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Oren Grad
5-Jun-2013, 22:25
Apologies if this has already sneaked into one or another thread here, but just in case: I went looking for the first time in a while at the web pages for the large format Fujinons on Fuji's home market web site, and noticed that every lens in every series is now tagged in red as discontinued:

本製品は、生産終了いたしました。

The home page for the LF lenses is here:

http://fujifilm.jp/personal/filmandcamera/lens/largeformat/index.html

Cletus
6-Jun-2013, 04:15
A sad day indeed! I do believe there's been something somewhere pointing to this news, but I can't think of a more reliable source than the OEM. Anyway. Too bad, Fujinons have always been my favorite lenses; fortunately they're still plentiful (for now) on the used market.

tenderobject
6-Jun-2013, 10:44
ouch. i should buy whatever fujinon i could afford. if ever i have extra funds.

David Karp
6-Jun-2013, 11:15
Wow, end of an era. Good thing I have all the Fujinons I could ever need! Wait, there is that . . . .

Drew Wiley
6-Jun-2013, 11:24
If this is true it doesn't take much to figure it out. Blame the confluence of a glut of used LF lenses on the auction site, the steep exchange rate lately, and the
dramatically rising cost of energy in Japan due to their recent disasters. But my very favorite Fujinon lenses were discontinued a long time ago anyway.

Brian C. Miller
6-Jun-2013, 11:33
When was the last time any of you bought a new lens? Yes, brand new! I think the last lens I bought brand new was at least four years ago. I haven't seen a new Fuji for sale since Nikon dropped its LF lenses.

Drew Wiley
6-Jun-2013, 11:49
Badger and Midwest have still been selling certain items new. I can think of several of the lenses which hold their value so well that they new wouldn't be much more
than typical used prices, which are only going to slowly go up in price as "cult" lenses. There's no direct substitute for the 450C, for example. The Nikon 450M is a tank by comparison. The A's will rebound in price, esp the 240's. The 300 and 360 A's have long been cult lenses.... and then there were the 600 and 1200 A's, which are about as common as two-headed ivory-billed woodpeckers. The ordinary plastmats are abundant and at very low prices right now, and are damn good
lenses for general use.

Sal Santamaura
6-Jun-2013, 12:29
When was the last time any of you bought a new lens? Yes, brand new!...I haven't seen a new Fuji for sale since Nikon dropped its LF lenses.Four months ago. I bought a brand new 180A from Badger. It had probably been a long time since Jeff sold one because, after I placed the order ("special order"), he immediately changed his Fujinon page prices, raising them by about $150. It took around 6 weeks to receive the lens, but Jeff honored the lower price I'd placed that Web order at.


...There's no direct substitute for the 450C, for example...The A's will rebound in price, esp the 240's. The 300 and 360 A's have long been cult lenses...I added the 180A to my other As, namely a 240, 300 and 360. They go along with a 450C and 600C. All obtained new, if available, or from meticulous sellers like Kerry for the then-discontinued As.

As a side note, the only Fujinon I ever found to be a dud was the 300C. Also purchased new, it had the lowest contrast of any LF lens from any manufacturer I've every used, and there have been many. That's when I got the 300A to replace it.

David Lindquist
6-Jun-2013, 12:39
Arguably the Fujinon line included lenses that were unique and perhaps are not so numerous used, again the 450 C comes to mind (and this was the last lens I bought new back in 2007). Even for these there may not be enough demand to support their continued manufacture. I also wonder if possibly this was precipitated by the the supply of new Copal shutters running out?
David

E. von Hoegh
6-Jun-2013, 12:41
When was the last time any of you bought a new lens? Yes, brand new! I think the last lens I bought brand new was at least four years ago. I haven't seen a new Fuji for sale since Nikon dropped its LF lenses.

I've purchased exactly one "new" (it was a demo but came with the original warranty) lens, in 1988.

