Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 37

Thread: Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    Redmond, WA, USA
    Posts
    119

    Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

    I just became the proud owner of an Ebony RSW45 from Robert White. I was wonderi ng if anyone had any good information about how I should care for the Ebony wood and the titanium?
    If I were king, things would be different. Worse!..no!...better! Except for you there with the pointy head and the questionable hygiene. Things would definitely be worse for you.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1,764

    Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

    Matthew: A lot of people may suggest you outsource that nasty maintenance.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Southern England
    Posts
    25

    Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

    Matthew: Don't take it appart, dont bath it, dust it, otherwise leave it alone unless it goes wrong.

    its a fine camera

    Robin

  4. #4

    Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

    You could send me the camera for a free evaluation of the required maintenance and suggested intervals.

    This evaluation can often take three to five years, and would require frequent use of the camera. Please send film as well, I have my own holders and meter.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Posts
    449

    Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

    First thing to do is to announce on the Internet that you own one. Why don't you mention how much you paid for it, too?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Mar 1998
    Posts
    1,974

    Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

    Two suggested methods:

    Film and plenty of it. Think of any scarring as badges of honor. This works if you are a photographer.

    metal and wood polish rubbed in with soft cloths. This approach works if you are a furniture collector.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Posts
    741

    Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

    If it gets wet then dry it with a cloth. If it gets dusty give it a brush. Easy!

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Redondo Beach
    Posts
    551

    Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

    I know how you feel, a couple of the others don't 'get it', you've just unpacked you're new 'pride 'n joy', and you're excited like I was by my first LF camera. Somebody doesn't like it, so what.

    I'm both a Photographer and Woodworker, get a can of Liberon furniture paste wax, the best, cost $13.90 and I've been working on the same can for 5 yrs!

    Use the wax on the metal and wood, it's more protection than you think, and whatever else scratches, nick, and/or marks you get, you get, but if it's made out of wood and you care about it, use the wax.
    Jonathan Brewer

    www.imageandartifact.bz

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Redondo Beach
    Posts
    551

    Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

    I own a metal field camera not a wook one, but I've seen enough of the Ebony to know that woodworking was done by a true Artisan. The bevels, the joinery is beautiful, sure it was made to be used, but waxing periodically is good for the wood, and is a gesture to the craftsman who put his time and sweat into the piece to say 'I appreciate what you did'.
    Jonathan Brewer

    www.imageandartifact.bz

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Redondo Beach
    Posts
    551

    Care and Feeding of an Ebony?

    Anything made out of wood is only as strong as it joints. Joinery with the right glue proprerly done, is almost as strong as the wood itself, and supplemental fasteners like screws are secondary. The enemy of bare wood and it joints in a workpiece is the sun/UV, and temperature/humidity swings, which causes expansion and contraction in both the wood and joints.

    Anything made out of wood and its joinery tends to get torn up not from use but from expansion and contraction which can cause the joints to fail. In an effort to combat all of this, any combination of stains, Danish oils, Shellacs(french polish), urethanes, and Spar varnishes are used.

    Spar varnish among these has the ability to flex with the wood as it expands and contracts, and is used on a workpiece that has to deal with being outside. Even though these overcoats can look like hard glass none of them are complete moisture barriers.

    Your wax is supplemental protection moisturewise and its biggest advantage is that it's simple, renewable, and cheap, and it cannot hurt and usually helps protect whatever finish the manufacturer has on a workpiece.

    I went through all this technical 'macaroni' to emphasize to Matthew that what will tear up a workpiece isn't necessarily use, but the elements, that's why you use the wax.
    Jonathan Brewer

    www.imageandartifact.bz

Similar Threads

  1. Care of wood and bellows etc.
    By e in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 4-May-2002, 20:13
  2. Care of Bellows
    By e in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 31-Aug-2001, 23:14
  3. Bellows care
    By Jack Leonard in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13-Jun-2000, 11:20
  4. Camera Care
    By josh_560 in forum Announcements
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 3-Mar-1999, 10:28

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •