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gmfotografie
12-Nov-2014, 23:35
Hello my friends,

I want to buy a 8x10 Kamera but Im not sure which company guarantee me a well build Camera.
Especially the construction of the groundglas level matching the filmplane (Filmholder) for sharp pictures unsettles me.
I read a lot of posts where this is also be a quality factor of a good build camera.

I will use the Camera only for Landscape Photography from about 120mm to 300mm...but I think I will use 150mm and a 300mm lenses.

What do you think about it... Can you give me some tipps?


Best Michael

angusparker
12-Nov-2014, 23:45
If you are wanting a field camera for portability and something well made I'd go Chamonix 8x10. Lots of cheaper but heavier monorail cameras available if you want more precise movements but that is sort of unnecessary if you are landscape focused.

Randy Moe
12-Nov-2014, 23:56
How about Lotus?
http://www.lotusviewcamera.at/cameras/lovica_8x10_e.html

Michael E
13-Nov-2014, 01:50
Especially the construction of the groundglas level matching the filmplane (Filmholder) for sharp pictures unsettles me.

What kind of holders will you use? I think warped film is a bigger problem than manufacturing tolerances on the camera back. Besides, landscapes are usually shot at f32 or smaller, so depth of focus is your friend.

gorsescent
13-Nov-2014, 04:01
Hello. You might get a better result if you purchase a used camera manufactured by a reliable camera manufacturer rather than a brand new but cheap camera.

In my case, I couldn't afford a brand new camera manufactured by a famous company such as Sinar and Deardorff. Instead, I purchased a used monorail 8X10 camera manufactured by Plaubel (Makina Profia 8x10). It may not be a famous camera manufacturer but their cameras are very well made. I obtained the camera for a good price (under $1000).

http://www.vipcamera.jp/data/biff/product/20130506_9eebe3.jpg

I've been very satisfied with the camera. I've used long exposures 2 times with it (longer than 60 seconds). During the exposure, the camera didn't move at all.

Andrew Plume
13-Nov-2014, 04:10
How about Lotus?
http://www.lotusviewcamera.at/cameras/lovica_8x10_e.html

great Cameras but at a great big price

andrew

Andrew Plume
13-Nov-2014, 04:11
Hello. You might get a better result if you purchase a used camera manufactured by a reliable camera manufacturer rather than a brand new but cheap camera.

In my case, I couldn't afford a brand new camera manufactured by a famous company such as Sinar and Deardorff. Instead, I purchased a used monorail 8X10 camera manufactured by Plaubel (Makina Profia 8x10). It may not be a famous camera manufacturer but their cameras are very well made. I obtained the camera for a good price (under $1000).

http://www.vipcamera.jp/data/biff/product/20130506_9eebe3.jpg

I've been very satisfied with the camera. I've used long exposures 2 times with it (longer than 60 seconds). During the exposure, the camera didn't move at all.

yes, I have another, that's a different 10 x 8 Plaubel model, terrific indeed, really solid but way more of a Studio type than one for getting out and about with

andrew

djdister
13-Nov-2014, 05:22
Since it sounds like you are new to 8x10 photography, I would recommend starting out with a used 8x10. If you go used, you can find some good deals on some of the best name brands out there in that size. Do more reading and research first.

vinny
13-Nov-2014, 06:38
What kind of holders will you use? I think warped film is a bigger problem than manufacturing tolerances on the camera back. Besides, landscapes are usually shot at f32 or smaller, so depth of focus is your friend.

Depth of field and depth of focus aren't the same thing.

Ari
13-Nov-2014, 06:46
You can't go wrong with metal; a Toyo 810M (first generation) can be had for about $1200-$1800, and Toyo 8x10 holders are the best.

ic-racer
13-Nov-2014, 07:22
Any used camera will be suspect to issues. If you are looking at a new camera, anything from the major brands will be fine (Ebony, Toyo, Canham, Shen-Hao, Chamnonix, Deardorff, etc.)

