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SpeedGraphicMan
10-Nov-2014, 11:24
Hello all!
I have been shooting 4x5 for about three years now, and all the while collecting equipment for 8x10 photography.
It is my goal now to begin shooting 8x10 within a year, unfortunately, I do not know the difference between so many of the different cameras.
(And frankly I don't see many differences - lol)

I would love to hear some recommendations from you all regarding an 8x10 I might be able to acquire inexpensively. (Not really seeking to spend more than $400).

I would be using this primarily for shooting portraits in a studio.

Jonathan Barlow
10-Nov-2014, 11:30
The Kodak 2-D camera is one of the few 8x10's in the $400 range.

neil poulsen
10-Nov-2014, 11:39
Another possibility might be a Burke and James.

Be careful on the Kodak 2D's. I had one where the bellows were tight enough that with any significant rise, the top of the bellows would cast a shadow on the negative. Someone else indicated they'd had the same problem with a 2D.

Vaughn
10-Nov-2014, 11:40
The completed listings on eBay for Kodak 2D 8x10's seem to hover around your price point (no lens). Great cameras, tho one needs to be careful about their condition as that can range all over the place. The extension rail is nice to have for longer lenses or close-ups, but one can live without it with 'normal' lenses. But for $400, one is talking fairly old cameras.

The Calumet C1 can sometimes be had in your price range, too. As an example only (I have no connection with this sale). http://www.ebay.com/itm/Calumet-C1-8x10-View-Camera/371183902059?_trksid=p2047675.c100011.m1850&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D27538%26meid%3D98d8a11b6b994bdda6ccec21e353479b%26pid%3D100011%26prg%3D11353%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D10%26sd%3D271571206260

Start keeping an eye out for holders! Nice modern ones hover around $50, older wood ones usually less. Keep an eye out for someone here selling 5 or 6 -- nice number to start out with.

logan.egbert
10-Nov-2014, 12:59
The Agfa-Anasco 8x10 can also be had for around $400 w/o a Lens. I paid just over $280 for mine.

djdister
10-Nov-2014, 13:28
Burke and James 8x10 Grover - monorail or folder. Here's the monorail version...

124898

Jac@stafford.net
10-Nov-2014, 13:34
The Calumet C1 can sometimes be had in your price range, too. As an example only (I have no connection with this sale). http://www.ebay.com/itm/Calumet-C1-8x10-View-Camera/371183902059?_trksid=p2047675.c100011.m1850&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D27538%26meid%3D98d8a11b6b994bdda6ccec21e353479b%26pid%3D100011%26prg%3D11353%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D10%26sd%3D271571206260

OP: I have the same Calumet C1 shown in the link. It has become my favorite 8x10 (and I have Deardorff and Century 1 8x10s as well). It is very stable, rugged, reliable, easy to deploy, and as odd as it might seem, the black finish is easily flaked off with a bump or two so the advantage is that it shows its use. The one in that link looks darned good. Oh, one plastic knob has a little piece broken off. The all seem to have that. No harm in function.

Best of luck in your search!

Will Frostmill
10-Nov-2014, 14:46
Am I right in believing that the wooden 8x10 holders are not usually all to the same spec? Different T-distances on Kodak 2D's, Ansco's, and the like?

richardman
10-Nov-2014, 14:57
Funny I am in the exact same position. Why do larger format such a siren's call?!! :-)

Although I am thinking of doing "on location" 8x10 Impossible Instant film portraits. May be tintype collodian, but that's another step....

djdister
10-Nov-2014, 16:00
Why not buy this one from a forum member for $300?

http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?117538-FS-Orbit-Calumet-C-8x10-with-4x5-reducing-back

richardman
10-Nov-2014, 16:06
I am considering it

contact@kurtay.eu
10-Nov-2014, 16:07
Hi, it depends what you are intending to use it for. Think carefully, because you are gonna end up carrying it or leaving it only at the home/studio etc! Unlike 4x5, you are going to need more room and strong assistant or back to be mobile. I have a Rajah - Indian version of Deardorff! A copy but a very good one indeed for a fraction of the original. But they are not easy to find! Good luck! [emoji6]

djdister
10-Nov-2014, 16:09
Hi, it depends what you are intending to use it for. Think carefully, because you are gonna end up carrying it or leaving it only at the home/studio etc! Unlike 4x5, you are going to need more room and strong assistant or back to be mobile. I have a Rajah - Indian version of Deardorff! A copy but a very good one indeed for a fraction of the original. But they are not easy to find! Good luck! [emoji6]

The OP said he intends to use it for studio portraits, so if that is the case, weight won't be much of an issue.

contact@kurtay.eu
10-Nov-2014, 16:10
Okay then, I didn't see that. But in any case, worth considering! Best!

mdarnton
10-Nov-2014, 17:57
I don't know why people prefer plastic holders--maybe it's just something about the romance of plastic. :-) The specs are the same if you buy ones that aren't prehistoric, and you can get GREAT deals. They weigh less than plastic, and they wear better. I've got all wood, and every one is near brand new. Most of them cost me around $20-25 each. Try that with plastic.

Old-N-Feeble
10-Nov-2014, 18:03
And plastic attracts dust far more than wood...

joselsgil
10-Nov-2014, 23:56
Am I right in believing that the wooden 8x10 holders are not usually all to the same spec? Different T-distances on Kodak 2D's, Ansco's, and the like?

Some 8X10 holders are made for plate holders, but can be fitted to hold film. However, they are thicker than the standard film holder.

goamules
11-Nov-2014, 14:20
I like wood too. But wood becomes unglued, can warp, and generates dust from deterioration. Try that with plastic!

Old-N-Feeble
11-Nov-2014, 14:39
I like wood too. But wood becomes unglued, can warp, and generates dust from deterioration. Try that with plastic!

Plastic can become unglued and warped too. The one thing plastic has going for it is (maybe) less warpage due to humidity but this is mitigated via good design and construction.

jp
11-Nov-2014, 15:23
We've got humidity here for the warmer months. So plastic makes good sense for me. When wooden holders are humid, the darkslides get too tight.

The linked one for sale would be good. B&J has good options; monorail or rembrandt. C1 is good. I don't know if the 8x10's are this way, but Sinar 4x5's are dirt cheap. OLD kodak/century cameras are pretty affordable too and made for the studio, but won't have tripod screws; made for stands with tables.

goamules
11-Nov-2014, 16:03
Oh yeah, add the too tight darkslide problem. And since I wetplate with a lot of my cameras, and silver nitrate stains wood, plastic is better there too.

Jac@stafford.net
11-Nov-2014, 16:19
Be careful on the Kodak 2D's. I had one where the bellows were tight enough that with any significant rise, the top of the bellows would cast a shadow on the negative.

My Century 1 has a tab to lift the bellows. I am beginning to suspect a previous owner made a modification. No?

gleaf
12-Nov-2014, 20:41
What sort of lens are you contemplating? If you are thinking "Big Glass" then weight on the front standard is an issue with old light construction as Century universals. If you go more modern metal a good start point is the Calumet C-1. Not graceful or wonderful. Just heavy duty 18 pounds of aluminum.. Do you have a time table for the adventure jumping off event?

ImSoNegative
12-Nov-2014, 21:00
Dan I was getting ready to say the same thing, what a deal on that C1