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Thread: Double exposure

  1. #1

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    Double exposure

    We're all familiar with the double exposure technique where one image is super-imposed on another image. This involves taking photos of two different scenes.

    How about taking two shots of the same scene, but with different apertures? I came across this in "Primitive Photography" but had never heard about it before. It supposedly creates and "aura-like" effect. Does anyone else do this or something similar?

  2. #2

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    Re: Double exposure

    Interesting technique. Can't say that I've heard of that before but might give it a try. Good only on static subjects, thoguh. Sort of a "poor man's soft focus lens". The closest I've gotten to this technique are the times when I've acidentally kicked a tripod leg on timed exposures.

  3. #3

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    Re: Double exposure

    Are you talking about the Orton effect? That uses one image out of focus and one in focus to create the aura type effect I think you are talking about. It was very popular a few years back on some nature photography sites-you can easily Google it to see if that is what you are thinking of.

    Colleen

  4. #4
    retrogrouchy
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    Re: Double exposure

    You should have a look first at the 135 STF (see also) which uses an apodisation filter to give gaussian instead of disc (sharp-edged) bokeh.

    The Minolta 7 SLR has a "Pseudo-STF" mode which attempts to mimic this effect by taking multiple exposures across a wide range (about 7 stops I think) of apertures so that the core of the bokeh is brightest and the edges are dimmest - sort of a step-wise approximation to the gaussian shape of the STF's apodisation filter.

    So by taking multiple exposures with varying aperture (and not varying the focus!) you're doing a pseudo-STF effect. Your out of focus areas will have (e.g. with 2 exposures) two steps to the blur-edge; areas that are in-focus will remain in-focus with no visible difference.

    The Orton Effect is similar except that one exposure has lots of stuff out of focus, which gives a strong glowing effect even to areas that were in-focus on the first frame. Obviously you could do even funkier versions of this with a view camera than you can with 35mm and just bringing the focus in close.

  5. #5

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    Re: Double exposure

    I did a double exposure of water near a ferry dock that came out (I thought) quite spectacular, with a shimmering effect to the water that I really liked. I printed a 11x17 and entered it in a local (juried) photo contest and it was eliminated out of hand and not displayed. Some seem to view a double exposure as an inexcusable mistake, although I've never seen such a riveting effect.
    I've decided that I'm not ashamed of it...
    I think that double exposures are worth experimenting with, if you want a truly uncanny different look that forces people to look closely and think.

  6. #6
    indecent exposure cosmicexplosion's Avatar
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    Re: Double exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by jloen View Post
    I did a double exposure of water near a ferry dock that came out (I thought) quite spectacular, with a shimmering effect to the water that I really liked. I printed a 11x17 and entered it in a local (juried) photo contest and it was eliminated out of hand and not displayed. Some seem to view a double exposure as an inexcusable mistake, although I've never seen such a riveting effect.
    I've decided that I'm not ashamed of it...
    I think that double exposures are worth experimenting with, if you want a truly uncanny different look that forces people to look closely and think.
    post it here, sounds great!
    through a glass darkly...

  7. #7

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    Re: Double exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by jloen View Post
    I did a double exposure of water near a ferry dock that came out (I thought) quite spectacular, with a shimmering effect to the water that I really liked.
    I'd love to see that.

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