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Thread: Ideal Developer for Film to be Scanned

  1. #31
    multi format
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    Re: Ideal Developer for Film to be Scanned

    hi jay

    to be honest i usually go the other way with my film.
    i scan some of my coffee-stuff ... it isn't tooo thin,
    but most of it i process so it is nearly bulletproof and print it.

    - john

  2. #32
    Eric Woodbury
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    Dec 2003
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    Re: Ideal Developer for Film to be Scanned

    From the scanner point of view, the image should probably be red. Less diffraction and the silicon photo diode or CCD in the scanner has its highest sensitivity in the red, actually at about 900nm. So maybe a near infrared image is best. That's odd.

    I'd vote for a neutral colored image.
    my picture blog
    ejwoodbury.blogspot.com

  3. #33

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    Sep 2003
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    Re: Ideal Developer for Film to be Scanned

    Thanks John. I've never been very satisfied with my scans of dense negatives. I have made some satisfying prints from very dense negatives in my darkroom, despite all the factors that conspire against a dense negative, and though I've only seen your work online, it seems you know how to make the most of your negatives, whatever their character.

    Eric,

    Maybe I'm confused (okay, I'm definitely confused), but when I think of scanning as an analog to printing, it seems to me the image density should be made up of what the scanner is LEAST sensitive to, just as image stain relates to printing paper. If the scanner is most sensitive to red, that seems to argue in favor of green density. It's entirely possible that I misunderstand the principles involved. In any case, it's good to see you posting.

  4. #34

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    Re: Ideal Developer for Film to be Scanned

    XTOL is my best compromise and in my work it will be because I print still most B&W analog and very seldom digital!
    And yes its the developer I know the best anyway, semse for my also very important!
    Its by the way my magic bullet;--))))

    Armin

  5. #35
    Beverly Hills, California
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    Re: Ideal Developer for Film to be Scanned

    Mr. Lee, my intuition can't help you with your state's lottery numbers, but intuitively speaking, here are some mutual funds I fancy:

    Janus Mid Cap Value
    Janus Overseas
    Fidelity Leveraged Company Stock
    Fidelity Convertible Securities
    Oakmark Equity and Income
    Vanguard Inflation Protected Securities

    And realestate advice:

    If you live in California, rent until the San Andreas fault shifts sometime in the next 20 years. And for the rest of the country, rent for the next 5 to 10 years, and invest the savings in the above named funds. If you are fairly young and live in New England, watch for the plunging value of homes as the home owning population ages from migration, retirement to southern states, and death creating an unabsorbed surplus of supply.

    There you go Mr. Lee. Please remit my advisory fee of $20,000 as soon as possible. Thank you.

  6. #36

    Re: Ideal Developer for Film to be Scanned

    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    Jay,

    The main point Chris Jordan is making, as I read what he writes, is that scanning 8X10 film at more than 2000 spi is a waste of time because film this size does not have more than 2000 spi of effective resolution. So if you were to scan it at 4000 spi you would just get larger files, with more grain, but no additional detail.

    However, scanning 35mm and medium format is another matter because these formats, with some cameras, are capable of capturing much more detail (easily up to 4000-5000 spi), and scanning a medium format negative at 3200 spi is likely to leave some resolution on the table. How a scanner deals with grain is very specific to the mechanics of the scanner itself.

    Basically, it is not so much a question of the fact that scanning at high resolution produces more grain than scanning at a lower resolution, which is generally true, but how do we minimize grain when scanning at high resolution.

    Sandy
    Hi Mr. King--sorry I'm late to the party, came across this thread and a question came to mind. In your experience, do different film formats benefit from unique scan resolutions as a general rule?

    I have chatted with a few folks at some of the scanning companies online. They agree that a large format negative has inherently more resolution than a smaller negative, and scanning at an overly high resolution creates massive files that fail to yield any better image quality. I was also told in some cases, overscanning may introduce technical errors that could degrade the image quality and/or corrupt the file itself. Their judgement was scan 4 x 5 and up in the 2000PPI range; MF around 2400-3600, depending on film format, scanner, tech, etc.; and 3600 + for 35mm, 126, 110, and so forth.

    Of interest was the notion that images made with pinholes and other lomographic gear, tended to benefit more from scans made at the low end of the spectrum for the film format used.

    Any thoughts you care to share, mon frere? (Sorry about that...)

    Kevin M.

  7. #37
    multi format
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    Re: Ideal Developer for Film to be Scanned

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Anderson View Post
    Interesting. Do you use caffenol C for most of your development?

    ...Mike

    hi mike
    sorry i missed this
    YUP
    most of my film has been processed in caffenol for the past 10, maybe 11 years.
    i've used straight caffenol c ( measured with tablespoons and instant coffee )
    and eventually i put a little ansco 130 in it ( now i put a little dektol in it instead )
    and then i bought a bunch of robusta beans ( green ) and i roast the coffee myself.
    i like the results i get better than instant ... maybe i am bias ?
    these days i split process most if not all my film. i mix a batch of dektol 1:8ish and
    instead of processing it for 8-9 mins in that .. i develop it for 4 mins in that, and then
    4 mins in the caffenol c with a tiny bit of dektol mixed in ... works like a charm.

    YMMV

    have fun !

  8. #38

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    Central Europe
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    Re: Ideal Developer for Film to be Scanned

    Is XTOL still the benchmark for most of you?

    I am looking for a developer that is of low toxicity (XTOL or better), comes as a liquid concentrate (don't like mixing from powder due to health reasons) and works great with a rotary processor (CPPx) and Ilford's FP4+/HP5. It should be a developer that possesses a certain formulation/manufacturing robustness and QC in order to allow for a single characterisation to be applicable for multiple batches.

    I focused on XTOL for the last years. Unfortunately, I find its preparation somewhat cumbersome, its need for short development times at 1:1 for FP4+ (I had to dilute it to 1:3 to ensure development repeatability) and I still have issues with streaks on denser areas from time to time. I don't care for low contrast negatives as long as DMAX < 2.5.

    What are your recommendations?

  9. #39

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    Re: Ideal Developer for Film to be Scanned

    Quote Originally Posted by Andre Noble View Post
    Mr. Lee, my intuition can't help you with your state's lottery numbers, but intuitively speaking, here are some mutual funds I fancy:

    Janus Mid Cap Value
    Janus Overseas
    Fidelity Leveraged Company Stock
    Fidelity Convertible Securities
    Oakmark Equity and Income
    Vanguard Inflation Protected Securities
    at the seven year mark, did you break even?
    Bill
    "There are a great many things I am in doubt about at the moment, and I should consider myself favoured if you would kindly enlighten me. Signed, Doubtful, off to Canada." (BJP 1914).

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