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Thread: Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

  1. #1

    Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

    I'm looking for a copy of what looks to be a two sided Unicolor instruction pamphlet. I've a copy of the drum and I'd like to check the recommended volumes for this one.
    A PDF or JPG works fine if you have one.

    Help's appreciated, thanks

    Jan

  2. #2

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    Re: Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

    Jan,

    I have used the Unicolor film drums for many years and they are a great way to process B&W film. If you are processing 35mm use 5oz(150ml) for the first reel and 3oz(90ml) for each reel after that to a max of 6 reels. For 120 film on the 120/220 reels use 7oz(210ml) for the first reel and 5oz(150ml) for each reel after that to a max of 4 reels for 220 film use 10oz(300ml) for the first reel of 220 film and 8oz(240ml) for each reel after that to a max of 4 reels.

    These volumes are the minimum to cover the film, but you may want to use more depending on the dilution of the developer.

    At one time when I had a lot of 120 film to process I would put the first film in and at the end of the film I would crimp the corners of the film and run the next film in right after it. Most of the time this worked as long as you were careful in running the first roll all the way in.

    If you need extra 35mm reels, let me know and I could probably spare a few.

    Good luck,
    Robert

  3. #3

    Re: Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

    Robert I'll check those volumes out with a 'dry run' using water just to see the coverage. Was your tank the same as the one shown? If it is I'm thinking the information you've provided will be fine. I may have to adjust my dilutions due to me doing a lot of development with high ratios of developer to water and semi stand developing over protracted times.

    What did you find as a good time for some basic BW films like Tri X , Ilford HP5+ or Fuji Acros 100 ISO.

    Regarding extra reels I could probably use 2 -3 if the tank takes 6 spools because I have 3 with the one I got. That would let me deal with a major back log I have... don't ask.. but here's an indication from a year ago. I've more this time than shows in this one..


    Film wasters tour: ends Aug 28 / 10 by jannx, on Flickr

  4. #4

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    Re: Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

    They never changed the configuration of the drums. I have about three of the small drums like yours and two stretch drums that would handle 14 rolls!

    I used to process up to 20 rolls at a time with a regular drum and a stretch drum and two rollers and two Gralab timers. It was kind of a Chinese fire drill but it worked

    PM me if you would like some reels as I have quite a few and I use my Jobo CPA-2 most of the time now.

  5. #5

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    Re: Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

    I Have it posted on my website.
    http://www.willwilson.com/unicolorinstructions.html

  6. #6

    Re: Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

    Thanks Will. I took a screen capture of the instructions. It's appreciated!

    How do you like the CPA 2?

  7. #7

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    Re: Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

    Although it is possible to process color film with the film drum, the CPA-2 gives a control of the temperature and more precise agitation that is not available with the Unicolor film drum. I can process c-41 with no problem and get good consistent results every time. I also use an Expert Drum that will process up to 10 sheets flawlessly.

    If you get a Unicolor Print drum in 8x10, you can process up to 4 sheets at a time and many use this drum to good affect.

    I have started to process my B&W with the Jobo and like it very much, but for some quick and dirty processing of B&W, the Unicolor can't be beat. It takes a considerable amount of time to set up the Jobo. I can usually process a couple of rolls in the time it takes to set up the Jobo. I find the Unicolor reels easier to load than the Jobo reels.

    You asked about starting time for B&W processing and the best site on the web for that is the Massive Development Chart @ http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.php

    They also make an App that I use on my Ipod Touch that works very well.

  8. #8

    Re: Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

    Thanks Robert. I've developed BW for a long time. I'm aware of the MDC but the question from me was specifically regarding using a film processor. MDC provides information for non processing times using 'by hand methods'. From what I've read there is usually a shorter time for the developing of all films using a processor and I was trying to get a feel or exact times with a processor.

    The app on iPod is excellent.

    cheers Jan

  9. #9

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    Re: Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

    The times in the MDC can be lowered by 10-15% when you use rotary processing. Some feel that if you use a presoak, which I highly recommend with the Unidrum, then you needn't subtract time as the presoak will dilute the developer slightly. I am very conservative in reducing times so I usually only reduce a very little bit. You will have to run some tests with your technique and darkroom conditions.

  10. #10

    Re: Unicolor Instructions for : UNICOLOR 320 "Film Drum II" Film Processor

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Ley View Post
    The times in the MDC can be lowered by 10-15% when you use rotary processing. Some feel that if you use a presoak, which I highly recommend with the Unidrum, then you needn't subtract time as the presoak will dilute the developer slightly. I am very conservative in reducing times so I usually only reduce a very little bit. You will have to run some tests with your technique and darkroom conditions.
    Robert, thanks for the additional information. Can you clarify just a bit now? During development the usual drill is about 3.5 minutes (210 seconds) at 104f for C41.

    When you develop C41 personally do you reduce the developing time by 10% ie 21 seconds to a total of 189 seconds for developing? Or do you just follow the standard written drill of 210 seconds.
    Don't worry about my film. I intend to develop some throw away C41 first try but I'd like to get as close to optimal practice using the Unidrum base.

    Do you even bother with a change in time for BW at all or again just use the recommended times?
    With this information I'll start my first trial runs and then fine tune times along with developer ratios for the BW. Obviously the C41 won't need any adjustments for ratios.

    I appreciate the help and observations you've posted. Thanks Jan

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