Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 35

Thread: Technical Pan Film

  1. #1
    The Rookie
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Reno
    Posts
    373

    Technical Pan Film

    A friend just gave me an unopened box of 4x5 Kodak Technical Pan film. She had it in her freezer since 1992. I've been trying to find information on this stuff because I've heard that it was an impressive film. As usual, after a few minutes of Googling, I'm more inclined to seek advice from those who have experience. I only have 25 sheets. That doesn't leave much room for trial and error.

    My questions:
    What is this stuff good for?
    What kind of chemistry is best for it? (I normally use ID-11)
    Any tips for shooting and processing?
    Yeah. I'm familiar with Photoshop. It's the place I buy my film.

  2. #2
    Eric Woodbury
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,115

    Re: Technical Pan Film

    I think it is best used for very high contrast, N+4 or more. Combine this with its high red sensitivity and it is very interesting to use. I used a developer that was similar to POTA, but used metol instead. It is a very mild developer that I mixed myself, but it sure made for some unusual contrast with some control. Lately, I've tried PMK and I'm encouraged by this combo.

    Much of the info you will find on the net is from folks trying to make roll film Tech Pan behave like normal film with hi-res, so that they can make 35mm look like 4x5. If you are starting with 4x5, then I don't see any need for that approach.

    I would give more details, but even with those, it is a crap shoot. At high contrast, getting exposure correct is difficult. ASA is variable depending on how much red you have in the scene. Probably 6 or 12ASA is fine for starters.
    my picture blog
    ejwoodbury.blogspot.com

  3. #3
    Don Nelson
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    275

    Re: Technical Pan Film

    Quote Originally Posted by Jehu View Post
    A friend just gave me an unopened box of 4x5 Kodak Technical Pan film. She had it in her freezer since 1992. I've been trying to find information on this stuff because I've heard that it was an impressive film. As usual, after a few minutes of Googling, I'm more inclined to seek advice from those who have experience. I only have 25 sheets. That doesn't leave much room for trial and error.

    My questions:
    What is this stuff good for?
    What kind of chemistry is best for it? (I normally use ID-11)
    Any tips for shooting and processing?
    One usage was for extremely low contrast subjects (example: petroglyphs on sandstone). Image made at ISO 100. Develop in rotary jobo processor along with your TMX100 using dilute TMAX RS oneshot. Works very well (this was from a Sexton workshop) - I used this for a number of petroglyph images in the southwest on 8x10. I still have a little tech pan in cold storage.....

    this method easily gave equivalent of N+5 development.

    YMMV
    Don

  4. #4
    Nicholas O. Lindan
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    247

    Re: Technical Pan Film

    Quote Originally Posted by Jehu View Post
    A friend just gave me an unopened box of 4x5 Kodak Technical Pan film. She had it in her freezer since 1992.
    It is probably still good.

    Develop it in Technidol. If you can't get Technidol then try for Photographer's Formulary TD-3, as a last resort use POTA (you have to make it yourself from Phenidone and S. Sulfite).

    Don't waste it by developing it in Rodinal or HC-110. If you aren't willing to go all out with it then it is best to sell it on ebay to someone who will - you should be able to get ~$50 for the box.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    951

    Re: Technical Pan Film

    I much prefer Photgraphers' Formulary's TD-3 developer for tech pan. It controls contrast better and is easier to use than Technidol.

  6. #6
    Nicholas O. Lindan
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    247

    Re: Technical Pan Film

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Woodbury View Post
    Much of the info you will find on the net is from folks trying to make roll film Tech Pan behave like normal film with hi-res, so that they can make 35mm look like 4x5. If you are starting with 4x5, then I don't see any need for that approach.
    Making 35mm look like 4x5 is the purpose of the film. If all you want is high contrast then just get some microfilm - why bother with TechPan? Carrying a small camera and some light lenses with a fill-it-on-location beanbag for a tripod sure beats hiking around with a LF rig on your back - with TechPan scenes that are 50 miles from the road suddenly become photogenic.

    The purpose of shooting TP 4x5 is to make prints that look like 20x24 contact prints. Lots easier to haul a 4x5 on your back instead of a 20x24" Ebony.

    TP was originally developed for recording solar flares - hence the high red sensitivity at the 'hydrogen line'. This, and its lack of reciprocity failure with gas or mercury hypersensitization, made it the darling of the astronomy crowd.

    You can do other things with it, but it would just be a waste of the film - sell it on and buy some TMAX-100 with the proceeds.

  7. #7
    SF Bay Area 94303
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    431

    Re: Technical Pan Film

    Suppose we could talk Kodak into making a batch of Tech Pan? K

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Czech Republic
    Posts
    1,195

    Re: Technical Pan Film

    I shoot it in 4×5" at EI 25 and develop in Rodinal 1:100. Absolutely no grain, even scanned at 3200dpi, smooth, sharp, very nice tonality. Wonderful stuff.

    Here's a portrait of my daughter on this film (excuse the poor focus).

    Jiri Vasina
    www.vasina.net

    @ Google+ | @ Facebook | @ flickr

    My books @ Blurb (only heavily outdated "Serene Landscape").

  9. #9

    Re: Technical Pan Film

    Use Technidol or TD-3 (I preferred Technidol). Be very careful about dust; I never managed to cure my dust problems with this film in 4x5 and stopped using it for that reason. Otherwise, it scans wonderfully; it has relatively dramatic reciprocity failure (begins at 1/2 second, as I recall); and the red sensitivity does great things with skin tones but tends to make lips disappear.

    I tried it out as a high-contrast film, but it's hard to judge exposure and previsualization for that use, and you only have 25 sheets. I'd go the more traditional route, given your short supply.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NY area
    Posts
    1,033

    Re: Technical Pan Film

    I've tested nearly every developer combination for tech pan. The best pictorial results come from technidol but in 120 and 4x5 sizes developer mottling due to it's unusual agitation requirements is very common. I ended up using c-41 developer, in a jobo. It gives me an EI around 20 @ 68 degrees- 6'30". It's still an n+1 look so use it with lower contrast subjects or scenes for a little contrast boost.

    Here's a scene shot with Tech pan and processed in c-41:
    Last edited by Brian K; 27-Nov-2011 at 23:11.

Similar Threads

  1. Some observations on old Kodak 4x5 pack film
    By Chauncey Walden in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 22-Aug-2007, 21:20
  2. Some observations on old Kodak 4x5 pack film
    By Chauncey Walden in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13-Jan-2007, 12:03
  3. converting slides to B&W
    By Magnus W in forum Digital Processing
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 31-Jul-2006, 04:51
  4. 8K film recorders for repro vs. original film
    By bglick in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 21-Sep-2005, 10:38

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •