Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26

Thread: What is Criticism?

  1. #11

    What is Criticism?

    Criticism is OPINION. Some criticism is of more value than other. A critique of photographic work from a novice, is less valuable that criticism from a source of great experience and education. Criticism from experts can be very valuable, and thought provoking. Criticisms are opinions, and like that perticular body orifice..."everybodys got one". If you can't stand criticism then don't show your work or ask for opinions. If hungry for growth...show your work to somone with experience and talent...and get constructive feed back. Any critic worth his/her salt, will give an opinion in a positive and constructive way, to help the artist improve with out destroying the artists ego and self esteem. Remember that self esteem comes from 'self'. It it comes from critics or others, it would be caller "other esteem"! A critiqe of ones' work from a respected artist, can be a learning, positive and growth experience. For those with thin skins.....and fragile egos,...don't bother. Just shoot for yourself, and be happy in your work. No sin in that.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    1,814

    What is Criticism?

    More from Edward Weston in 1948:

    "I will not criticize. I think art criticism is the bunk. The only thing critics do is psychoanalyze themselves."

    And another "Teaching? That's an entirely different story. It is possible to comment or "criticize" or talk to any young person, face to face, who comes for instruction, or to learn. That's a different story. But criticism through a third person-no! You haven't the right to talk about another person's work unlss you spend as much time on it as he has."

    Best holiday wishes to all! Merg

  3. #13

    What is Criticism?

    Aaron,

    Might I suggest that you go to the LensWork site and order and read "On Looking At Photograhs", a discussion between David Hurn & Bill Jay about just this very sort of topic.

    It should prove most rewarding ... especially if someone bought it FOR you as a Christmas present.

    Season's Greetings ... Walter

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 1998
    Posts
    1,987

    What is Criticism?

    Criticism is different from discussion and different from teaching, although all can contain elements of the others. Well that's just my opinion!

    At it's best criticism opens the eyes of the audience (and sometimes the creator of the work being discussed) to aspects of the work or body of work that the reader or listener was unaware of, and can open connections by placing the work under discussion intoa larger context. Also at it's best criticism can be the equivalent of the child crying 'The emperor has no clothes on!" when everyone else is oohing and ahhing.

    At it's worst criticism closes the eyes and ears with obsfucation and snobbery and just shuts off communication in genral.

    It is also important for an artist to develop a critical eye to seperate the chaff from the wheat, to search for what is true and honest in his or her own work, and discard and move past his or her false steps. It is also very important for an artist to develop a critical ear for listening to criticism and to ldiscern what is honest and true criticism as opposed to that whhich is facile and shallow.

    Those who say criticism isn't important tend (in my experience) not to grow. Even such originals as Weston and Picasso learned to listen to feedback to their work and learned when to just listen to their inner voice and shut their ears to those who didn't get it.

    I close with a quote from the fine English songwriter Richard Thompson. Spealking about his fans he once said: "They are worse than professional critics, they are amateur critics!"

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Mar 1998
    Posts
    1,987

    What is Criticism?

    Criticism is different from discussion and different from teaching, although all can contain elements of the others. Well that's just my opinion!

    At it's best criticism opens the eyes of the audience (and sometimes the creator of the work being discussed) to aspects of the work or body of work that the reader or listener was unaware of, and can open connections by placing the work under discussion into a larger context. Also at it's best criticism can be the equivalent of the child crying 'The emperor has no clothes on!" when everyone else is oohing and ahhing over the finery they are being instructed to admire.

    At it's worst criticism closes the eyes and ears with obsfucation and snobbery and just shuts off communication in general.

    For an artist it is important to develop a critical eye to seperate the chaff from the wheat, to search for what is true and honest in his or her own work, and to discard and move past his or her false steps. It is also very important for an artist to develop a critical ear for listening to criticism and to learn how to discern what is honest and true criticism as opposed to that which is facile and trendy -- even if it agrees with what you are showing.

    Those who say criticism isn't important tend (in my experience) not to grow. Even such originals as Weston and Picasso learned to listen to feedback to their work and learned when to just listen to their inner voice and shut their ears to those who didn't get it.

