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ryanmills
21-Mar-2013, 21:22
So since my fingers are starting to look like I dumped acid on them i figure I better start wearing gloves before they fall off. Are there any types of latex gloves to avoid? Dealing with B/W mostly right now but plan to move to color in a few weeks. Seems the ilford rapid fixer is burning my skin a bit.

Light Guru
21-Mar-2013, 21:31
Some disposable gloves have a powder coating to help with sweat. Avoid those.

ryanmills
21-Mar-2013, 21:37
So any powderless latex glove is good?

Richard Wasserman
21-Mar-2013, 21:39
Nitrile gloves are more chemical resistant than latex, and non-allergenic. Get them powderless.

ryanmills
21-Mar-2013, 21:44
Never heard of Nitrile gloves before, is that something only a photography store might carry or something I might find at a hardware store? Are there ideal gloves?

Shootar401
21-Mar-2013, 21:48
Never heard of Nitrile gloves before, is that something only a photography store might carry or something I might find at a hardware store? Are there ideal gloves?

I've seen them in the paint department at home depot and lowes, I'm sure your local drug store will have them too. I never wear gloves when developing film, only when working on my car. Go figure

ryanmills
22-Mar-2013, 00:19
Well the first few weeks I was fine but damn fixer has really messed up my fingers around the nails. Today they swelled and started to slightly tear. Sounds worse than it is but prob not on the road to anything good. Now it feels like achol on a cut and its quite distracting. Kind of worried its going to really mess up my shuffle, gotten really use to the feel and knowing when something is wrong or sticking.

civich
22-Mar-2013, 04:43
Nitrile gloves are widely available. If you have problems with them tearing as you pull them on (as I do) you might try Raven brand gloves which can be found at Napa auto parts stores. They are a few mils thicker and very re-usable. No powder and, they're black! A slightly greater loss of sensitvity is a minor downside. -Chris

Winger
22-Mar-2013, 06:31
These are great gloves for chemical use. It's what we used at the forensics lab where I used to work and it's what I use in the darkroom and to clean various things around the house (we have 3 dogs and a 3 yo boy - lots of messy messes).
http://www.amazon.com/KIM55083-Powder-Free-Gloves-Non-Latex-Purple/dp/B001TQDTA2/ref=pd_bxgy_hi_img_y

bob carnie
22-Mar-2013, 06:57
91796

These are the gloves I use each and every time I put my hands in chemicals.. learned the hard way. If you are having any issues now please start using them.

regards
Bob

MrJim
22-Mar-2013, 07:00
I like the textured nitrile, I seem to get more tactile feeling from them. I get mine, like above, from a car parts store. A box of 100 is about $7. To avoid them ripping because they aren't powdered, blow them up like a balloon before putting them on.

Greg Davis
22-Mar-2013, 07:18
I get non powdered nitrile gloves from a cheap hardware store called Harbor Freight. They may have on near you. Make sure your hands are dry when trying to put them on or the moisture will make it very difficult.

Peter Gomena
22-Mar-2013, 08:16
Non-powdered nitrile gloves are available at Costco. They are thin enough to easily feel sheet film in solutions. I now use them whenever I develop film, whether sheet or on rolls in slightly drippy stainless-steel canisters.

Leigh
22-Mar-2013, 08:18
Here's a selection of gloves from McMaster-Carr, with descriptions:
http://www.mcmaster.com/#gloves/=lzn3ut

They say that the nitrile gloves have the best chemical resistance. I prefer nitrile for darkroom work.

I suggest ordering from them since they have good prices, no minimum, and only actual shipping.

- Leigh

Alan Butcher
22-Mar-2013, 08:51
I use nitrile gloves, usually get this at Sam's Club. Also a good source for gloves is http://www.gemplers.com/ they have gloves for all activities.

ataim
22-Mar-2013, 08:54
I get non powdered nitrile gloves from a cheap hardware store called Harbor Freight. They may have on near you. Make sure your hands are dry when trying to put them on or the moisture will make it very difficult.

Same here.

Peter Lewin
22-Mar-2013, 08:59
Yet another vote for inexpensive nitrile gloves, I get mine from Home Depot where they are sold for house painting. I use them all the time for tray developing (primarily PMK, but even when I use HC-110) and for selenium toning.

Jim Noel
22-Mar-2013, 09:00
So since my fingers are starting to look like I dumped acid on them i figure I better start wearing gloves before they fall off. Are there any types of latex gloves to avoid? Dealing with B/W mostly right now but plan to move to color in a few weeks. Seems the ilford rapid fixer is burning my skin a bit.
Nitrile gloves are the best answer. Available at Home Depot, drug stores and medical supply stores.
Jim

SergeiR
22-Mar-2013, 09:02
I tried non latex (white) and nitrile (blue) ones. Nitriles are WAY easier to put on and hug better. Unfortunately every now and then they disappear from shop, so i got to buy another box of regular non latexes.. I seem to find them in about any pharmacy corner shop here in Dallas.

ryanmills
22-Mar-2013, 09:30
Sounds like nitrile are the way to go. I check the only store near by and they really did not have much. They did have "clorox" branded blue powerless gloves that are vinyl not laytex. Grabbed some till I could make a run to a hardware store. Anyone tried these before?

Bob Farr
22-Mar-2013, 09:49
Hi,

You've gotten a lot of good suggestions and I'll add another. I get nitrile gloves from VWR, rated to resist aviation fuel and still thin enough for tray processing. Item number 40101-350, the last time I stocked up they were about $50 for a box of 100.

If I'm not tray processing then the nitrile exam glove from Costco seem to be fine.

As has already been stated, you should be wearing gloves when processing film and tongs when printing. My rule is to keep hands out of the chemistry. Especially with selenium!!

Best of luck,
Bob

Drew Wiley
22-Mar-2013, 09:57
I've got catalogs full of chem gloves of about every price and description imaginable. I sell a variety of gloves here too. But
for my own use I simply buy the same non-powdered nitrile gloves as my wife uses around the house, from Costco. You don't
want them miserably tight for darkroom use, but fitting just well enough to handle film by the fingertips. Powder is anathema. It will get onto everything. Plus the same gloves work for staining and finsihing in the shop, general chores, everything but heavy-duty use. For actual chem mixing etc I keep on hand heavy-duty nitrile or neoprene gloves with long
cuffs, but these don't allow the feel of film in trays - seem fine for paper however.