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Thread: "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

  1. #1
    Nicolas Belokurov
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    "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

    I guess it's an aesthetics topick, so should be posted here.
    I've been shooting landscapes for some time and after some tests and experimentation, found out that for my personal taste, the 28mm on 135 and 90mm on 4x5 come very close to create that "like being there" effect on a normal print. They are wide, but not too wide and don't have that distinctive "in your face" look that is very popular now with the advent of accessible UWA lenses on digital and bothers me a bit.
    And since I've made few prints from this formats I can more or less visualize them on paper.
    But what about panoramic shots? There are a lot of 6x17 and 6x12 on the web but they are all tiny and I can't find any photos of prints to be able to really imagine how one of these actually look on a wall. Do anybody have "print" photos to share? Something like this: http://www.horolezec.cz/aktualni/eng...dnice2_en.html

    The other thing that really intrigues me, it's the old 6x12 vs 6x17 question, but from an aesthetics perspective. I'd like to hear from panoramic shooters on this topick. Which format creates the "being there" effect without the need of an excessive panning from the viewer, once hanged on the wall? I'm talking about a normal viewing distance for a fairly large print 1.2 or 1.5m wide
    For example, I've made this shot


    On the Lanin Volcano using a 28mm lens. My 90mm would be fairly the same on 4x5. But what panoramic format would be the most lifelike in this case? And what FR?
    All comments and input are really appreciated,
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Shutter's Avatar
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    Re: "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

    I'd say it's not only the format but the print size and quality that gets you that special "wow"-effect. Sure, a large format will provide you with a certain 'depth' but as long as the print size remains small I doubt that you're able to get that special feeling of actually being there... oh and a good exposure is required as well but that goes without saying

  3. #3
    Nicolas Belokurov
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    Re: "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

    Of course, the print size and quality is important. But I've noticed that the so called "normal viewfield" is normal just if referred to the central spot of the eyesight. When you actually are standing in front of a great scene, you really tend to pan, and you usually do so in a horizontal way. Perhaps, when confronted with a large print it works the same way- horizontal panning tends to be dominant.

  4. #4

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    Re: "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

    My feeling is that 6x12 is not terribly panoramic, but you could experiment a bit with cropping 4x5s to get the feel for that yourself. Try going out with your 90 and compose only for the 2:1 strip across the middle. Perhaps tape some paper on the GG. I would guess that 6x17 is needed to make a firm step in the direction of a real panorama.
    Website - Linhof Technika, Schneider 90/5.6 Super-Angulon, 210/5.6 APO-Symmar

  5. #5
    Nicolas Belokurov
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    Re: "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

    On 6x12, the 90mm would look like a 28mm on horizontal and 50mm on vertical, right? Or roughly like two 50mm shots stitched together.

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    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    Re: "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

    Quote Originally Posted by NicolasArg View Post
    Of course, the print size and quality is important. But I've noticed that the so called "normal viewfield" is normal just if referred to the central spot of the eyesight. When you actually are standing in front of a great scene, you really tend to pan, and you usually do so in a horizontal way. Perhaps, when confronted with a large print it works the same way- horizontal panning tends to be dominant.
    bang on
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    at age 67
    "The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep"

  7. #7
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    Re: "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

    Quote Originally Posted by CarstenW View Post
    My feeling is that 6x12 is not terribly panoramic, but you could experiment a bit with cropping 4x5s to get the feel for that yourself. Try going out with your 90 and compose only for the 2:1 strip across the middle. Perhaps tape some paper on the GG. I would guess that 6x17 is needed to make a firm step in the direction of a real panorama.
    Of course, you can crop 6x12 down to however thin a strip you want.

    For me, what makes a panorama look as though you could walk into it is that it provides a central view plus a peripheral view. That may need a big print, or a close viewing location. The only problem with a small print is that you have to be too close for it to fill the peripheral vision. Using a magnifying glass can help. I can get a "walk into it" look even inspecting a transparency directly if I have the right loupe.

    For me, it's not the shape of the print, but rather the perspective of the scene as presented to the viewer.

    Rick "who has seen lots of panoramas that don't have this quality" Denney

  8. #8
    Lachlan 717
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    Re: "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

    Nicholas,

    Also have a look at the 2.5:1 format. That's 6x15 in 120 format or 4x10 (inch) in sheet film.

    I sometimes feel 3:1 is too wide, whilst 2:1 just doesn't seem "panoramic" enough. The Chinese pano cameras have inserts to allow 6x15 images.
    Lachlan.

    You miss 100% of the shots you never take. -- Wayne Gretzky

  9. #9

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    Re: "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

    A 28mm on 135 has a horizontal angle of view of 65 degrees. A 90mm on 4x5 has about 70 degrees, I believe, so a touch more.
    Website - Linhof Technika, Schneider 90/5.6 Super-Angulon, 210/5.6 APO-Symmar

  10. #10
    Nicolas Belokurov
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    Re: "Just like being there" effect on Panoramic prints

    Quote Originally Posted by rdenney View Post
    Of course, you can crop 6x12 down to however thin a strip you want.

    For me, what makes a panorama look as though you could walk into it is that it provides a central view plus a peripheral view. That may need a big print, or a close viewing location. The only problem with a small print is that you have to be too close for it to fill the peripheral vision. Using a magnifying glass can help. I can get a "walk into it" look even inspecting a transparency directly if I have the right loupe.

    For me, it's not the shape of the print, but rather the perspective of the scene as presented to the viewer.

    Rick "who has seen lots of panoramas that don't have this quality" Denney
    Great point.... to compose an effective pano is a very difficult task. I've tried stitching before but it simply doesn't work for me, I can't concentrate on the scene. I'm not saying it can't be done, it's difficult and most stitched panos usually look like... well, stitched panos. There are few exceptions out there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lachlan 617 View Post
    Nicholas,

    Also have a look at the 2.5:1 format. That's 6x15 in 120 format or 4x10 (inch) in sheet film.

    I sometimes feel 3:1 is too wide, whilst 2:1 just doesn't seem "panoramic" enough. The Chinese pano cameras have inserts to allow 6x15 images.
    Actually when I read your comment, I made a little experiment. There is a huge map in the office I work. It must be 1.5 or 1.8 m wide and about 60 cm tall. I stood in front of it and at aprox 1.5 meters from the wall, voila, I was able to completely fill my field of view with the map and still be able to see a lot of details. It was really interesting. I measured it later and it's 60x160- 2.5:1. Very interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by CarstenW View Post
    A 28mm on 135 has a horizontal angle of view of 65 degrees. A 90mm on 4x5 has about 70 degrees, I believe, so a touch more.
    You are certainly right... it's more or less, not exactly the same.

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