    I close with a quote from the fine English songwriter Richard Thompson. Speaking about his fans he once said: "They are worse than professional critics, they are amateur critics!"

  6. #16

    What is Criticism?

    If you want to read good art critisim, read Carter Ratcliff. He is amazing, and you can find his articles in Art In America. Honestly, after spending years learning to critisize literature, I found I prefered creating, that's why I changed over to making texts (wich is what I think a photograph is) rather than being critical, no mater how positive I tried to be -- and it is easier to be a negitive critic. Do you want to give birth to things, or be the social servics person? I got lost in the daze of my own intertexuality relating to my shared subjectivity ... Maybe you should take some critisim courses, or read some critics: Cleanth Brooks, Benedetto Croce's Aesthetica in Nuce is good for removing the fog. Not that I don't live in fog, it's just I'm livng too much right now to see beyond the day to day. The fog isn't a bad thing you know. It's a good place to hang out. Enjoy it ... it obscures the day to day reality wich sometimes sucks. Dean
    Dean Lastoria

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Redondo Beach
    Posts
    574

    What is Criticism?

    Picasso, if he wanted to, could paint like Rapheal, and any number of different styles. So when he paints both eyes on the same side of someone's face as their nose, I know he's doing this as a legitimate choice as opposed to this just being a constriction of someone who doesn't know how to paint.

    Their are 'con men' and/or 'Charlatans' who have made a fortune selling their 'splattered paint', and even blank canvases as art or abstract art. Much of this work had no frame of reference and was inscrutable, but some knucklehead critics would go ahead and project their thoughts and feelings 'inkblot style' onto these works anyway which gave validation to some of this phony bullshit.

    I defy anyone to explain how a blank canvas as art. I won't waste my time going to a museum to look at one, but I will go to the beach for the same feeling without the pretense.

    The best of abstract Art had some identifiable reference, and to me when it's so abstract that there's no reference there for anyone but the individual who produced the work it's not Art.

    Art is the highest form of communication, if nobody can know what it is, it isn't art, unless you consider splattered paint, doodles, scribbles, and blank canvases art.

    In considering legitimate Art, it ought to be possible to judge how well the artist did in his execution of his idea. The Charlatan can't do anything well since he can do it only one way, one gear, and he cons some critics into co-signing this bullshit as valid even though there's no way possible to explain or understand the 'so called art'.

    The best critics are the ones who know how to do it. Professional critics may have the insight but not the ability to execute, so they're essentially talking about something they can't do.

    People can also have a blind eye culture wise to great works of art. African Art was dismissed as simple and childlike until they asked Picasso about what he liked. Many of the scuptures and works of gold of African Art stem from the traditions of the Yoruba, a religion that is older than Christianity. The power of African Art stems not from an attempt at beauty but as a spiritual force.

    Picasso recognized this and said so, and the run was on, African Art is sought after and prized all over the world and has been for years. Shona scuplture which is relatively recent can bring $30,000 a piece.

    It's black humor, things that are of the highest order are dismissed, things that are unknowable as art except in the mind of its creator are 'inkblotted' into validation as legitimate art.

    The answer here for many is to not worry about it, do it because you love doing it. I agree that if you don't have a thick skin, don't ask anybody about your work. If you're only prepared to hear, "Yeah, I think it's great", asking folks their opinion gonna give you a lot of heartache.
    Jonathan Brewer

    www.imageandartifact.bz

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 1998
    Posts
    1,987

    What is Criticism?

    Joinathan,

    read (or better yet, see0 the play "Art".

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Redondo Beach
    Posts
    574

    What is Criticism?

    Ellis....I'll do that. Where can I get it in bookform?
    Jonathan Brewer

    www.imageandartifact.bz

  10. #20

    What is Criticism?

    How does the old saying go?

    Those who can, do.

    Those who can't, teach.

    Those who can't teach, write about it.

    This pretty much sums up my thoughts about critics...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •