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Thread: Signing Baryta Prints

  1. #1
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    Signing Baryta Prints

    I have been having some issues with signing some baryta prints. I had no problem with the Innova but the ILFORD Gold Fibre Silk Baryta has given me fits. On well aged prints, say 6 months old I have no problem but on fresh prints even two weeks old and open to the air the whole time many pens just skate on the surface or skip. I just did a test. Soft pencil won't work on either. On the 6 month print both worked fine but on the two week print a Sharpie wouldn't write at all and a Rapidograph (my preference) just skated and skipped. Any suggestions? I am not interested in signing the mat.
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    "When did photography become a desk job?" Kirk Gittings 2009

    KIRK GITTINGS
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  2. #2

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    Re: Signing Baryta Prints

    Have you tried Micron pens?
    http://www.sakuraofamerica.com/Pen-Archival
    They have them in different thickness, but I am not sure if they are thick enough for signatures.
    They are archival as well.

  3. #3
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    Re: Signing Baryta Prints

    Thanks Domenico. I just went out and bought a couple, .20 and .50. The .20 skated and skipped whereas the .50 worked just fine. Though I prefer a very fine tip it appears in general that I have been trying to use too fine a point on this paper and possibly other baryta papers too. After further testing the .50 seems to work well on everything. My Rapidograph was .30 and perhaps is too fine too. The Sharpie........well it is just a sharpie.
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    "When did photography become a desk job?" Kirk Gittings 2009

    KIRK GITTINGS
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    LIGHT+SPACE+STRUCTURE (blog)

  4. #4

    Re: Signing Baryta Prints

    I have some Marvy Uchida DecoColor fine line pens for signing RA-4 process prints. Ended up getting a white and a silver pen, and they work nicely on a slick surface. On my Polaroid manipulations, I just use pencil, since that is Fabriano art paper.

    How much bromide is in the new Baryta inkjet papers? I still have some old Oriental Seagull Bartya paper for B/W chemical prints, though I suspect the construction is different than inkjet papers.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat Photography

  5. #5
    Whatever David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Re: Signing Baryta Prints

    Harman Gloss FB AI uses the same base as Ilford MGFB IV, but it is subbed for inkjet. I think there are only a couple of companies making baryta paper base now, so it is probably the same base that is used for many FB papers as well as for inkjet papers.

  6. #6

    Re: Signing Baryta Prints

    Baryta papers of the past contained barium hydroxide. New Baryta inkjet papers contain barium sulphate. It seems to me that the paper companies, or perhaps the marketing, is changing the meaning of Baryta print. I think this is confusing for the art market. A traditional chemically printed B/W Baryta print is not the same as an inkjet Baryta, yet how would the end purchaser know any difference?

    I am not trying to pick a fight with this, but it certainly looks confusing. Barium sulphate is a whitening agent. Barium reacts with air, and historically the oxide has been called baryta, but not the sulfide. Barium hydroxide is actually a corrosive material. Someone want to explain all this?

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat Photography

  7. #7
    Whatever David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Re: Signing Baryta Prints

    I'm only reporting what I was told by Howard Hapwood from Harman at PMA a couple of years ago, shortly before Harman Gloss FB AI was released.

    I don't have any problem telling the B&W prints on Harman Gloss that come out of my HP B9180 from the fiber based prints I make in the darkroom, and in general I don't think that it is that difficult to identify an inkjet B&W print as such.

  8. #8
    Greg Lockrey's Avatar
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    Re: Signing Baryta Prints

    Have you tried using the inkjet ink and a Speedball type pen?
    Greg Lockrey

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  9. #9

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    Re: Signing Baryta Prints

    I use a Faber-Castell Pitt Artist Pen (black - S) for all my gloss papers. It works perfectly on the Ilford Gold Fiber Silk. My prints are done with a Z3100 using the gloss enhancer which is usually what I'm signing on. I use it to title and sign the prints on the white border of the print which only gets the GE. No skips at all.

    Jim

  10. #10
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    Re: Signing Baryta Prints

    As per baryta inkjet papers, from an Ilford press release quoted on LL.

    Baryta coatings were originally introduced to the Ilfobrom Galerie FB and Multigrade IV FB papers and then more recently adapted for its Galerie FB Digital fibre-base paper for use with digital laser printers (See next week's BJP for a detailed report on this). The Baryta coating sits above the fibre base of the new inkjet papers but underneath the active and protective coating layers. It prevents the emulsions soaking into the fibre base, which the manufacturer says enhances the detail of images. 'Added to this,' says Harman, 'the Baryta improves the depth and quality of printed blacks, whilst also enhancing the whiteness of the fibre base; allowing a much broader tonal range with greater detail in shadows and highlights.'

    'Photographic inkjet media have traditionally been born from a paper manufacturing heritage, but we believe our products are the first inkjet media to be born from technology, science and expertise founded in traditional photographic products,' says Hopwood. 'We believe there is no real comparison available in the inkjet market today. By using the same plant, the same equipment and the same development experts for our inkjet products as we use for our traditional monochrome photographic products, we have helped to bridge the gap in quality, essence and archival properties that has existed between traditional photographic prints and inkjet prints since the dawn of digital photography.'
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    "When did photography become a desk job?" Kirk Gittings 2009

    KIRK GITTINGS
    WEBSITE

    LIGHT+SPACE+STRUCTURE (blog)

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