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Thread: Protecting an archival pigmented ink print

  1. #21
    bob carnie's Avatar
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    Re: Protecting an archival pigmented ink print

    Peter is correct.. Our supplier has confirmed Claryl is out of business but they are moving to Art Glass and we are testing it out.

    this is from my supplier.. I do not endorse this product as we have just started using it.

    I understand you would like some additional information regarding our new product Art Glass.


    Bob
    Below you will find a link to the companies official website where you will find all details regarding their product.

    http://www.groglass.com/en/products/...ss-for-framing



    Art Glass is manufactured in Latvia at the following location

    SIA GroGlass
    Katlakalna iela 4B
    Riga, LV-1073
    Latvia



    Quote Originally Posted by Peter J. De Smidt View Post
    According to this distributor, Claryl has gone out of business: http://www.warehouseframingsupply.co.../claryl-glass/

  2. #22

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    Re: Protecting an archival pigmented ink print

    Here in HK we have terrible problems with humidity. Two seasons, hot'n'wet or cold'n'wet. It's sub-tropical. Canon papers seem to resist emulsion bloom better than Epson but I still don't trust it. If I'm printing then we'll hot-press to remove moisture then cold mount direct to plexiglass, this is a gorgeous way to display.

    In all cases we need to dry the print in using a hotpress vacuum press. In cases where glass might not be safe (in commercial work or for homes with kids) we recommend a gloss or matt laminate that is processed in the hotpress. This can be mounted to card and framed or gallery wrapped around MDF. The MDF can itself be framed or mounted raised inside a frame with no glass. The satin matt laminate is thick and really tough. The adhesive can be offered as regular adhesive or with an acid buffer.

    If you're printing to a Baryta fibre paper or rag then the paper has a lot of bearing on the final print, traditional framing methods apply.

    - Paul

  3. #23

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    Re: Protecting an archival pigmented ink print

    I'd love to hear more on this, specifically aimed at the smaller, home inkjet sized prints under 13x19 or 16x20... more manageable for most people but still large enough to impress the yokels.

  4. #24
    bob carnie's Avatar
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    Re: Protecting an archival pigmented ink print

    If you are face mounting ink matt papers to plexi , how are you getting rid of the isssue of stippling/hase in the shadow areas??
    Quote Originally Posted by wentbackward View Post
    Here in HK we have terrible problems with humidity. Two seasons, hot'n'wet or cold'n'wet. It's sub-tropical. Canon papers seem to resist emulsion bloom better than Epson but I still don't trust it. If I'm printing then we'll hot-press to remove moisture then cold mount direct to plexiglass, this is a gorgeous way to display.

    In all cases we need to dry the print in using a hotpress vacuum press. In cases where glass might not be safe (in commercial work or for homes with kids) we recommend a gloss or matt laminate that is processed in the hotpress. This can be mounted to card and framed or gallery wrapped around MDF. The MDF can itself be framed or mounted raised inside a frame with no glass. The satin matt laminate is thick and really tough. The adhesive can be offered as regular adhesive or with an acid buffer.

    If you're printing to a Baryta fibre paper or rag then the paper has a lot of bearing on the final print, traditional framing methods apply.

    - Paul

  5. #25
    bob carnie's Avatar
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    Re: Protecting an archival pigmented ink print

    We do not mark up the museum glass, we take the price of the regular glass and add the difference.. I wish I was getting 5x on framing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dakotah Jackson View Post
    The general recommendation for custom frame pricing is 5x the cost. Many use this with regular float glass. With the greater cost of museum glass many shops do not mark it up nearly as much. Even at a lower markup the amount made from a sale is greater than float glass marked up 5 times - the frame shop makes a decent profit and the client gets a better product.

    The shop that marked it up a full 5 times won't get your business again.

    A good quality mat cutter, learning to cut glass and do your own framing saves a bit of money and is a skill you will be glad you have through the years.

  6. #26
    bob carnie's Avatar
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    Re: Protecting an archival pigmented ink print

    You can build a relationship with a custom shop and order pre made, to your size.
    frame shot cuts all materials to size, joins the wood, and backing brace , you do all the assembly at home.
    I plan to move north within a couple of years , start a small gallery and printmaking shop and I will use my Toronto location to do just this.


    just don't expect to get one off service, look at your yearly needs, standardize your sizes and order in bulk, this will save you bundles and you
    get to the satisfaction of putting it all together.

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Petronio View Post
    I'd love to hear more on this, specifically aimed at the smaller, home inkjet sized prints under 13x19 or 16x20... more manageable for most people but still large enough to impress the yokels.

  7. #27

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    May 2012
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    NE US
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    Re: Protecting an archival pigmented ink print

    OP...Don't need spray coating if using for water repellant. Cured ink jet are very waterproof.

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