Kodachrome25
6-Jun-2013, 12:42
When was the last time any of you bought a new lens? Yes, brand new!

I bought a impossible to find used Schneider 350mm F/11 Apo-Tele-Xenar Compact from B&H last fall. But to be fair, my other 6 lenses were bought used, including the awesome 240mm F9 Fujinon A.

Drew Wiley
6-Jun-2013, 12:47
Hmmm... that puzzles me, Sal. The only C I don't have is the 300, but it seems to have an excellent reputation. Could it be an older non-MC version? I have a 300
Nikkor M for 4x5 use, but always gravitate toward a 360A for my 8x10 work. But the contrast level is so high on my Fujinons and Nikkors that I sometimes preferred G-Clarons for chromes. Now that I primarily shoot color neg, it's the other way around. I use the 180A less frequently, except for 6x9 work where it fits into my
personal definition of a "normal" angle of view - and it's plennnnty sharp for the increased enlargement.

Mark Sampson
6-Jun-2013, 14:40
The only LF lens I ever purchased new was a 210/5.6 Fujinon-L. It cost $249.00 in 1982. Seeing that they seldom tried to market those lenses in the USA, even when the LF business was thriving, it's no surprise that they didn't sell enough of them to keep the business going. Still, a sad day for LF photographers.

David Lindquist
6-Jun-2013, 14:50
Just looked at Badger's website. For the 450mm f/12.5 Fujinon they have the comment: LAST ONE AVAILABLE FROM FUJINON. NO LONGER MADE. Midwest has a note to call or e mail for stock information for this lens.
David

Jody_S
6-Jun-2013, 15:24
When was the last time any of you bought a new lens?

For LF? Never. But I always encouraged other people to buy new, if they could afford it, unlike the bunch here who usually dump on people asking about new lenses, telling them they can get the lens for 1/3 the price on fleabay. Because if no one buys new lenses, people will stop making them.

Finances permitting, I'm in the market for something longer than 300mm for 8x10, I really wish I could afford one of the last 'new' Fujinons in stock somewhere.

dave_whatever
6-Jun-2013, 16:04
Glad I bought a 300/8.5 C not so long ago, great lens.

Sal Santamaura
6-Jun-2013, 17:01
Hmmm... that puzzles me, Sal. The only C I don't have is the 300, but it seems to have an excellent reputation. Could it be an older non-MC version?...Nope, it was a brand spanking new EBC multicoated version, bought around 15 years ago, mostly on the strength of that reputation.


...I use the 180A less frequently, except for 6x9 work where it fits into my personal definition of a "normal" angle of view...Three years ago, I had S.K. Grimes machine a replacement for the SV57 baseplate that includes an Arca-style dovetail. It mounts using the same holes that Ebony made for the stock titanium baseplate. Hiromi even sent me appropriately longer versions of his custom stainless steel screws to attach it with. :)

9654796548

As a result, a "well" in the wood base is no longer obstructed by one of the two tripod sockets protruding upward. The 180A's front element is shallow enough to fit in that well, even with a UV filter attached. Although its image circle is rated at 252mm, there's no mechanical vignetting until much further out. Thus, I have a rapidly set up 5x7 system that's perfect for contact prints with extreme movements and more than sharp enough for enlargements using more reasonable movements. The f/9 aperture hasn't presented any focusing/composing problems, likely because I replaced Ebony's ground glass with a Maxwell Hi-Lux 4.7 screen combined with a Beattie AR-coated cover glass. In many situations, attaching the BTZS focus hood isn't even necessary. :D

lbenac
6-Jun-2013, 17:21
[/QUOTE] As a result, a "well" in the wood base is no longer obstructed by one of the two tripod sockets protruding upward. The 180A's front element is shallow enough to fit in that well, even with a UV filter attached. :D[/QUOTE]

I am doing something similar if less sophisticated with my Wista 45DX and a Fujinon-W 125/5.6 + Xenar 210/6.1

9654996550

Oren Grad
6-Jun-2013, 17:31
These last two posts might be good "seeds" for a separate thread on useful camera base mods.

