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Thread: Developing Kodak Plus-X in trays, suggestions please

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2001
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    13

    Developing Kodak Plus-X in trays, suggestions please

    I happened onto a couple of boxes of Plus-X, and will shortly be trying this film for some studio portraits. I would like advice from others who use (or have used) it.

    Yes, I have a copy of Kodak Publication F-5, "Kodak Professional Black-and-White Films". But the longest time it suggests for developing is 8-minutes, using Microdol-X. I would prefer a developer that requires 10 minutes or more at 70 degrees F.

    Any sugestions? What EI do you use? Of course I understand that your suggestions will only be starting points, etc. I'm just looking for those starting points.

    Thank you in advance, Erec Grim

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    Developing Kodak Plus-X in trays, suggestions please

    Hi Erec. There are a couple of ways to slow down the action of any developer. First, you could develop at a lower temperature, and second, you could dilute the developer being careful to use a minimum amount of stock solution to develop your film, and third, you could use the above in combination. Here's a link to a site with a lot of film and developer info:

    http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.html

    Since you're developing in trays, have you considered developing by inspection? Here's a link to chapter and verse on the subject:

    http://michaelandpaula.com/mp/startframe.html

    Look under "writings" for development by inspection.

    I find DBI especially effective for development of portraits. If your interested, email me off-list and I'll share my personal technique for portraits. It's really simple, and so far, fool-proof. Good luck.

  3. #3
    Whatever David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Developing Kodak Plus-X in trays, suggestions please

    There are advantages to keeping development times short, within reason, when using trays for film development. More time in the tray means more opportunity for scratching negatives during development, and more risk of fog if you have any small light leaks in your darkroom. 8 minutes doesn't strike me as unreasonable.

    That said, development times with PMK are on the long side, and I bet it would produce nice results with Plus-X. A google search should turn up some possible starting times, but I'd guess it would be on the order of 12-14 min.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Dec 1998
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    416

    Developing Kodak Plus-X in trays, suggestions please

    I develop Plus-X in trays using D-76 1:1. My normal time is 9 minutes at 70. N+1 is 13 minutes. N+2 is 16 minutes. I use a water stop.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    St. Paul, MN
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    Developing Kodak Plus-X in trays, suggestions please

    Hi Eric, I have been dabbling with Microdol-X at 1:1 dilution with Tri-X recently. In a very general sense, diluting Microdol-X 1:1 needs about 2 more minutes or about 20 percent more time, it seems. If Microdol-X is truely the same as Perceptol, Ilford gives times for 1:1 dilution. You can also go with 1:3, which requires probably 15-17 minutes at 68-70 degrees. I have used D-76 1:1 and straight in the past and have been pleased with the results as well. The developement by inspection mentioned above also sounds interesting. Good luck!

  6. #6

    Developing Kodak Plus-X in trays, suggestions please

    Microdol 1:3 is stunning and will really give you a long process...if that is really what your after, around 15-16 minutes. I also do agree with the Develop by inspection. It is relatively easy. There is a good article on it at www.unblinkingeye.com. I have done it alot with really great results with older emulsions. You could use a divided developer like Divided D76 for extremely fine grain or Diafine if you want a slight speed increase and sharper grain. I usually rate the older emulsions (using Diafine) at stated speed, i.e. 125 for PXP, because I like the slight added density because I use cold light for printing. Either way, the divided developers are know as compensating developers which means that they will develop the shadows to perfection and then only develop out the highlights so far also. What you end up with is a perfectly developed neg. Diafine will give very high acutance (sharp edge grain) to where it will look sharper. DD76 will give you extremely fine grain but with a softness when compared to Diafine. Divided D23 also is a nice developer and can also be found on unblinkingeye.com. I have the recipies... if your considering making it yourself...

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