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Thread: Slow B&W

  1. #1
    ARS KC2UU
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    Slow B&W

    Greetings: I searched around on the site a bit looking for comments about slow B&W films but not finding much. I see Efke 25 and Adox 25 mentioned in a few threads. I haven't tried either of these yet. I'm wondering if there are any others... perhaps even some that are slower.

    I'm looking for a super slow and super sharp B&W film and would welcome some suggestions. I like to use small apertures and long exposures with moving water to get the flow lines. Works great with IR films and dense IR filters. I also have a Wratten 96 ND filter that I've used at times. Slows things down about 7-stops or so by my experiments.

    But just wondering what others have found to be the slowest and sharpest B&W films currently available. Thanks for any suggestions. Bob G.
    All natural images are analog. But the retina converts them to digital on their way to the brain.

  2. #2

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    Re: Slow B&W

    Quote Originally Posted by rguinter View Post
    I see Efke 25 and Adox 25 mentioned in a few threads. I haven't tried either of these yet. I'm wondering if there are any others...
    Rollei/Maco offers 25 ISO film in 4x5 and 8x10. I have some for 35mm, but I haven't used it yet and can't comment on its characteristics: http://www.rolleifilm.com/main.php?p=a

    If you haven't already come across it, you might find it useful to read this thread from last September entitled Efke v. Adox: http://www.largeformatphotography.in...ad.php?t=53190
    Cheers!

  3. #3
    Greg Greg Blank's Avatar
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    Re: Slow B&W

    Y. & Y not use a ND or several ND filters to yield a cummulative exposure reduction then you will have advantages like better tonal scale yet slower speed. Plus be able to use the film for faster exposures when needed without the filter using the native ASA. If it's the contrast look you want that can be done with print controls, development or even PS.

    I wish that Delta 400 was till around so I could use it with PMK.....but I don't always get what I want.


    Quote Originally Posted by rguinter View Post
    Greetings: I searched around on the site a bit looking for comments about slow B&W films but not finding much. I see Efke 25 and Adox 25 mentioned in a few threads. I haven't tried either of these yet. I'm wondering if there are any others... perhaps even some that are slower.

    I'm looking for a super slow and super sharp B&W film and would welcome some suggestions. I like to use small apertures and long exposures with moving water to get the flow lines. Works great with IR films and dense IR filters. I also have a Wratten 96 ND filter that I've used at times. Slows things down about 7-stops or so by my experiments.

    But just wondering what others have found to be the slowest and sharpest B&W films currently available. Thanks for any suggestions. Bob G.

  4. #4
    ARS KC2UU
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    Re: Slow B&W

    Greg: Yes my Wratten-96 3.0 ND filter can be used to slow things down considerably. But I'm still interested to know about the slower B&W (and color) sheet films. Regards. Bob G.
    All natural images are analog. But the retina converts them to digital on their way to the brain.

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    Re: Slow B&W

    The Efke 25 is pretty good in my experience and you can certainly get some nicely blurred water with it. The emulsion is mildly soft; some people have problems with scratched film. I've never had a problem.

    You may also consider looking into Efke's positive paper. It's a photo paper that processes as a direct positive print (there is no negative, you make a print in the camera). It has an ISO of about 2.


    Efke 25


    Efke Positive Paper

  6. #6

    Re: Slow B&W

    Try some Efke/Adox Orthochromatic 25. Very sharp - and cheap!

  7. #7

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    Re: Slow B&W

    Im still a fan of Adox Pan 25. It seems to be sharper and possibly finer grained than efke 25, although it is more expensive.

  8. #8
    ARS KC2UU
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    Re: Slow B&W

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulRicciardi View Post
    The Efke 25 is pretty good in my experience and you can certainly get some nicely blurred water with it. The emulsion is mildly soft; some people have problems with scratched film. I've never had a problem.

    You may also consider looking into Efke's positive paper. It's a photo paper that processes as a direct positive print (there is no negative, you make a print in the camera). It has an ISO of about 2.


    Efke 25


    Efke Positive Paper
    Paul: Now that is a marvelous idea for someone like me who likes to tinker with the unusual. A direct print right in the camera. I'll look into that.

    That first shot of the downed trees and flowing water is perfect. Exactly what I like to shoot for.

    Thanks. Bob G.
    All natural images are analog. But the retina converts them to digital on their way to the brain.

  9. #9

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    Re: Slow B&W

    Quote Originally Posted by rguinter View Post
    Paul: Now that is a marvelous idea for someone like me who likes to tinker with the unusual. A direct print right in the camera. I'll look into that.

    That first shot of the downed trees and flowing water is perfect. Exactly what I like to shoot for.

    Thanks. Bob G.
    Bob, glad I could help, I like slower films personally. Sometime about long exposures is lovely to me.

    The positive paper-it is a bit finicky and has a considerable amount of contrast when developed in a standard paper developer. However with a diluted developer it's pretty good. I've taken to using Diafine as a developer and find I can get better tones out of the paper with Diafine than I could with diluted Dektol.

    Good luck
    -Paul

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