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Thread: Sharp pyro developer that gives full film speed

  1. #21
    おせわに なります! Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
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    Re: Sharp pyro developer that gives full film speed

    I personally do one sheet at a time. As mundain as it is, film development is TOO IMPORTANT. Doing more than one sheet runs the risk of scratching the emulsion from not just the other sheets but from your finger nails (unless you wear rubber gloves). I've done 4 sheets at once, but they were in their own tray. If you are going to do semi-stand, do it one sheet at a time.

  2. #22

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    Re: Sharp pyro developer that gives full film speed

    I've gotten pretty good at developing a bunch together, no scratches on my last couple rounds and even development, but I certainly understand your point about the importance of each piece of film.

    Well, I ordered both pyrocat-HD and -MC and the chemicals to make -P, so I will see for myself! I have the sneaking suspicion that I will go through a bunch of tests and realize that there isnt a significant difference. But I can't resist.

  3. #23

    Re: Sharp pyro developer that gives full film speed

    Sandy,
    What effect can water quality have on development with the Pyrocats? I used to use tap water with both HD and MC and after switching to distilled water the negatives seem better. Hard to explain why, but they seem smoother, particularly in the shadows/clear parts(perhaps more film speed?). Is this just in my head or have you noticed differences?

  4. #24

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    Re: Sharp pyro developer that gives full film speed

    Quote Originally Posted by Vertex Ninja View Post
    Sandy,
    What effect can water quality have on development with the Pyrocats? I used to use tap water with both HD and MC and after switching to distilled water the negatives seem better. Hard to explain why, but they seem smoother, particularly in the shadows/clear parts(perhaps more film speed?). Is this just in my head or have you noticed differences?

    Pyro tanning developers are highly sensitive to water quality and if there is any problem with development my recommendation is always to first mix the stock and working solutions with some form of purified water. So it would not surprise me at all that switching from tap to distilled water would result in better negatives.

    Sandy
    http://www.sandykingphotography.com/
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