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View Full Version : Beginning X-Ray film, a few questions



Shootar401
31-Mar-2013, 11:48
Since x-ray film is not available in 4x5, looks like I'm stuck cutting down 8x10 film. Luckily I have a rotary trimmer and night vision goggles to make it easy. My question is what film is the best to start with? Green, blue, other? Should I worry too much about stripping? Are there starting points available for developing in either HC110 or D76?

I can get 100 sheets of 8x10 film for $32, that 400 sheets of 4x5 @ 8 cents a sheet!

Jim Fitzgerald
31-Mar-2013, 12:28
You can cut the film in red safe light. No need for goggles. Just have a clean workspace and try not to slide the film. Develop in D-76 for 6-7 minutes. Stripping? I don't do it. I am a carbon printer and the density is just fine for me. Maybe a sliver printer can speak to the stripping issue. I see no sense in it. Blue or green it does not matter. I prefer the blue right now but have all kinds of green as well. Have fun.

Randy Moe
31-Mar-2013, 12:55
Great thread starter, I need info myself.

OP where are you buying the film?



Since x-ray film is not available in 4x5, looks like I'm stuck cutting down 8x10 film. Luckily I have a rotary trimmer and night vision goggles to make it easy. My question is what film is the best to start with? Green, blue, other? Should I worry too much about stripping? Are there starting points available for developing in either HC110 or D76?

I can get 100 sheets of 8x10 film for $32, that 400 sheets of 4x5 @ 8 cents a sheet!

Shootar401
31-Mar-2013, 14:10
"CXS online" They have Fuji & Kodak, about $30-$35 for a box of 100 sheets of 8x10. I mean for that price I might just speed up the production of my 8x10 pinhole.

Randy Moe
31-Mar-2013, 14:15
Ok, found http://www.cxsonline.com/

which film?

Green ortho?



"CXS online" They have Fuji & Kodak, about $30-$35 for a box of 100 sheets of 8x10. I mean for that price I might just speed up the production of my 8x10 pinhole.

Jim Fitzgerald
31-Mar-2013, 14:20
Go into the x-ray section. I use the Agfa half speed blue, green and full speed. I have bought film from e-bay as well with no problems. I just posted an image in the x-ray thread of a flower shot on half speed blue from 2004. What is not to like! I shoot it in 8x10, 11x14 and 14x17. There are many threads about using this film. Read them and you will have the info you need.

Randy Moe
31-Mar-2013, 14:30
Thanks Jim.

I saw your flower, big 50 page thread.

also finding lots of dead links, my favorite...

I will be buying some x-ray shortly, I love the sizes available, 7x17 i can cut to 7x11 and have 5x7 also, or as it's so cheap, just cut 11x14 in half

Your carbon prints are very nice, I might live long enough to try that out. :)

I do wonder if x-ray film is a permanent technology or is digital making inroads?



Go into the x-ray section. I use the Agfa half speed blue, green and full speed. I have bought film from e-bay as well with no problems. I just posted an image in the x-ray thread of a flower shot on half speed blue from 2004. What is not to like! I shoot it in 8x10, 11x14 and 14x17. There are many threads about using this film. Read them and you will have the info you need.

Jim Fitzgerald
31-Mar-2013, 15:11
Digital here but the third world is still using old film x-ray machines for a long time. Thanks, the shot is nice that I posted but the actual carbon print is even better. Not bad for 9 year old x-ray film. Read on and research.

Randy Moe
31-Mar-2013, 15:22
Yes, Jim, I am finding your first explorations from 2009.

This is what many of us should start with. it's affordable and makes ULF a possibility. i figured i would shoot maybe 10 images in a summer with my 7x11, this x-ray film changes all that. now i need more holders...


Digital here but the third world is still using old film x-ray machines for a long time. Thanks, the shot is nice that I posted but the actual carbon print is even better. Not bad for 9 year old x-ray film. Read on and research.

Jim Fitzgerald
31-Mar-2013, 16:04
Holders, yep. I wish I had more than 4 14x17 holders

Corran
31-Mar-2013, 16:41
I personally recommend stripping if you are scanning or printing with traditional silver paper.

Randy Moe
31-Mar-2013, 16:51
I have one, 7x11 holder. but it is 'mint' maybe unused. I will need to change film in the field. Not pleasant I am sure. There is one 7X11 holder for sale on the bay, but it has the wrong 'T' distance. Not sure why somebody would make new holders to a different dimension than the old Kodak 'standard'. I know, there is no standard, but Eastman 7x11's are the only old ones I know of.

My 11x14 contraption is a Levy copy camera conversion, I have two single sided, 'tape the film on' giant heavy holders. It's not leaving the house on my back... It needs 4 feet more bellows, which may soon be a big long box of foam core...I bet I can scare a sitter with that rig!

