov-2014, 02:11
http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?117963-Help-with-camera-identification

It's not a 7x5 / 5x7 camera it's half plate and would have taken book form plate/film holders.

Ian

Steven Tribe
19-Nov-2014, 02:58
The "Neptune's Trident" corner GG fitments are trademark Indian, I seem to recall (see previous threads) !

The removal of the name plate may be a pro-active attempt to conceal the camera's birthplace! But these cameras do have their own quality.

Have a good look at the wood, which is often more exotic and ethnic than mahogany or teak.

But removal of Japanese characters on a camera could have been done in the period following Pearl Harbor (historical, not political).

IanG
19-Nov-2014, 06:53
Asunama used those Neptune tridents and the fittings on the back are their style as well, it was a period of copying. There's something that struck me about the front standard and the way it folds, it's unlike most Indian cameras I've seen but but very similar to post WWII Japanese filed cameras. There were a few camera workshops in Osaka and Charten were exporting field and tailboard cameras from Japan prior to WWII.

The back is fitted upside down in the OP's photo, it should open and fold over the top of the camera to insert the boookform holders.

I have Charten & Asunama advert from the 30's and if I get a chance will see if there's a possible match.

Ian

syclone
20-Nov-2014, 08:05
Thanks,everybody for your efforts to identify this camera. I've looked at the possible candidates from various suggestions, but no luck, so far. I've attached a couple of additional photos which might help. The first one is the camera at full extension. It measures 21.5 inches. The second one are the detail of the front lens mount brackets. I've yet to see any camera that has this double bracket configuration. I hope this information aids in getting a positive identification for this camera. By the way, I flipped the rear frame. It mounts equally well both ways. I guess it a personal preference as to whether the photographer wanted the film carrier flipped over the top or laying down on a flat surface. Also, both the film carrier and the inside of the body have the number 34 stamped into the wood.

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r_a_feldman
20-Nov-2014, 12:00
Asunama used those Neptune tridents and the fittings on the back are their style as well, it was a period of copying. <snip> Ian

My Okuhara (Osaka, Japan) half plate folder also uses the same shape GG holders, so they definitely are not restricted to Indian cameras. In previous posts, I have suggested (with no real evidence) that the various Asian camera makers could have purchased metal fittings from a common source and then done their own woodworking and assembly.

Bob

Henrim
20-Nov-2014, 12:07
Oriental (http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Oriental) cameras have a lot in common with your camera.

For example this one: http://kanscamera.sakura.ne.jp/hp7/html/p108.html

syclone
20-Nov-2014, 14:32
Oriental (http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Oriental) cameras have a lot in common with your camera.

For example this one: http://kanscamera.sakura.ne.jp/hp7/html/p108.html

The plate holder hardware pictured in your reference is virtually identical with my camera. However, the front mounting brackets a totally different. We're getting warm. Thanks for your help.