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Thread: Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

  1. #1

    Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

    Just found and bought a whirly-gig on eBay that processes six 4x5 sheets in a Paterson roll film tank. Simple and ingenious, should be handy for E-6.

    4X5 whirly-gig

    (usual disclaimer, have nothing to do with the auction)

  2. #2
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    Re: Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

    boy that looks like a tough film holder to try and get even development........
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    "Vocation to Solitude -- To deliver oneself up, to hand oneself over, entrust oneself completely to the silence of a wide landscape of woods and hills, or sea, or desert; to sit still while the sun comes up over the land and fills its silences with light." Thomas Merton

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  3. #3

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    Re: Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

    This is the holder I'd asked about a month or so ago. A number of people have bought and used them with success I believe.

  4. #4
    Octogenarian
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    Re: Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

    Paul,

    The MOD insert for the Paterson 3-reel tank is made in the UK. Takes the place of the roll film reels.

    With shipping cost to the USA, the price is quite high.

    There have been a few discussions about the MOD insert on this forum. Some users have reported that it is difficult to load, and that the two outside sheets of film tend to fall out of their grooves, making it useful for only four sheets of film.

    After you have used it a few times, please post your results.

  5. #5
    Stefan
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    Re: Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

    This is a 13 page thread over on APUG about this insert:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/8...rocessing.html

    Seems like people are getting good results with it. I'm a bit tempted myself, I'm currently using the CombiPlan tank but it fills very slowly and the insert solution seems less fiddly.

  6. #6
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    Re: Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

    FWIW, I used the Combi Plan tank for a few years and everything seemed OK. Then one day I noticed some odd things in a blank grey sky. So I shot a perfectly even surface at middle grey and developed it-it was very uneven. No matter what I tried I couldn't produce a negative with that tank that was even by that middle grey test. Since then I have switched first to tray development, then to BTZS tubes, then to a slosher tray for various reasons. With each change I did the above test till I could get a perfectly even negative. Well there is never a perfectly even negative with any method. It is surprisingly difficult with any method, but I could never get it even close with the Combi Plan (or hangers for that matter-I tried them too) soooo maybe it is just me but personally I am wary of any device like this, which does not allow even free-flow of chemistry to the full surface of the film. Many aspects of this device, to me, would create currents during agitation which would produve unevenness in the negative.
    Last edited by Kirk Gittings; 10-Apr-2011 at 13:50.
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    "Vocation to Solitude -- To deliver oneself up, to hand oneself over, entrust oneself completely to the silence of a wide landscape of woods and hills, or sea, or desert; to sit still while the sun comes up over the land and fills its silences with light." Thomas Merton

    KIRK GITTINGS
    WEBSITE

    LIGHT+SPACE+STRUCTURE (blog)

  7. #7

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    Re: Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

    Hi, Kirk,

    I too am obsessed with even development and (perhaps even harder to obtain) even light in the enlargement process. I use a number of different developers and processing techniques and I've found that for stand development and PMK the combi-plan gives me even results - on par with a jobo. This most likely has to do with the frequent agitation cycles of PMK (every 10 seconds) and the long prewash and water bath that I use with stand development. Small tank processing is very prone to convection currents at rest, the larger the temp. differential the more pronounced its effects. Now when I do stand dev. in a combi-plan I submerge the tank in a temperature controlled water bath. Without it, my bald skies and grey walls look smudgy.

  8. #8

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    Re: Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

    The Combiplan is a real pain. Tried it once in college and couldn't agree with it. Too many parts, too finicky, too much touching the film getting it in place. Then of course the slow chemical flow issues and everything else. Ruined a few sheets in one and refused to use it again.

    Tempted though I was by that MOD tank, I much prefer using a Paterson Orbital. Less chemicals, immediate even negative coverage, and variable between formats. Fewer sheets at a time, but that's not so much an issue.

    I don't use an Orbital like it says in the book, mine is always overfilled to 250ml or so, and a gentle rotation on a flat surface makes sure the film inside is covered.

    Because I like to be a cheapskate with chemicals (money issues), any tank that requires as much as the MOD or a Combiplan is a no-no. However, if that wasn't an issue and I was shooting more 35mm/120 and wanted a universal system, the MOD looks the best option.

  9. #9
    Cordless Bungee Jumper Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Re: Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

    I tried tray development. Then I bought a Yankee Hanger Type 4x5 Developing Tank Model# 4944 from FreeStyle. Talked to the FreeStyle sales person I deal with. Traded in the Yankee Hanger Type 4x5 Developing Tank without using it for a Combi Plan tank. Then I talked to Per Volquartz, from whom I had taken a darkroom class in his home, and he recommended the Jobo 3010 Expert Tank with a Jobo Processor. I went back to FreeStyle and talked to the sales person who said that he uses that, that he had told me about it, and that it was expensive. I ended up returning the unused Combi Plan tank and bought the Jobo 3010 Expert Tank. I have been very happy with it and I can develop color film too! [I can process 35mm and 120 film too.]

    Steve
    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #10

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    Re: Blatantly obvious and truly ingenious

    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I tried tray development.... I went back to FreeStyle and talked to the sales person who said that he uses that, that he had told me about it, and that it was expensive. I ended up returning the unused Combi Plan tank and bought the Jobo 3010 Expert Tank. I have been very happy with it and I can develop color film too! [I can process 35mm and 120 film too.]

    Steve
    Sorry. I am not clear whether you use just the tank you say you bought or the 3010 tank and processor that the salesman used. Put another way, do you roll your own 3010 tank without benefit of CPA-2 or CPP-2?

    Just for reference I use a CPP -2.

    John

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