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Kirk Gittings
31-Jan-2014, 11:52
I get a fair amount of adhesive transfer onto the iron when I tack the print to the backing board via the dry mount tissue. If I don't clean it regularly I it becomes extremely hard. If I don't clean it I get a smudge on when I use it.

I've been cleaning mine by heating it up a aggressively rubbing it off with a paper towel-PITA. There must be a better way. How do you clean yours?

Drew Wiley
31-Jan-2014, 12:01
Most of these irons are either teflon or silicone, so solvent-resistant. Do a little spot test with acetone to be certain. Otherwise, try a film cleaner like PEC.

Kirk Gittings
31-Jan-2014, 12:04
Acetone works on the fresh adhesive but won't seem to make a dent in old stuff.

DannL
31-Jan-2014, 12:18
Wasn't mounting tissue made with shellac? If so, alcohol should do the trick . . . I would think.

ROL
31-Jan-2014, 12:21
Per Drew's counsel, while the iron is still warm. Mine is teflon, and so never loads up as yours (I do however employ a rather light touch with these things). If yours is a non–coated oldie, it might be worth investing in a new one before they're made illegal*.
















* so this photo store employee looks at my prints and exclaims in horror, "You're not dry mounting these!" Sorry, its only recently become clear to me how unprofessional it is of me to dry mount – pigment print technologies having having driven everything photographic.

Drew Wiley
31-Jan-2014, 12:43
Yes... warm the iron to low temp. Use a FINE nylon scrubber (I use white)- something suitable for safely scrubbing teflon fry pans, for example, but not with any
kind of sponge backing or filler susceptible to acetone. If that doesn't work, there is a safe citrus-based solvent called De-Solv-It, which you can apply and let sit
for about 20min to a cold iron, then scrub with the nylon pad. But it leaves a residue, so rinse this off afterwards with denatured alcohol. I do not know the exact
current composition of Colormount. I've been told it's no longer simple shellac; but I personally haven't had any trouble removing either it or acrylic based adhesives
using the products described above. Hope this helps.

Sal Santamaura
31-Jan-2014, 14:02
Mine is teflon-coated, but still picks up residue from Colormount. I don't let that happen. A clean sheet of plain white paper is kept on the counter. Each time the iron is dragged across tissue, I immediately wipe off the residue on that scrap paper. Always use a clean spot on the paper.

As with most things, ongoing maintenance is easier than "repairs." :)

Kirk Gittings
31-Jan-2014, 14:04
Sal that is a great idea. Its so obvious that I'm embarrassed to say I never thought of it.

Randy Moe
31-Jan-2014, 14:11
My company used to make/sell a white spray on dry teflon, worked well on many things, if you can find it and perhaps coat or recoat your iron. I'm hoping to find my can and fix my scratched tacking iron.

They were absorbed by Loctite, who promptly discontinued many popular big sellers.

Maybe it can be found. It was sort of like this, http://www.amazon.com/DuPont-Non-Stick-Dry-Film-Lubricant-Aerosol/dp/B003UTX0R8/ref=pd_sxp_f_pt

Drew Wiley
31-Jan-2014, 14:15
I actually never get adhesive on the iron from drymounting, due to the way I use it. But I have sometimes borrowed it for cabinet shop application of heat-seal
shellac glues where it did get contaminated and need to be cleaned. When I tack the tissue to the back of the print, I always have a little piece of silicone release
paper in between (But never use this method on the face of the print, or a little bit of shiny residue might transfer to the emulsion). My own drymounting method
is a lot more clean and efficient than the traditional one shown in most books, and I have taught it to a number of people. But basically, the tissue is briefly tacked to the back of a predryed print with release paper in between , then the whole tissue is pressed dead flat on the print between a ragboard sandwich, with a full sheet of release paper between the mtg tissue and board... But it's important that no tissue overlaps and can adhere to the top board. This is then removed, cooled under the pressure glass, then trimmed to final size. After that, mounting and pressing to the final board (also predried), between the ragboard sandwich, and under the pressure glass again.

Randy Moe
31-Jan-2014, 14:31
Yep.

evan clarke
31-Jan-2014, 17:07
I keep my little pcs of mat board and draw it across the sharp edge..works well. Can tjrow them away..

Sal Santamaura
31-Jan-2014, 23:26
...Its so obvious that I'm embarrassed to say I never thought of it.Don't be embarrassed. You've spent your career making pictures. I spent mine being an engineer. When it comes to prints worthy of dry mounting in the first place, your expertise is undoubtedly more valuable than my little "trick." :)

Ron McElroy
31-Jan-2014, 23:28
Like Drew I don't get the tissue stuck to the iron. I learned drymounting ages ago in working in the picture framing business. At that time we didn't use a tacking iron, but instead would use a corner of the press itself to tack tissue to a piece. I always have used a small piece of release paper between the iron and tissue to tack the tissue to the back of a print I'm mounting.

Mark Sampson
1-Feb-2014, 10:27
I'm surprised. Does no one else besides me and Mr. McElroy use a bit of silicone-treated release paper between the tacking iron and the tissue? I've done that for a very long time, and use a full sheet of release paper between the print and the press platen. If the iron and the platen don't get dirty, you don't have to clean them.

Randy Moe
1-Feb-2014, 12:29
Nothing gets in my pristine press without release paper and clean smooth matt boards.

I have seen too many destroyed presses.


I'm surprised. Does no one else besides me and Mr. McElroy use a bit of silicone-treated release paper between the tacking iron and the tissue? I've done that for a very long time, and use a full sheet of release paper between the print and the press platen. If the iron and the platen don't get dirty, you don't have to clean them.

Ginette
1-Feb-2014, 15:40
Seal offer small jar of cleaner : Bienfang / Seal Platen Cleaner for Dry Mount Heat Presses, 2 Oz. Jar. But not cheap...
But the best way to not have to clean is to use small part of release paper for your tacking iron. You mark the side you used or you throw them away after use.

Chauncey Walden
2-Feb-2014, 11:27
What Mark said.