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Thread: 120/60 to 240/50 and all that.

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    303

    120/60 to 240/50 and all that.

    Help me Techies.

    From another thread (thank you Andrej) I understand that my Epson R2400 printer will work on 240/50 with a suitable step down transformer. However, what about my Epson V700 scanner? Moving back to NZ next year and would like to keep both these.

    Many thanks.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,116

    Re: 120/60 to 240/50 and all that.

    By the time the electricity gets into the scanner, it's been rectified and filtered; that is it is DC. Just get the proper power supply.
    One man's Mede is another man's Persian.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    303

    Re: 120/60 to 240/50 and all that.

    Great news E. Thank you.

  4. #4
    retrogrouchy
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Adelaide, Australia
    Posts
    832

    Re: 120/60 to 240/50 and all that.

    EPSON power supplies are of excellent quality but cheap third-party ones from china, not so much. Some are quite dangerous and even a crappy one will cost you $25 because of the crazy epson-proprietary plug, whereas you can buy a 100W or 200W stepdown for the same price and it will be much safer as long as you don't overload it. If you have a known-high-quality 12V (or whatever it is) supply and you're happy to splice the epson plug onto it then that is a good option, I would just not recommend buying an offbrand supply for this purpose.

    I run my V600 off a $25 stepdown and the original EPSON USA power supply. Same will work with the V700. I do the same thing with a kitchenaid, a/v receiver and Bowens monolight; each one has a 2kVA stepdown running it that cost me about $60 each. If you have a few 110V items in the one room, they can all run off one larger stepdown via a USA power board. Don't forget to turn it off at night though; the magnetisation current on the larger ones will waste a bit of power.

    Make sure the stepdown is rated for 2x the power you expect your load to pull, especially if you're connecting motors or a switching supply that lacks power-factor correction.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    303

    Re: 120/60 to 240/50 and all that.

    Polyglot,
    Glad to hear from someone who has done it. Many thanks.

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