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Thread: Photographing woods

  1. #21
    Chuck P.'s Avatar
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    Re: Photographing woods

    Here's an example I have. The shadow on the dead tree was placed on Zone IV, the sunlit highights fell on Zone IX, I gave N-1 development to TMX with d-76 1:1. A 23A red-orange filter was used, the basic exposure was determined at 4 sec at f/64, accounting for the filter factor it was adjusted to 10 sec at f/64, finally accounting for reciprocity, the final exposure was 25 sec at f/64.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dead-tree,-forest001-5.jpg  

  2. #22

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    Re: Photographing woods

    Deer Hollow, winter in Vermont.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Deer Hollow.jpg  
    Michael W. Graves
    Michael's Pub

    If it ain't broke....don't fix it!

  3. #23

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    Re: Photographing woods

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Miller View Post
    The chaos of dense forests can be difficult to translate from 3D to 2D. I like to walk around with one eye closed so that IO start seeing in 2D.
    Greg makes a great point. I think the problem of photographing the forest is that it looks so cool in 3D. I am often disappointed by the 2D rendering. I now close one eye while hiking and it is surprising how many great 3D forest shots disapear as candidates for 2D. Now I try to find a subject in the forest instead of trying to make the forest the subject.

  4. #24
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    Re: Photographing woods

    I keep looking for single focal points in my woods, but often the texture is too thick for any one thing to declare itself.

    I said this in another thread as a joke, but I mean it seriously, too: I look at the work of Eliot Porter. In 1991 or 1992, he collaborated with James Gleick on a words-and-pictures book called "Nature's Chaos" which hits this topic head-on. Much of Porter's work is of woods and underbrush that makes the texture the subject rather than some singular thing. It's pattern-as-subject, even when the pattern is random. This is certainly not a new concept in art.

    When I was looking through the book, I was turning around the familiar phrase "can't see the forest for the trees" into: "Can't see the trees for the forest." I don't think I know what it means, though.

    Rick "whose property includes about 3500 pine trees" Denney

  5. #25
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    Re: Photographing woods





    Sometimes the woods are easier when you are inside looking out (first photo), or outside looking in (second photo).

    It can give a point of reference, implied or explicit.

  6. #26
    Land-Scapegrace Heroique's Avatar
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    Re: Photographing woods

    Quote Originally Posted by rdenney View Post
    “Can’t see the trees for the forest.” I don’t think I know what it means.
    Can’t see the smaller concrete realities – like a marble-sized quartz pebble whose white surface sparkles through a bit of green moss – due to the distractions of an abstract concept, like “forest” or “woods.”

  7. #27
    Land-Scapegrace Heroique's Avatar
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    Re: Photographing woods

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Lee View Post
    Sometimes the woods are easier when you are inside looking out, or outside looking in.
    Which image is the first kind, and is the other the second? ;^)

    It’s easy to get lost in the woods.

  8. #28
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    Re: Photographing woods

    Sorry that it was unclear.

    For the first image, the camera was inside the woods, looking out. There is a clearing in the distance, a snow-covered lake actually.

    For the second image, the camera was in a field, pointed towards the edge of the woods. Outside, looking in.

  9. #29

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    Re: Photographing woods

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Lee View Post
    Sorry that it was unclear.

    For the first image, the camera was inside the woods, looking out. There is a clearing in the distance, a snow-covered lake actually.

    For the second image, the camera was in a field, pointed towards the edge of the woods. Outside, looking in.
    I really like the first image looking out Ken. We have plenty of woods here in Michigan.

  10. #30

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    Re: Photographing woods

    Thank you all for your thoughts and examples!
    Website of sorts, as well as ipernity thing.

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