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john reed
23-Jun-2014, 09:27
We are going to Yellowstone/Grand Tetons in the middle of July and I'm, of course, taking my Sinar F1 along for the ride. I've perused the forum entries for topics on these locations and have come away with the impression that I'm heading into the National Park's version of Shinjuku Station at rush hour. I've talked my long suffering wife into getting a ridiculously early start to beat the crowds but, since we're at the West entrance, this tactic will only cover the Old Faithful and canyon areas, I'd like some advice as to what other LF photogenic areas of the Park would be less populated later in the day (like say 8:00 AM on). We only have three days so I have to make them count.

Thanks for your help,

jr

Heroique
23-Jun-2014, 10:01
8:00 a.m. is pre-crowd, but not for long.

If you can possibly manage it, best is 6:00 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. the park is yours alone at every mud pot and fumarole.

It's also "best" because in summer, Yellowstone light is magical at this time.

If it has to be 8:00 a.m. or later as you describe, the further away your photo area is from park entrances, camp sites, and the Lodge, the better!

goamules
23-Jun-2014, 10:54
The nice thing is it's a huge park, with several roads leading into different directions. That helps dilute the crowds.

Jim Noel
23-Jun-2014, 12:26
Although there are thousands of people in the park at any one time, I have never had a problem using LF equipment.

Light Guru
23-Jun-2014, 13:40
I've talked my long suffering wife into getting a ridiculously early start to beat the crowds but, since we're at the West entrance, this tactic will only cover the Old Faithful and canyon areas

The other areas of the park don't get as busy so you would have more time in the AM before they start to get crowds.

lenser
23-Jun-2014, 14:22
I remember mid summer several years ago walking across the parking lot from Old Faithful Inn to the geyser at about 6:00AM. I was totally alone except for a car circling the parking lot who oddly enough turned out to be a friend from my home town half a continent away. Anyway, no one was around the Old Faithful site for about the next half hour and then only a handful of other visitors. If you can stay near where you want to shoot and be on site just after sunrise, it may be easy to be alone at even the most visited areas.

Leszek Vogt
23-Jun-2014, 16:38
If the park is is too far away (for some) you can watch it via webcam near the Old Faithful. The geyser doesn't always hit the time mark....the last one was 20 min late (or too early for the next spouting).

http://www.nps.gov/features/yell/webcam/oldFaithfulStreaming.html

I think you'll gain lots of elbow room if you go another time like Sept/Oct.

Les

goamules
24-Jun-2014, 18:26
I concur that the early bird gets the worm. I've always been an early riser, and never am I up later than any single person in any in camp. Same was true my recent National parks trip, I'd be up a 5:00AM, heave out and trice up, and be sitting in a camp chair with a book and a sleeping bag draped over me. Only hours later would the other camps start moving. If you want to take pictures, that's the time to do it, at dawn. Most tourists sleep til 7 or 8.

john reed
25-Jun-2014, 07:41
Thanks for the help folks. It will be early to rise and hit the road (my wife has offered to truncate her normal morning ritual... a greater sacrifice could not be asked). I'll post anything that looks good.

Dakotah: any idea where I can rent a bear?

jr

David Schaller
25-Jun-2014, 09:09
I also found that if you can walk more than half a mile from the trailheads, most of the tourists have turned back. Not so easy with the Sinar perhaps, but the farther you can walk away from the parking lot, the more solitude you will have.
Dave

Kevin J. Kolosky
25-Jun-2014, 09:22
Just as important as time and crowds is weather. You have to be flexible and ready to change plans depending of the weather. If you shooting grand vistas in black and white you are generally going to want some clouds.

Make sure to stop and check out Ansel's tripod holes overlooking the Snake River and the Grand Tetons. Hope that when you do there are some clouds in the sky.

dtheld
25-Jun-2014, 10:36
For bear rentals, I would suggest that you check out these two vendors:

West Yellowstone - Grizzlies-r-us
Cody - Grr's rent a bear :rolleyes:

Enjoy Yellowstone. It's a great place to visit. If you can, try to take a few of the Ranger tours (free). They take a bit of walking, but you are with a limited group so you will have less problems with the masses. Check with the Rangers at Old Faithful for more info.

Dave

john reed
26-Jun-2014, 11:20
This sounds like a real possibility. I've got he whole rig in a backpack using a Renaissance set up. I did over six miles on Inishmor last month. Not bad for three score and ten.

john reed
26-Jun-2014, 11:28
Just as important as time and crowds is weather. You have to be flexible and ready to change plans depending of the weather. If you shooting grand vistas in black and white you are generally going to want some clouds.

Make sure to stop and check out Ansel's tripod holes overlooking the Snake River and the Grand Tetons. Hope that when you do there are some clouds in the sky.

We're doing a couple of days at GT as well. From what I can see from other people's shots, good photo ops abound! All I have to do is take the shot... right.

Drew Wiley
26-Jun-2014, 11:59
The last time is was in Yellowstone I took the Sinar. I figured if the grizzlies ate me, they could pick their teeth with the rail sections.

Bill_1856
26-Jun-2014, 12:06
[QUOTE=john reed;1148190 my wife has offered to truncate her normal morning ritual... a greater sacrifice could not be asked.[/QUOTE]
John, just keep in mind that there's no such as a "free" lunch!

Drew Wiley
26-Jun-2014, 15:29
I still remember having my 8x10 propped up at the overlook of Blue Mesa in the painted desert (not exactly bear habitat), and the old Brooklyn couple drives up and
walks over: "Whatcha got theah? A deah? A beah?"... "Stupid Photographeah... ain't even no deah or beah."

Kevin J. Kolosky
26-Jun-2014, 16:15
We're doing a couple of days at GT as well. From what I can see from other people's shots, good photo ops abound! All I have to do is take the shot... right.

Well, I wouldn't go that far. Grand Teton National Park is a beautiful place, and there are many places to make photographs.
But as with anything else you will need a bit of luck with the weather and the clouds if you are doing landscapes. My suggestion would be to get up and on the road early, take a nap at noon, and get back to it in the late afternoon when you have that beautiful raking light.

And of course, keep your eyes open and your smaller cameras handy for moose and bears.

Drew Wiley
26-Jun-2014, 16:18
A lot just depends. There can be a lot of smoke in the area in summer - or utterly wonderful clarity. Keeping your eye out for moose also applies to when you're
behind the wheel. I rounded a corner once and a couple of those huge beasts were sleeping on the road.

john reed
26-Jun-2014, 19:39
A lot just depends. There can be a lot of smoke in the area in summer - or utterly wonderful clarity. Keeping your eye out for moose also applies to when you're
behind the wheel. I rounded a corner once and a couple of those huge beasts were sleeping on the road.
We have a few of those fellows in NH. The state issues a bumper sticker:
"Brake for Moose! It could save your life." I shows the level of confidence the state has in general public. Probably warranted.
We still have a few fatalities each year with car versus moose. It's usually ends in a draw. I'll keep a close lookout for the fauna.
The bears I'm used to are the little black ones. They're daunting enough. I think I'll rely on National Geographic for my Grizz encounters.

Richard Johnson
26-Jun-2014, 21:11
From a boardwalk you don't need to have much privacy, just enough room for your tripod. If you walk further, the crowds will be gone automatically.