Wayne
6-Jun-2013, 20:10
I think people are only buying brassy fungus-crust lenses these days.

David Karp
6-Jun-2013, 22:23
Sal,

I think you will be very happy with that 180 A. I have one that came with a camera and a bunch of other items that I bought to get a Horseman 6x7 holder. I ended up selling off almost everything over time, including the 6x7 holder, but I kept the 180 A. It pairs nicely for 4x5 with my 450 C, 125 f/5.6 NW and single coated 240 A.

Renato Tonelli
7-Jun-2013, 06:31
Leads me to wonder when the other two shoes (Schneider and Rodensotck) will drop.
I am very happy with my Fujinons. I wish I had known about them much earlier - I would have saved quite a bit of money.

Kevin Crisp
7-Jun-2013, 06:34
If B&L ever stops making the Protar VII series I'm going to be really bummed.

Actually the last new lens I purchased was the 450c and it is terrific.

BrianShaw
7-Jun-2013, 07:13
Because if no one buys new lenses, people will stop making them.

That kind of basic business decision appears to have happened in reality. It is too bad, really, but how can we be too surprised?

David Lindquist
7-Jun-2013, 08:37
Leads me to wonder when the other two shoes (Schneider and Rodensotck) will drop.
I am very happy with my Fujinons. I wish I had known about them much earlier - I would have saved quite a bit of money.

On this forum earlier this year Bob Salomon reported that the 35, 45, and 55 mm Apo Grandagons have been discontinued. On their website Linhof & Studio notes "To be discontinued" for the following Rodenstock lenses: the Apo Sironar S focal lengths of 100, 180, 240, 300 and 360 mm and the Grandagon N in focal lengths 65, 75 and 90 mm (both f/4.5 and f/6.8). Couldn't immediately see anything on Rodenstock's website to this effect. Again I wonder if these decisions are being driven to some extent by a dwindling supply of Copal shutters.
David

desertrat
7-Jun-2013, 09:28
I think the manufacture of new lenses will dwindle until some equilibrium is reached where one remaining manufacturer can continue to make a few for a profit. When that point is reached, they will be pretty expensive, but there are a few people who will pay a premium price for a brand new product.

Cooke in the UK runs off a small batch of LF lenses now and then, or did until a couple of years ago. That may be the future norm for new production.

It's also possible new manufacture may cease for several years, until the price of desirable used lenses climbs high enough to make it economically feasible for some company to start making (a few) new ones. We may see Chinese made LF lenses entering the market at some point in the future.

Bob Salomon
7-Jun-2013, 09:33
On this forum earlier this year Bob Salomon reported that the 35, 45, and 55 mm Apo Grandagons have been discontinued. On their website Linhof & Studio notes "To be discontinued" for the following Rodenstock lenses: the Apo Sironar S focal lengths of 100, 180, 240, 300 and 360 mm and the Grandagon N in focal lengths 65, 75 and 90 mm (both f/4.5 and f/6.8). Couldn't immediately see anything on Rodenstock's website to this effect. Again I wonder if these decisions are being driven to some extent by a dwindling supply of Copal shutters.
David

All Apo Sironar N lenses were discontinued quite a while ago, we have one demo 240 left cheap. All Apo Grandagons lenses were discontinued a few months ago. No Apo Sironar S lenses are discontinued. The Grandagons 65mm 4.5, 75 mm 4.5, and both 90mm lenses are current.

Rodenstock has stated that they were able to order enough Copal shutters to cover their needs for the immediate future. Of course that means that they have enough also for all their digital lenses from 23 to 180mm as well as for their 120 and 180mm macro lenses.

The latest Linhof factory price lists have indicated that many lenses from Rodenstock and Schneider may have limited availability. These lenses are marked with an * in the price list.