There are a few new design 8x10 cameras out there. Although they look fine, if you don't have experience with other 8x10 cameras, I'd search this forum for hands-on experience before being the first person to get one. For example here is a review of a new 8x10 from Poland: http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?114719-New-production-8X10-field-camera-from-Poland&p=1164028&viewfull=1#post1164028

John Kasaian
13-Nov-2014, 07:39
Do you have a preference for wood or metal? Monorail or folding?
Some guys use the 8x10 Sinar in the field. One of our Mods here takes incredibly beautiful landscapes with a Tachihara 8x10.
I really enjoy working with my old V8 Deardorff.
Chaminoix (sp?) and Shen Haos have a fierce following. If portability is consideration #1, Gowland made a Pocket monorail 8x10 and Nagaoka made a very lightweight clamshell design.
Any quality wood field camera should have a well regulated film plane with the ground glass. It is easy enough to check the registration with a depth gauge.
There is a lot to choose from.

Michael Graves
13-Nov-2014, 08:38
I'd see if Richard Ritter can make you one. If I ever get a new 8x10 to replace my Toyo 810M, I'm hoping for one of these. I've seen his cameras up close and personal and they are nothing short of amazing.

http://www.lg4mat.net/LFcamera.html

dasBlute
13-Nov-2014, 09:05
Depth of field and depth of focus aren't the same thing.

Indeed, but I think he was implying that the depth-of-focus would reduce the problems with film flatness, would you disagree?

Jon Shiu
13-Nov-2014, 09:11
Check out Arca Swiss camera. Very smooth and precise and also light weight.

Jon

Jac@stafford.net
13-Nov-2014, 09:28
Depth of field and depth of focus aren't the same thing.

True, of course, but they both increase as the aperture becomes physically smaller. Perhaps you can help with this question. Does not depth-of-focus increase more to the rear of the film plane?

gmfotografie
13-Nov-2014, 16:25
thank you all !
very interesting and helpful answers.

a deardorff, ebony and lotus are very beautiful cameras.. but there are also a lot of cheaper cameras which are also quite good; i know this.
some experts write, that meassuring with a depth gauge, isnt very accurate to check the filmplane and groundglas postion.. only with special meassurements systems it is possible; and thats expensive...by the way, i dont want to go to deep into such technical questions.

If I choose a good quality camera, mentioned in this thread, i cannot make a misstake.. is this so okay ?

best michael

Alan Gales
13-Nov-2014, 16:54
There is a huge price spread in 8x10 cameras. You can buy a new Ebony for $10,000.00 U.S. or an old used wooden tailboard camera for less than $500.00 U.S.

If you tell us your price range it would really help to narrow it down a bit. :)

Tim Meisburger
13-Nov-2014, 17:02
To answer your question: yes, if you buy a good quality camera you cannot make a mistake. They are all very good and will do what you need.

Michael E
13-Nov-2014, 17:23
Depth of field and depth of focus aren't the same thing.

Correct.


Indeed, but I think he was implying that the depth-of-focus would reduce the problems with film flatness, would you disagree?

And problems with ground glass/film plane deviation, too. I was just suggesting that typical landscape apertures will hide anything but major measurement flaws. There are more important issues when choosing a LF camera, handling of the camera among the most important (and most underrated).

John Bowen
13-Nov-2014, 17:26
If you contact Richard Ritter www.lg4mat.net he can both manufacture you a camera and the holders. He makes wonderful cameras.....I think enough of them to own three (7x17, 8x10 & 5x7)

Good luck and welcome to large format!

mdarnton
13-Nov-2014, 19:59
I seriously doubt that the question about old cameras having an improper placement of the ground glass relative to new ones is a real issue. I would certainly not make my decision based on this, and actually, I didn't make my decisions based on this. I have five old cameras and two new ones, and none of them has a problem. It's really not that hard for a maker to get this right, and if it's wrong, it's not that hard to set it right. Better to focus on other, more important, issues.

