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h2oman
25-Jul-2013, 17:45
I'm looking for a way to get my camera up to about 10 feet, stabilized. One option would be something like Frank is using in post #17 here:

http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?75204-Post-Photos-of-YOURSELF-with-your-camera&p=717229&viewfull=1#post717229

Does anyone know the make and model of that tripod (in the first image)? I think it is a Gitzo...

...someone was selling one here a few years back, and I'm kicking myself for not purchasing it. Are there other options, like some sort of clamp on a fairly solid ladder?

Otto Seaman
25-Jul-2013, 18:14
Gee it just so happens that I just posted an ad for a 118" tall Gitzo in the classifieds....

I hope Frank didn't fall off that ladder. Hell of a great guy, he's missed....

Jac@stafford.net
25-Jul-2013, 18:27
A local studio does very large group pictures in one of our parks with with an 8x10 camera
on a hefty tripod with its legs stuck into long aluminum pipes. The photographer stands on
a ladder at least 12 feet from the ground.

vinny
25-Jul-2013, 18:40
Orchard ladders are plentiful out west on craigslist. Or buy one new for a couple hundred bucks.
I built an 11ft pod using schedule 40 aluminum pipe. There are pics posted here somewhere.

Photojeep
25-Jul-2013, 20:12
About 8 years ago I had to get my 4x5 up about 10 or so feet high and I used my Bogen tripod, the one with cine double upper legs with leg extensions. I don't remember the model number of the tripod but it had removable feet which allowed the use of accessory leg extensions. Between the leg extensions and extending the center column, I was able to get it up about 10 feet. I'm a fan of Gitzo tripods but didn't have one at the time but it was affordable.

Best,
Photojeep

h2oman
25-Jul-2013, 20:34
Thanks for the ideas, folks. After Vinny said he had posted a photo somewhere I did the search that I should have done rather than starting a new thread. There were a number of interesting ides plus a very funny photo posted by Merg Ross.

Alan Gales
25-Jul-2013, 20:40
If it's a one time deal then rent a scissors lift.

jonreid
25-Jul-2013, 22:06
Gee it just so happens that I just posted an ad for a 118" tall Gitzo in the classifieds....

I hope Frank didn't fall off that ladder. Hell of a great guy, he's missed....

Careful Otto, you start another interminable 'bring-back-Frank-thread'...

J

Jerry Bodine
25-Jul-2013, 23:03
I'm looking for a way to get my camera up to about 10 feet, stabilized. One option would be something like Frank is using in post #17 here:

http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?75204-Post-Photos-of-YOURSELF-with-your-camera&p=717229&viewfull=1#post717229

Does anyone know the make and model of that tripod (in the first image)? I think it is a Gitzo...


It's an aluminum Gitzo all right. Series 5 Tele-Studex Giant, Model 390, like mine, 5-section legs, #525 3-way pan-tilt head. Other possible use: axle support for a jacked-up SUV. :)

Lachlan 717
26-Jul-2013, 00:59
The 161MkII is the tallest Manfrotto. Just a bit shorter than the 10' you quoted.

Heroique
26-Jul-2013, 04:35
Here are several ideas at work.

That’s Norman McGrath getting high.

From his (excellent) book Photographing Buildings Inside and Out.

Greg Davis
26-Jul-2013, 06:28
I use a Manfrotto 161MkII and the camera is just about 10 feet high after full extension and including the 3 way head.

Kirk Gittings
26-Jul-2013, 06:52
Gordon Hutchins used a three legged tree ladder with his tripod head mounted on the ladder.http://www.sherrilltree.com/Professional-Gear/Ladders

Drew Bedo
28-Jul-2013, 13:27
Cut sections of PVC pipe to extend the legs of your tallest tripod. . . .I've never had to do this, but it would be a lower-end approach.

Michael Cienfuegos
31-Jul-2013, 17:25
Cut sections of PVC pipe to extend the legs of your tallest tripod. . . .I've never had to do this, but it would be a lower-end approach.

None of you guys are working safe. I agree with the rental of a scissorlift. Much better than going into the hole off a clumsy ladder.

vinny
31-Jul-2013, 19:10
a scissorlift has very limit uses. sure it'll go high, but....
on uneven ground it's useless
on just about anything other than level concrete, it's useless
will get stuck in anything other than concrete if you don't get a gas powered 4x4 model
requires an insurance policy
technically requires safety training to operate
if you've never worn the safety harness that comes with it, good phucking luck putting it on:)

my giant tripod requires a ladder or car to stand on which isn't ideal either

ghostcount
1-Aug-2013, 17:07
99587

Great for un-even ground but you gotta' stay still before you hit the shutter or else the whole truck moves.

Not practical indoors. ;)

Jim Galli
1-Aug-2013, 17:18
99587

Great for un-even ground but you gotta' stay still before you hit the shutter or else the whole truck moves.

Not practical indoors. ;)

Yep, that's how I do it. Good enough for Ansel, good enough for me.

And...btw...we have to listen to this safety crap all day long at work. A respect of pain has kept me safe enough all these 60 years. I don't need to hear any extra sermons on SAFETY. Sort of sick of it.

:rant-off:

Michael Cienfuegos
1-Aug-2013, 20:55
Yep, that's how I do it. Good enough for Ansel, good enough for me.

And...btw...we have to listen to this safety crap all day long at work. A respect of pain has kept me safe enough all these 60 years. I don't need to hear any extra sermons on SAFETY. Sort of sick of it.

:rant-off:

Sorry about the safety rants. I keep forgetting about the harnesses and all that other crap they make you wear these days, didn't have to when I was working,, just a safety belt. You have to use common sense more than anything else and remember: No one was ever hurt by a fall, it was that sudden stop at the end.

m