ROL
7-Jun-2013, 09:55
I knew this forum would eventually cost me more than my dignity or any remaining faith in humanity. I just pulled the trigger from BG on:

"Fujinon Compact 450mm/12.5
LAST ONE AVAILABLE FROM FUJINON. NO LONGER MADE."

:eek: (Yikes!)

Andrew O'Neill
7-Jun-2013, 10:01
When was the last time any of you bought a new lens? Yes, brand new! I think the last lens I bought brand new was at least four years ago. I haven't seen a new Fuji for sale since Nikon dropped its LF lenses.

2002 in Japan. The last new lens I bought was a Fuji 600C. Which my insurance company replaced new in 2006 along with other Fujinon lenses, after they were stolen.

Arne Croell
7-Jun-2013, 12:03
Schneider also cut their lens lines significantly, no longer produced (although available as long as they have stock) are the XXL Fine-Art series, all the Macro-Symmars, all the Apo-Tele-Xenars, the Super-Angulon XL 38mm and 47mm, and the Apo-Symmar L 480mm, as mentioned in this older thread: http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?100681-Schneider-reduces-available-LF-lenses

The last lens I bought new was the Apo-Tele-Xenar 350mm from Schneider 4 years ago, and now its out of production already.

David Lindquist
7-Jun-2013, 16:59
Schneider also cut their lens lines significantly, no longer produced (although available as long as they have stock) are the XXL Fine-Art series, all the Macro-Symmars, all the Apo-Tele-Xenars, the Super-Angulon XL 38mm and 47mm, and the Apo-Symmar L 480mm, as mentioned in this older thread: http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?100681-Schneider-reduces-available-LF-lenses

The last lens I bought new was the Apo-Tele-Xenar 350mm from Schneider 4 years ago, and now its out of production already.

Thank you for this Arne. I remembered your posting this originally but had not gotten to finding it so that I could cite it. The U.S. Schneider website still gives no indication that these lenses have been discontinued.

Also see what alan-salsman posted on March 25, 2013 in this thread: http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?101529-Copal-shutting-the-doors/page3&highlight=Schneider+repair+L.A: "I was just on the phone with Schneider USA West Coast ,talking about a shutter repair they had completed And I asked them about copal shutters.Last year Schneider was told to prepare an order for the last run of copal shutters before the company closed its doors.Than I asked where Schneider was going to get shutters from and was told that Schneider is no longer making large format lenses except for digital which use electronic shutters .All very sad mews but since it came from the horses mouth or facilely there of I thought I would pass it on."

David

Professional
8-Jun-2013, 21:29
I didn't buy any of Fujinon lenses yet and i know there are still some available, but i feel very sorry that Fuji made me to go with film and now they try to end their film industry, my best films are: Acros, Velvia 50 and Reala for B&W amd color neg/slide, so i feel sad why this happen when i just got into film recently years, good i bouught enough films to use within years but i will miss Fuji products.

I am more interested in Schneider and Rodenstock lenses over Fujinon/Nikkor ones, i know they all are great brands, but i have 2 lenses only from the first 2 names and i am so happy, will buy 2 or 3 more then i am done.

neil poulsen
9-Jun-2013, 05:30
I don't know if this counts, but I purchased a new 150mm Calumet SE Enlarging lens (same as Componon S single-coated) maybe 20 years ago. I bought a 180mm Caltar (Sironar, before N and S versions I think) and ended up returning it to get a 7" Dagor. I think that was about 25 years ago.

I just purchased a Fujinon 600mm C f11.5 for a four-figure price that was $1 over a 3 figure price. Since it's in Exc++ condition, I thought that I got a pretty good deal.

Drew Wiley
10-Jun-2013, 09:00
There are people on this forum using lenses almost a hundred years old. And since so many modern lenses are still in circulation in good condition, or hardly used at
all, I don't think large format photography has anything to worry about for many decades. Yeah, there will always be certain specific items which command a high
price, what we call cult lenses, but that has always been the case. There will be plenty of lenses to cannibalize shutters from too, at least for many items. Fuji is still heavily engaged in high-end lens mfg, but in areas much more active and profitable than LF. Likewise Nikon. But someone could revive mfg of select items if there
ever was sufficient demand. But we're all to blame... who can pass up a bargain?

BrianShaw
10-Jun-2013, 09:59
... But someone could revive mfg of select items if there
ever was sufficient demand. ...

Didn't Cooke already do that; they have pre-emptively proven you correct!

Bob Salomon
10-Jun-2013, 10:56
"But someone could revive mfg of select items if there
ever was sufficient demand."

Not that simple.
First someone has to pay for the raw glass. Then someone has to melt the glass and wait for it to properly cool. Then someone has has to cut the blanks, grind them, polish them, make the mounts, position and center the blanks (maybe cement them to make groups, coat them, then mount in a shutter, but Copal has stopped all production of mechanical shutters.

If there isn't a large market for new lenses it is cost prohibitive to make very small production runs. Who will pay for them?

On top of everything else, making lenses from scratch is very time consuming. It takes a long time to prepare, melt, cool, grind and coat those blanks.

BrianShaw
10-Jun-2013, 11:13
"But someone could revive mfg of select items if there
ever was sufficient demand."

Not that simple.

Amen to that, but someone might have the initiative and funding and a marketting plan to pull it off. I find it interesting, in many domain areas, how creative some folks can be in making what seems impossible actually happen.

Drew Wiley
10-Jun-2013, 11:30
Obviously it would be on a limited selection basis, Bob. But far more expensive lenses just as complicated to make are, and still will be, manufactured for other
applications, including cine, video, machine optics, digital etc etc. The equipment and know-how aren't going to disappear. What is gone is the financial incentive.
Same with mechanical cameras from Nikon, Leica, etc - you make something that will last for generations and you don't get lots of repeat sales. Not far from here there
is a fire station which has had the same light bulb burning on the porch for over a hundred years! The company which dedicated that kind of glass and filament to it
sure made some happy customers, but soon went out of business because nobody needed a new bulb. But that doesn't preclude hope. Look at the superb aftermarket Zeiss-labeled lenses Cosina is making for Nikon cameras once Nikon pulled the plug on their own traditional line of manual-focus lenses. View lenses
wouldn't be any more complicated to revive. Of course, I know someone who will make any kind of lens you could ask for, and will make it even better, but for
the cost of a Ferrari.

Bob Salomon
10-Jun-2013, 11:42
Obviously it would be on a limited selection basis, Bob. But far more expensive lenses just as complicated to make are, and still will be, manufactured for other
applications, including cine, video, machine optics, digital etc etc. The equipment and know-how aren't going to disappear. What is gone is the financial incentive.
Same with mechanical cameras from Nikon, Leica, etc - you make something that will last for generations and you don't get lots of repeat sales. Not far from here there
is a fire station which has had the same light bulb burning on the porch for over a hundred years! The company which dedicated that kind of glass and filament to it
sure made some happy customers, but soon went out of business because nobody needed a new bulb. But that doesn't preclude hope. Look at the superb aftermarket Zeiss-labeled lenses Cosina is making for Nikon cameras once Nikon pulled the plug on their own traditional line of manual-focus lenses. View lenses
wouldn't be any more complicated to revive. Of course, I know someone who will make any kind of lens you could ask for, and will make it even better, but for
the cost of a Ferrari.

Drew,

You must be forgetting that we are the Linhof and the Wista distributor. We know hand made. And we sure know what it is like selling new Master Technikas against all those old Linhof Technikas. Leica and Nikon never had a film camera that is still current with the production history of the Technika!

Just the current model, the Master Technika, has been available since 1972 and is still in current production! And it is the direct decendent of the III introduced in 1946. And the III grew out of the Medezin and the II from the 1930s!

Many of Edison's original light bulbs could burn that long. But then he GE was born!

E. von Hoegh
10-Jun-2013, 12:05
Drew,

You must be forgetting that we are the Linhof and the Wista distributor. We know hand made. And we sure know what it is like selling new Master Technikas against all those old Linhof Technikas. Leica and Nikon never had a film camera that is still current with the production history of the Technika!

Just the current model, the Master Technika, has been available since 1972 and is still in current production! And it is the direct decendent of the III introduced in 1946. And the III grew out of the Medezin and the II from the 1930s!

Many of Edison's original light bulbs could burn that long. But then he GE was born!

True. But they shed a gloom, you need two - one to see the other by. Plus they have a color temperature of about 1800k. Carbon filament bulbs are also about half as efficient as tungsten. You can still buy them, made in China of course; they'll last so long you'll wish you never saw one! :) My point is that the early Linhofs were far better cameras than Edison's early lighbulbs were lightbulbs. (I collect carbon filament lighbulbs, I have several Edisons. All my bulbs still work.)

David Karp
10-Jun-2013, 14:20
Technically it would be possible to revive these lenses. Practically may be another story.

I think Fuji revived at least the A series at some point. I recall that they were announced as discontinued, and Badger and MPEX ran out. Then they miraculously returned. (Does that ring a bell? Am I right about this?) This could be possible again, if people were willing to pay the price and Fuji was still making lenses.

Seems like the real problem is the shutters. Copal would have to agree to make more, which might be possible if enough were made, and they still had the tooling.

So it could happen, but it sounds like a longshot, and a very expensive proposition.

Jac@stafford.net
16-May-2014, 12:31
Thanks to the Goddess of the Adequate I have all the lenses I will ever need, and more, the foolish excess of which will be dumped cheap, as if a fire sale on that auction site.

richardman
16-May-2014, 13:07
Why not fire sale here :-)?

Drew Wiley
16-May-2014, 13:26
I suspect the crown jewels of the Fuji A line were discontinued way back due to special glass types which became unavailable for either enviro or expense reasons.
The glass color in my 360 A as well as the multicoating is a bit different than my 180 and 240 A's, which were the two focal lengths kept alive and are still commonly
available. I've never even seen the 600 and 1200 A's, but those were only made in extremely limited numbers back in single-coating days. The 300A is very similar
to the 360A. All of them are highly desirable.

Drew Wiley
16-May-2014, 13:41
Bob - yeah, I know what kind of business you are in. And I sure as heck know the difference between machined diecast equip and Chinese pot metal. I'm in the same game with construction and woodworking equip, and mostly sell German mfg gear, often thousands of dollars worth between these very posts - which might explain
why some of my posts are so convoluted, as I try to clear my head between bursts of activity. But we'll never again see the likes things like Durst pro enlargers. Too expensive. Everything is now CNC and hard-surface anodized. But that kind of gear is made to last, so can be refurbished. Allegedly the longest-burning lightbulb in the world in on a little rural firehouse across the bay here in Marin County. It has continuously burned for over a hundred years now (it is kept on continuously). No big secret. Just a nice thick piece of glass and a real heavy filament. Of course, the company that made it didn't sell any replacements bulbs, so promptly went of business. Now almost everything seems engineered to fail prematurely. That's why even the pliers we sell here are imported from Germany. But my own brother used a Super Technika, and it was indeed a handsome piece of gear.

Sal Santamaura
16-May-2014, 15:05
Bob - yeah, I know what kind of business you are in...I try to clear my head...I've never understood why people complain about adding posts to older threads and certainly don't object in this case. Nonetheless, I just wondered whether your realize you're responding to Bob 11 months and 6 days after he made that post. :D:D:D

Drew Wiley
16-May-2014, 15:32
Of course not, Sal. I just saw the today's post dates. But senility is a blessing at this point in the week. One more hour and I start fooling hands-on with LF again.
Fabulous weather and shifting color here now, and I'm packing for a brief excursion to the high country soon too, plus two rather intense technical film projects in
the lab this weekend, in between shifts of house painting... And want to develop some 8x10's from my non-Fuji lenses, though I am coveting an older 420 L in a
Copal 3s - something not as clinically sharp as my A and C lenses, but not a softie either, and a tessar, not a dagor. You have any experience with these?