Jac@stafford.net
14-Nov-2014, 17:16
a deardorff, ebony and lotus are very beautiful cameras...

Sometimes I regret getting a Deardorff V8 because it put on weight over the years.


some experts write, that meassuring with a depth gauge, isn't very accurate to check the filmplane and groundglas postion..

An adequate caliper gauge with depth capability and a straight edge suffices. Rather than getting into 'how to' which you can find, I will agree that finding an improperly registered ground glass is really disappointing. Had a Linhof that way because the previous replaced the ground glass without shims.

gmfotografie
15-Nov-2014, 00:23
Budget 3500-4500 $
Im actually using a 4x5" camera from chamonix and i like it.... but a 8x10 is another level i think so...
(I use a nikkor 300mm nikkor f9 as a normal lens; adding a 210mm lens later.)
by the way... this one looks amazing: http://www.deardorffcameras.com/products-page/deardorff-cameras/4x5-special-deardorff-view-camera-duplicate-3/

Roger Thoms
15-Nov-2014, 05:32
by the way... this one looks amazing: http://www.deardorffcameras.com/products-page/deardorff-cameras/4x5-special-deardorff-view-camera-duplicate-3/

Be cautious with that one. http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?84992-Where-s-Deardorff-and-Barry-Cochran&highlight=Cochran

Roger

Andrew Plume
15-Nov-2014, 05:50
Budget 3500-4500 $
Im actually using a 4x5" camera from chamonix and i like it.... but a 8x10 is another level i think so...
(I use a nikkor 300mm nikkor f9 as a normal lens; adding a 210mm lens later.)
by the way... this one looks amazing: http://www.deardorffcameras.com/products-page/deardorff-cameras/4x5-special-deardorff-view-camera-duplicate-3/

pm sent

andrew

Shootar401
15-Nov-2014, 15:35
I've only owned one 8x10 a B&J. I can't speak for other makes and models but mine is a 50's era battleship grey beast. Seems like its indestructible, but also heavy so it doesn't travel far away from the car. Then again I only paid $250 for it with 11 film holders, 5x7 back and a lens. Not going to complain.

gorsescent
16-Nov-2014, 01:59
Budget 3500-4500 $
Im actually using a 4x5" camera from chamonix and i like it.... but a 8x10 is another level i think so...
(I use a nikkor 300mm nikkor f9 as a normal lens; adding a 210mm lens later.)
by the way... this one looks amazing: http://www.deardorffcameras.com/products-page/deardorff-cameras/4x5-special-deardorff-view-camera-duplicate-3/

I wish I could purchase a Deardorff V8. It looks so beautiful. It seems that many photographers who buy it don't regret their decision later.

MIke Sherck
16-Nov-2014, 08:23
Go with Lotus. That way, if you're unhappy you can camp on their doorstep until they get it right.

But, Lotus has a reputation for getting it right. Of course, you pay for that... :)

gmfotografie
16-Nov-2014, 08:46
hmmm and lotus is a few kilometeres away from me....maybe i will knock on their doors soon....

Michal Makowski
22-Nov-2014, 06:36
Svedovsky 8x10 camera! Over half a price of Lotus. Only 1800$ with 2 lens boards. And in Europe.

Deval
26-Nov-2014, 04:37
Quick question to the original poster. Have you shot large format before?

Lenny Eiger
26-Nov-2014, 12:23
Hello my friends,

I want to buy a 8x10 Kamera but Im not sure which company guarantee me a well build Camera.
Especially the construction of the groundglas level matching the filmplane (Filmholder) for sharp pictures unsettles me.
I read a lot of posts where this is also be a quality factor of a good build camera.

I will use the Camera only for Landscape Photography from about 120mm to 300mm...but I think I will use 150mm and a 300mm lenses.

What do you think about it... Can you give me some tipps?