X-RAY Photography on my 'ART' cards.



Holders, yep. I wish I had more than 4 14x17 holders

tenderobject
31-Mar-2013, 17:54
Hi Corran, What do you mean exactly by stripping for traditional silver print? I might try xray film for my 8x10 soon! I can't wait. I do contact print with traditional black and white and will probably do alt prints from xray films.


I personally recommend stripping if you are scanning or printing with traditional silver paper.

Corran
31-Mar-2013, 19:05
I mean with standard fiber/RC paper, contact printing, stripping works very nicely. Scanning is also better when stripped, in my opinion. If you are doing alt. process work, don't strip (according to the experts on that topic, which I'm inclined to believe - I tried some Kallitypes with my stripped negatives and they never really turned out well).

On the other hand folks - just shoot two dang negatives and try it! Give the one you are stripping a little more exposure. It's not like the film is expensive enough not to want to try it!!

Randy Moe
31-Mar-2013, 19:09
although, I have never even seen x-ray film, I think, it means to strip the back side emulsion, after fixing, and involves bleaching just the backside. I have no idea how to do that.

tenderobject
1-Apr-2013, 02:38
thanks corran! :)


I mean with standard fiber/RC paper, contact printing, stripping works very nicely. Scanning is also better when stripped, in my opinion. If you are doing alt. process work, don't strip (according to the experts on that topic, which I'm inclined to believe - I tried some Kallitypes with my stripped negatives and they never really turned out well).

On the other hand folks - just shoot two dang negatives and try it! Give the one you are stripping a little more exposure. It's not like the film is expensive enough not to want to try it!!

SergeiR
1-Apr-2013, 08:30
although, I have never even seen x-ray film, I think, it means to strip the back side emulsion, after fixing, and involves bleaching just the backside. I have no idea how to do that.

Basically - you strip out side that you hate the most or one that you manage to "intentionally" scratch (*cough cough*).
Process itself is simple, all you need is decent glass / plexy surface, you tape it with painters tape or something by edges, then just use clorox or any other scary products. Using brush, using paper towel bit, whatever. Dry, then wash a bit, then might need a second go. Not a fun job, i will tell you. I gave up on doing it, but i keep bleacher and brushes for experiments with "darkroom dorking" anyway, b/c i sometime feel like doing weird things to negatives, without PS.

Peculiar side effect of xray scanning, btw, is that both sides of film in unstripped form are "matte" . Thus making it less prone to newtonian rings. Another weird thing i noticed - its super duper easy flat. I have to fight usual film sometime, while taping to ANR glass. With Xray - it just lays flat.

djdister
24-Jan-2014, 12:01
Although this thread has been dormant a while, I have a real "x-ray newbie" question (or two). I recently acquired a hundred sheet box of GE/Agfa Structurix D4 5x7 film. First I noticed that there is no notch code, and after research found that it has emulsions on both sides of the base (see attachment), but I'm not sure the film is completely symmetrical - the brochure says "To achieve a rugged surface, the top layer has received the matting agent." Which "top layer" - are there two top layers?

Anyway, should I assume that it doesn't matter how I load this in the film holders with the double emulsions?

Does anyone else have firsthand experience with this particular x-ray film? I haven't seen it referenced in any of the x-ray image threads, other than one mention and no actual shots. Any other newbie insights about handling this film would be appreciated.
Thanks!

109122

gliderbee
24-Jan-2014, 12:53
Do I understand it right that you first make a picture, develop the film, fix, dry, and then tape it with the image side on a piece of glass to remove the emulsion on the other side ?
"Clorox" apparently is a brand name of some household products. What product is meant here (if I understand all this correctly) ?

Thanks,
Stefan.


Basically - you strip out side that you hate the most or one that you manage to "intentionally" scratch (*cough cough*).
Process itself is simple, all you need is decent glass / plexy surface, you tape it with painters tape or something by edges, then just use clorox or any other scary products. Using brush, using paper towel bit, whatever. Dry, then wash a bit, then might need a second go. Not a fun job, i will tell you. I gave up on doing it, but i keep bleacher and brushes for experiments with "darkroom dorking" anyway, b/c i sometime feel like doing weird things to negatives, without PS.

Peculiar side effect of xray scanning, btw, is that both sides of film in unstripped form are "matte" . Thus making it less prone to newtonian rings. Another weird thing i noticed - its super duper easy flat. I have to fight usual film sometime, while taping to ANR glass. With Xray - it just lays flat.

dsphotog
24-Jan-2014, 17:52
Do I understand it right that you first make a picture, develop the film, fix, dry, and then tape it with the image side on a piece of glass to remove the emulsion on the other side ?
"Clorox" apparently is a brand name of some household products. What product is meant here (if I understand all this correctly) ?

Thanks,
Stefan.

Clorox is laundry chlorine bleach.