Sal Santamaura
16-May-2014, 15:50
...I am coveting an older 420 L in a Copal 3s - something not as clinically sharp as my A and C lenses, but not a softie either, and a tessar, not a dagor. You have any experience with these?Yes, I own one, as well as Fuji 300 and 360 As along with 450 and 600 Cs. At the apertures I typically shoot 8x10 (f/32 - f/45) there's no substantial difference in sharpness between any of them. The 420L is in an older Copal, the one with a non-linear aperture scale and many aperture blades. It makes a nice round hole, useful for portraits. The biggest impression a 420L will make is when you pick it up -- that's one heavy package of glass!

ROL
16-May-2014, 16:00
I've never understood why people complain about adding posts to older threads and certainly don't object in this case. Nonetheless, I just wondered whether your realize you're responding to Bob 11 months and 6 days after he made that post. :D:D:D

Let me get this straight, Sal – you're actually wondering why Mr. Wiley posts here, at all, for any reason? :eek:

Drew Wiley
16-May-2014, 16:13
Thanks, Sal. I knew the L was heavy, but it's precisely that older round shutter I'm after, with the still relatively modern tessar optics. I want a different out of focus
background effect than with my dagors or plastmats (including my own Fuji A's, which are of course far lighter wt.) And the Nikkor M might not have the ideal shutter
for me either, even though its an outstanding sharp tessar. Right now I'm using a Carl Meyer process tessar at long exposure with just the lens cap. The look on 8x10 is wonderful, but it would probably cost as much to fit it into a used 3S as to just outright buy a Fuji L, which seems reasonably common. But I've got to start ignoring Mr. Range of Light. He suffers from the same kind of dementia that I do. As a friend once stated, after you've been in the high country long enough,
you cease to be human and become a marmot. Maybe some marmots scamper around a little faster than others. I'll concede that one to him. But otherwise, at the
end of day, we would all prefer to be lounging on a granite boulder somewhere than in front of a monitor.

Sal Santamaura
16-May-2014, 16:14
I've never understood why people complain about adding posts to older threads and certainly don't object in this case. Nonetheless, I just wondered whether your realize you're responding to Bob 11 months and 6 days after he made that post. :D:D:D


Let me get this straight, Sal you're actually wondering why Mr. Wiley posts here, at all, for any reason? :eek:No, as quoted, I wondered whether he realized that the post Bob made was almost one year old. That's all. No curiosity whatsoever about his motivation.

Sal Santamaura
11-Oct-2014, 09:19
...I went looking for the first time in a while at the web pages for the large format Fujinons on Fuji's home market web site, and noticed that every lens in every series is now tagged in red as discontinued...


Badger and Midwest have still been selling certain items new...


Leads me to wonder when the other two shoes (Schneider and Rodensotck) will drop...Well over a year since Oren's original post, I just noticed that Badger's lens page


http://www.badgergraphic.com/opencart/index.php?route=product/category&path=3

has been updated to remove Fujinons completely. As best I can recall, it was within the last week or two when that page still included around a half dozen Fujinon lenses available as new special orders. No more.

Note that the Schneider shoe has also dropped. B&H's page


http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?ipp=100&atclk=Lens+Type_Traditional+Photo+Lens&ci=40&N=4288584245+4291231926+4289367618

still lists 15 Schneider "Traditional Photo Lenses" in the "Large Format Lenses" category, but only three of them (180mm Apo Symmar L, 58mm Super Angulon XL and 80mm Super Symmar XL) appear to actually be in stock at the distributor and orderable.