Best Michael

This is a great place to buy used cameras in great condition. i saw a Canham 8x10 recently in the sale section, as well as a Chamonix. All of the camera companies that build 8x10 today will guarantee you a well built camera. Canham, Ebony, Lotus, Chamonix, etc.

I like wood, it's light enough to carry around... and I do like to go a fair distance from the car...

Lenny

Luis-F-S
26-Nov-2014, 18:35
Quick question to the original poster. Have you shot large format before?

I suspect you already know the answer to that question.........L

gmfotografie
30-Nov-2014, 00:34
yes, i used to shoot in 4x5 " with a chamonix ... i like it but want to get bigger :-)

Alan Gales
30-Nov-2014, 00:44
yes, i used to shoot in 4x5 " with a chamonix ... i like it but want to get bigger :-)

If you like the 4x5 Chamonix then you would probably like the 8x10 Chamonix as well. I would also look at the Ritter. I shoot a Wehman but they are no longer in production and only occasionally show up on the used market.

plaubel
30-Nov-2014, 03:10
Hello, Michael,

why do you want to use 8x10" ?

I guess, the great quality may one point, and if I want to reach this quality, for me there are 4 necessarities :
using a perfect lens, controlling sharpness with a magnifier, using a good filmholder and a flat sheet, maybe fixed onto the holder with something, and, of cause, a groundglass right in position.
Oh, I forgot the tripod...

For me, Large Format has something to do with quality and precision.
Your question about the position of the groundglass is a good one to me, because f/32 can't be the medicine against unsharpness.

Otherwise, a professional ground glass check would not be too expensive, so if I had to look for a camera, other aspects would be more important to me.
Weight,which concerns the tripod too, handling,total quality if camera is second hand, and the fastness of the system for example.

I believe, that max. precision is garanteed by using a mono rail.
But using 4x5" and 5x7", I decided to stay at home with my Plaubel Profias; outdor I prefer wooden cams like Shen Hao. More practicable then, and checking the groundglass gives enough quality to me.

In using 8x10", weight may loose importance in comparison with wooden cams - an 8x10 Profia weights "only" around 6Kg. And is still available for 3300 Euro, excluded taxes :
http://www.plaubel.com/

Bringing the camera on top of the tripod, and the starting time for making the image may be another important point; in my opinion, defolding a wooden cam, positioning the lens, this all needs a minute or two, which may cost the special light ore the fabulous clouds and so on.
A completely mono rail needs seconds for starting off.

But how about the transport?
In my experience, there isn't much fun in riding a bike, with a complete mono rail on my shoulders. Or in carrying a mono rail some 100 meters .
Using a car is another thing, no problem there with heavy stuff.

Like said here before, a folden camera, maybe a metal one, seems to be a good solution, but who knows about your preferences ?

Me, I love to play with the wooden stuff; if I stay in the middle of the botanic, everything feels right to me; this gives a completely other mood /sense than using a more technical version like a mono rail.
Fun and emotion have to to something for me in using LF, too :-)

Cheers,
Ritchie

gmfotografie
28-Dec-2014, 12:33
let me say that i love to have quality build things in my hand. i like handmade things. i like the smell of wood. i like big massive things.

but the most important point is :
the process of taking a photograph is more important (beautiful) for me than doing the postproduction or get the final print in my hand. can you understand me why i want to have a beautiful 8x10 ��

John Kasaian
28-Dec-2014, 14:37
I suggest looking for a well cared for used Deardorff then. It will be cheaper than any new camera mentioned so far and IMHO is a delight to use in the field as well as being extraordinarily beautiful. I've heard that the Gandolfi is much the same, and being in Europe perhaps more widely available than Deardorff.

Jonathan Barlow
28-Dec-2014, 21:47
I have a bunch of 8x10 Deardorffs and yes, they are fun to hold and play with.

Randy Moe
28-Dec-2014, 23:39
I have a bunch of 8x10 Deardorffs and yes, they are fun to hold and play with.

Is a bunch bigger than a pile of cameras?

Can you play house in the pile?