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View Full Version : 8x10 used cameras are mainly from the US



MilamBardo
13-Nov-2014, 05:50
Hi,

I was wondering whether the majority of 8x10 used cameras come the the US market? I'm based in the UK, and don't have a very large budget (max 500), and I'm wondering whether I'm going to need to bite the bullet and pay postage + import (plus run the risk of cross border importing).

There are a lot of used fullplate cameras on the market over here, but I really want to go up to 8x10 (I am interest in shooting plates & film). I'm looking to get a lots of movement, plus a reasonably light-ish package that it would be possible to go on short hikes with. Also would like a large lens board for big, heavy lenses.

I have been thinking along the lines of either a Century Universal, Kodak Master View, or maybe an Ansco 8x10. (Deardorff probably a bit too expensive).

So, with these cameras in mind, am I really just looking at the US market?

djdister
13-Nov-2014, 05:57
Not really. It depends somewhat on how much of a hurry you are in to get one, but we have seen used 8x10 cameras from EU forum members, as well as on ebay. A bit of research and patience on your part should pay off nicely.

Dan Fromm
13-Nov-2014, 07:35
Look on ebay.de. I just took a quick look, found a Canham Traditional, a Plabel Peco Profia, a wooden reisekamera, a Toyo 810MII, a Bermpohl, another big old wooden camera, a Sinar P, a monster studio camera, a Horseman, more old wooden cameras, ...

Remember that 18x24 is another way of saying 8x10.

Domingo A. Siliceo
13-Nov-2014, 07:48
Take a look if you want at Manual Camera

https://www.facebook.com/manual.camera?fref=ts

He is in Spain but speaks english.

MilamBardo
13-Nov-2014, 10:41
Hey, fantastic - thanks for all of the replies! I have looked on German ebay before, but I guess I was scared off by potentially not being able to ask the correct questions due to language barriers. But I guess there is always google translate! Also, I'll take a look at "Manual Camera" once I'm back from work.

I'm not in a major hurry to acquire, but I've have been researching for a few months now, so am ready to take the plunge. I'm just coming straight up from digital. I know the recommendation will be to go 4x5 first (or even medium format), but I definitely want to shoot plates at some point, and, in terms of film, will look to get a 4x5 reducing back whilst I practice.

IanG
13-Nov-2014, 12:05
Not many 10x8 cameras were made after WWII in the UK and pre-WWII British plate cameras took book-form plate holders except the British made Kodak Whole plate cameras. Be aware that only modern continental 18x24 cameras use International DDS (film holders) older cameras use book-form holders.

If you want a monorail then De Vere's Cambo's, Toyo's, Sinar's etc are plentiful here, field cameras are rarer, few get listed on Ebay. I bought an Agfa Ansco Commercial View from the US, but you need to be careful and check what movements they have, some have no front tilt and only slight rear tilt.

Alternately you can look or a more modern camera 10x8 Wista's and Ebont=y's, etc do appear on the Forums occasionally in the UK. If you import from the US allow about 35% extra for all the taxes as there's Import duty and VAT to pay on the item & shipping as well as a charge to collect it by Parcel Force !!!!

Ian

Steven Tribe
13-Nov-2014, 12:18
I think starting with 4x5 can be a bit of a dead end. You will need scanning or an enlargers to get prints which are satisfactory.

Staring with 5x7/13x18cm, full plate, 18x24cm or 8x10 gives you better opportunities to get easy positive images that are worth looking at! The older design wooden cameras have the same back for reduced size and need just a carboard/wood insert and a pencil rectangle on the ground glass. And these older wooden/brass cameras have holders that are OK for film, dry and wet plates.

I think most people overestimate the use they will be making of movements (there is a thread on this) and I would recommend (no surprise to oldtimers here!) an 18x24cm or full plate tailboard camera.

Prices for these on ebay (both France and Germany) are "blown-up" but there are other sources.

The illustration is of one sold on Tuesday, this week in Devon (England) on an online/saleroom auction that is probably 13x18 or 5x7" size. Estimate was 20 - 40, but it went for 110 because someone else was interested, unfortunately!

Michael E
14-Nov-2014, 03:12
Remember that 18x24 is another way of saying 8x10.

Not quite. 18x24cm is a bit smaller than 8x10". While international backs accept both formats (different holders/dds), older european 18x24cm cameras will not work with 8x10" film.

toobierandy
14-Nov-2014, 05:49
seen here are a few decent camera, the question is how to be delivered http://claz.org/classifieds?q=8x10+camera

MilamBardo
14-Nov-2014, 13:14
If you want a monorail then De Vere's Cambo's, Toyo's, Sinar's etc are plentiful here, field cameras are rarer, few get listed on Ebay. I bought an Agfa Ansco Commercial View from the US, but you need to be careful and check what movements they have, some have no front tilt and only slight rear tilt.
Ian

Yeah, I wouldn't mind a rail as long as it was light. I came close to getting an Arca Swiss on auction, but it went for 700, and was an older version with no distinguishing model number. Weight is a concern, and I was unable to find anything with regards to how heavy these were in the past.

So, primarily I'm looking for a field camera I think.

MilamBardo
14-Nov-2014, 13:22
I think starting with 4x5 can be a bit of a dead end. You will need scanning or an enlargers to get prints which are satisfactory.
I think most people overestimate the use they will be making of movements (there is a thread on this) and I would recommend (no surprise to oldtimers here!) an 18x24cm or full plate tailboard camera.


I imagine this is probably true, but I think part of the excitement of going large format is the chance to work with movements and see what can be done! If I had enough money, I think I would get a normal 8x10 for film, and a older, more gorgeous camera for plate! Just out of interest, it there a reason why you would recommend a tailboard over other styles of pre-1900 cameras?

Robert Opheim
14-Nov-2014, 15:09
MilamBardo,

I have bought on E-bay Germany a couple of times and I used the word translator either in word or on the net. I typically buy from stores or sellers with a large number of sells and perfect ratings. I have had a couple of problems with small sellers with bad products: a 4 3/8" American dagor lens with fungus, and a bent 16x20 4 blade summons omega easel. Because I purchased through Paypal both went back and my money was returned - I did have to pay for the return shipping.

MilamBardo
14-Nov-2014, 16:28
Thanks, Robert - I'll keep this in mind. Would you normally ask the seller to send via courier? (rather than normal post?)

Steven Tribe
14-Nov-2014, 16:32
" ....is there a reason why you would recommend a tailboard over other styles of pre-1900 cameras?"

- availability (in Europe).
- price - helped by the fact that most have just the retail outlets name on them, that is, "no-name". Apart from Gandolfi's model!
- variety of size available (9x12, 10x15, 13x18, 18x24, 24x30, 30x40, 40x50 and 50x60 cm, plus UK made (in 1/4 plate up to 12x10 and 15x12").
- condition. Unlike a lot of english style field cameras, these have remained in storage from early in the 20th century.
- Simplicity of controls.
- Very solid front standard which allows use of heavy and wide lenses.
- Many square bellows are prepared for use as stereo cameras using a single lens.
- Most have book plate holders which are suitable for alternative plate photography.