Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Wallaby Grass Seeds

  1. #1

    Wallaby Grass Seeds

    Whilst photographing indigenous wallaby grass seeds for the National Herbarium of Victoria using digital cameras and stacking technique I decided to take an image using my 4x5inch view camera.

    I used a 121mm angulon lens at a marked aperture of f/45 on 570mm of bellows extension yielding an effective aperture of f/211 and magnification of 3.7X on the film. I took both the dorsal and ventral views of the seed on different sheets of film. I then scanned and processed the negatives in photoshop.

    The image:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	rcaespitosa-small.jpg 
Views:	243 
Size:	18.0 KB 
ID:	179839

    The set up:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	viewcamerawallabyseed_800pix.jpg 
Views:	157 
Size:	62.7 KB 
ID:	179840

    peterkinchington.com

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Shodoshima, Japan
    Posts
    939

    Re: Wallaby Grass Seeds

    Nice! Reversed lens? How did you attach it to the lens board?

    Kumar

  3. #3

    Re: Wallaby Grass Seeds

    Hi Kumar,
    The lens is reversed however there is no need as the lens is symmetrical but I used a step up ring glued to the lens board to attach the lens.
    Cheers Peter

  4. #4
    Randy Moe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    9,366

    Re: Wallaby Grass Seeds

    Nice image.

    Thanks for posting.

    So many here say using a lens like that is soooo wrong.

    I like it!

  5. #5

    Re: Wallaby Grass Seeds

    Hi Randy,
    Thanks. I use the small aperture to get maximum depth of field in photomacrography - I am willing to trade off diffraction for dof.
    Cheers Peter

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Mt. Pleasant, Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    135

    Re: Wallaby Grass Seeds

    Peter, You might be interested in the LF images of botanical subjects by Gayle Moore here in the US. However, she developed a technique of placing the subjects on a back-lighted translucent panel (like a light table), so the backgrounds in her images are a creamy (dreamy?) white, instead of black as in your image.
    ... JMOwens (Mt. Pleasant, Wisc. USA)

    "If people only knew how hard I work to gain my mastery, it wouldn't seem so wonderful at all." ...Michelangelo

  7. #7

    Re: Wallaby Grass Seeds

    Hi JMO,
    Gayle has some nice images. I chose black as a background so the seed images with their fine hairs stood out. I did toss up whether to use a white background or not - I think I will try it with this subject with frontal fill flash and post it on this thread for you.
    Cheers Peter (Kanga)

    peterkinchington.com
    Last edited by peterkinchington; 27-Jun-2018 at 19:04. Reason: better wording

  8. #8

    Re: Wallaby Grass Seeds

    Quote Originally Posted by JMO View Post
    Peter, You might be interested in the LF images of botanical subjects by Gayle Moore here in the US. However, she developed a technique of placing the subjects on a back-lighted translucent panel (like a light table), so the backgrounds in her images are a creamy (dreamy?) white, instead of black as in your image.
    Peter—love the photo! JMO I went to Gayle’s site and looked through, they are lovely but are you sure they are not actually a negative representation?
    --- Steve from Missouri ---

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Mt. Pleasant, Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    135

    Re: Wallaby Grass Seeds

    Gayle is a member of the Midwest LF Asylum and has shown images at each of the last several Print Reviews in January. One year she showed mostly her botanical images, for which she has published a book, and explained to our group about her technique. I confess I don't recall the details of her technique, but I don't believe they are negative representations. Rather, she makes her silver gelatin prints from 4x5in B&W negatives through enlargement onto traditional B&W papers (so yielding a positive image). Since her subjects are back-lit, any leaves or other thin tissues transmit some of the light, which adds interesting lines, texture and details to the images.
    ... JMOwens (Mt. Pleasant, Wisc. USA)

    "If people only knew how hard I work to gain my mastery, it wouldn't seem so wonderful at all." ...Michelangelo

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    434

    Re: Wallaby Grass Seeds

    I used a 65mm f8 Super Angulon, a 90mm 5.6 Super Angulon and a 58mm 5.6 Grandagon very successfully to photograph rare stamps and coins 1:1 for a national company. I still have transparencies packed away somewhere. I don't see how they could have been any better with special macro lenses. The film can only resolve so much.

Similar Threads

  1. Dandelion Seeds 10:1
    By peterkinchington in forum Image Sharing (LF) & Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 7-Apr-2018, 05:57
  2. Grass
    By Joe O'Hara in forum Image Sharing (LF) & Discussion
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 1-Oct-2016, 00:10
  3. Post Yer Grass!
    By Stanley Kubrick in forum Image Sharing (LF) & Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 9-Apr-2013, 13:16

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •