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Thread: Scanning large pieces of film

  1. #11

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    Re: Scanning large pieces of film

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Mahoney View Post

    Just to add to your list of options I thought I should mention another beast. The fellow who scans for me uses a Fuji Celsis 6250 (Crossfield):

    Richard

    Or how about a Screen DS 7060p? Will do up to 20X24" I understand. There is one on ebay now for $4k. Bet that monster cost close to $100k new.

    Sandy
    http://www.sandykingphotography.com/
    For discussion and information about carbon transfer please visit the carbon group at Yahoo.
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/CarbronTransfer/

  2. #12

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    Re: Scanning large pieces of film

    Sandy,

    Does your Pro allow you to scan in DT format?

    Thank you,
    SergeyT.

  3. #13

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    Re: Scanning large pieces of film

    Quote Originally Posted by SergeyT View Post
    Sandy,

    Does your Pro allow you to scan in DT format?

    Thank you,
    SergeyT.
    No, you need Pro II or higher for DT format.

    I scan B&W negatives in 8 bit RGB. I then convert to 16 bit RGB, and then to 16 bit grayscale before doing any tonal changes. Works fine.

    Sandy
    http://www.sandykingphotography.com/
    For discussion and information about carbon transfer please visit the carbon group at Yahoo.
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/CarbronTransfer/

  4. #14

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    78

    Re: Scanning large pieces of film

    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    ... So Keith could scan a 12X20" negative at the maximum resolution of 2540 spi of his EverSmart scanner, I could scan at 3175 spi with my EverSmart Pro, and if you are lucky enough to own an EverSmart Supreme or Select you could scan at 5400 spi, if you need that kind of huge print.
    ...
    Sandy

    At risk of thread drift, but for the sake of clarity, I was using the name EverSmart generically. My scanner is the Pro II model which has a maximum optical resolution of 3175 spi, same as Sandy's Pro. I'm running it with oXYgen 2.3.5 on a G4 MDD using OSX Panther.

    I'm not very clear on what the significant differences are between the Pro and the Pro II. Sandy also mentioned that his Pro does not have the ability to scan in DT format. (DT = Digital Transparency - Creo's version of a raw format - basically a 16 bit-per-channel tiff file with no software adjustments applied.) I'd love to discuss the EverSmarts in greater detail, but don't want to hijack this thread, so maybe I'll start a new one soon.

    Also, a couple of notes for others who may be interested in the topic of Clay's original post:

    The Screen Cezanne has a maximum original size of 13 x 20.9 inches.

    A couple of other well regarded drum scanner operators (besides Ian) that I believe have the capability of scanning 12x20 film are James Beck and Lenny Eiger.

    ~ Keith

  5. #15
    Just waiting to be developed..
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    Re: Scanning large pieces of film

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Mahoney View Post
    The data in the PDF brochure indicates that one can take it to 20" x 28", possibly at up to 8000 dpi (optical). Contra Ian, I'd say that there is nothing ugly about this machine. I'd be all too happy having it sitting in the corner, though I'm not sure how long our old wooden flours would support it. ... If you're able to track one down, together with someone who knows how to use it, then I'm certain it would do what you're after.
    Kind regards, Richard
    I meant it as a joke, just forgot to add the I love my scanners like children, ive even named them
    The fact that someone dreamt this up and had the skills to build it is amazing to me.
    The big and little ones are beautiful to me, actually i love all pieces of pre press tech, imagesetters, platesetters...

    The Celsis is big, not as big as a Hell scanner but still big. 1300lbs big and they donít move well.
    Ive seen 2 in the last few years that didnít make it. They tapped something and the top thats hinged got knocked out of alignment.
    That rendered them unusable, the lead screw and a few other things were damaged with that small tap.
    If you could get a qualified tech to lock it down and transport it, theyíre good scanners. The software is old and support has or is drying up.
    I could have bought at least 5 over the last 10 years but the space required and the cost to move it made it a poor investment.

    Screen scanners were good at the time but now support is almost gone. They made big and small scanners, some good some bad.
    I know of a few people who had them replaced by screen a few times for bad boards and faulty optics.
    On these big scanners, finding good drums, mounting stations and software is getting harder.
    I used to see them all the time on ebay but recently very little. It makes me think that people just threw them out.
    After 10-20 years in a heavy production environment a lot of them were not worth repairing. So some of them for sale arenít in good condition.
    They may scan but upon close examination the scans are bad, they may have lines or other artifacts.

    Hell scanners are also very good and will last forever. I still know a few people who support them (all of the hell scanners).
    The big issue is properly locking them down, getting the special wheel set and moving over a ton of steel and precision optics.
    -Ian Mazursky
    www.ianmazursky.com Travel, Landscape, Portraits and my 12x20 diary
    PrePress Express

  6. #16

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    Re: Scanning large pieces of film

    Quote Originally Posted by keith schreiber View Post
    I'm not very clear on what the significant differences are between the Pro and the Pro II. Sandy also mentioned that his Pro does not have the ability to scan in DT format. (DT = Digital Transparency - Creo's version of a raw format - basically a 16 bit-per-channel tiff file with no software adjustments applied.) I'd love to discuss the EverSmarts in greater detail, but don't want to hijack this thread, so maybe I'll start a new one soon.
    Keith
    Keith,

    The Pro and Pro II are identical except for the logic board. The Pro II scans faster because it has a more powerful logic board, and it is possible to scan in DT. If you can believe this, the logic board of the Pro is based on a 298 chip. That takes us back to the early or mid-90s!! Creo used to sell a conversion kit that converted the Pro to Pro II status and allowed use of Firewire. Might still be available but for the price of the conversion kit you could buy a used Eversmart Supreme.

    Sandy
    http://www.sandykingphotography.com/
    For discussion and information about carbon transfer please visit the carbon group at Yahoo.
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/CarbronTransfer/

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