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Thread: Beginner's guide to developing 4x5" sheets

  1. #41
    Vlad Soare's Avatar
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    Re: Beginner's guide to developing 4x5" sheets

    Deep tanks do indeed take massive amounts of chemicals. You'll never be cost-efficient with one-shot developers in them.
    The efficient way of developing in deep tanks is to reuse the developer and replenish it on a regular basis. You mix two liters (or whatever you need) of full-strength developer and use it with several films, making sure you adjust the development time according to the manufacturer's recommendations (with ID-11 I believe it's +10% for each additional film, though I'm not very sure about it). From time to time you remove a little spent developer and replace it with the same amount of replenisher.
    I don't know if Ilford offers a replenisher for ID-11, but Kodak does. It's called D-76R (it's different from the developer itself - you shouldn't use D-76 as its own replenisher).

    Later edit: I see Ilford offers a replenisher for ID-11, too. Just make sure not to get it mixed up with ID-11 itself. The formula is different. Not by much, but different nevertheless.

  2. #42

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    Re: Beginner's guide to developing 4x5" sheets

    Thank you for the quick response Vlad, yes it is +10% per extra process. I may just get a tall skinny 1/2 litre tank made up by a local plastic fabricator who "owes me". I could then fit in 2 or 3 sheets and use diluted developer once-off. I believe it lasts about 6 months diluted if properly stored. It is 30 years since I last processed film and then, only 120 in a Paterson tank. It was so easy!

  3. #43
    Vlad Soare's Avatar
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    Re: Beginner's guide to developing 4x5" sheets

    I believe it lasts about 6 months diluted if properly stored.
    Not diluted. Only the full-strength solution keeps that long. If you dilute it 1+1 or higher, you must use it immediately and then dump it.
    Paterson tanks can be used with 4x5" sheets, too. See post #15 above.

  4. #44

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    Re: Beginner's guide to developing 4x5" sheets

    Keep your hands out of the developer. Repeated exposure may cause severe splitting of the flesh. I use one surgical glove. For drying, I put two wooden clothespins on a wire coathanger, hung on the shower rod. 4x5 goes on one pin, 8x10 on two. Use photoflo mixed weak.

  5. #45

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    Re: Beginner's guide to developing 4x5" sheets

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian C. Miller View Post
    Hi, Lucian!

    First, normal chemicals for developing black & white film are quite safe.
    Some people develop adverse reactions to the chemicals. I recommend limiting your exposure to all chemicals. If if is possible use gloves.

  6. #46

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    Re: Beginner's guide to developing 4x5" sheets

    Quote Originally Posted by stevebrot View Post
    I use the "taco" method in a generic Patterson-type plastic tank (<$20 USD) and it works well for 4x5. As noted, it requires about a liter of chemistry and is a bit of a waste. I am going to experiment with using developer diluted to 1/8 strength coupled with longer development times. So far no issues with scratches or uneven development (fingers crossed).


    Steve
    Steve,

    You can use less solution if you agitate continuously, either by inversion or by rolling your tank.

  7. #47

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    Re: Beginner's guide to developing 4x5" sheets

    Quote Originally Posted by cyrus View Post
    Ive posted this before so sorry about the dupe but here is a very simple solution to tray development of 4x5 negs. Just take a regular film holder (in this case the ones that hold 4 sheets of 4x5 negs) bend it so it fits and lays flat into an 8x10 tray. You can use the bent part as a handle to agitate and to move the holder from tray to tray.
    Interesting Cyrus. The bent stainless film holder is what I've been doing for years. I use a single sheet version for special N+ or N- times in tray. Single shot developer. Just have to be careful not to over agitate.

    Nate Potter, Austin TX.

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