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Thread: Rotary Processing Rodinal

  1. #11

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    Re: Rotary Processing Rodinal

    Please explain the fancy (to me) pipette. Where, who, what, and how much? TIA Nice detailed images.

  2. #12
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Re: Rotary Processing Rodinal

    Quote Originally Posted by Clueless Winddancing View Post
    Please explain the fancy (to me) pipette. Where, who, what, and how much? TIA Nice detailed images.
    The pipette is called a Mohr type and I have the 10ml and 2 ml in glass and some disposable 1 ml also. I got the glass pipette and rubber bulb from a scientific supply company many years ago. I had been thinking about getting a spare, in case of a break. I found this link but have not purchased from them. They have the Mohr pipette and the rubber bulb.

    http://www.pelletlab.com/lab_supplies_pipettes.htm

    $3.55 for the glass 10cc Mohr pipette. I remember paying much more, this seems like a really good deal. The rubber bulb is $9.95

  3. #13
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    Re: Rotary Processing Rodinal

    I have done about 20 or so rolls of film and only have had one roll that had uneven development on one edge. Perhaps it was not a processing error, and something else caused it. I was able to print images from the roll OK but it was tedious burning in the Right edge of the frame to get it too look like it was not burned in.

    So I have used TMX and TMY in both 120 and 35mm all with the Jobo Plastic reels, and 1500 series tanks. Doing up to eight 35mm rolls at a time with nominal 1:100 Rodinal dilution. Overall there has been excellent evenness of development.

    I know from experience and common sense that a single 12" 35mm sensitometer test strip processed solo will have much more density than the same sensitometer exposure included on a 12" segment of an exposed whole 36 exposure roll.

    What I also noticed was less density (less slope) of the sensitometer exposure when eight 36 exposure rolls are processed vs a single 36 exposure roll. Since the amount of Rodial per roll does not change (always 10cc per roll) I think it is the cumulative time to fill and empty the tank that leads to the discrepency.

    A single roll uses 140ml which empties and fills quite quickly. Processing 8 rolls requires 900ml and over the course of about 7 or 8 changes of developer the fill/empty time adds up. I have been just letting the Graylab timer just run as I fill and empty. I think I will keep doing it this way and just increase my total development time and re-check the sensitometer strips because I almost NEVER process 1 or 2 rolls at a time. I keep all the film frozen and when I get 8 or 10 rolls shot I get out the processor and spend a day just processing film.

  4. #14
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    Re: Rotary Processing Rodinal

    I know this is the "Large Format" forum but one of the reasons I am interested in eveness of development is that I want to start processing 4x5s in the plastic reels, the theory being that if I have optimized 120 film processing to minimize or eliminate excess density at the edges etc, the 4x5 film may respond well also.

    I know the "expert" drums are supposed to be better but they hold less film and are very expensive. The goal is to cram as many 4x5s into the 2400 series reels as possible and still get excellent processing. If they don't come out perfect I will have to go to the expert drum.

  5. #15
    Ted Harris's Avatar
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    Re: Rotary Processing Rodinal

    I gave up on the smaller drums years ago. Just not worthe the time it took me to load them and the possibility of edge issues.

    BTW, I have been developing B&W in Rodinal for some 30+ years. Currently I use an ATL 2300. My standard processing for Acros 100 rated at 100 is 20 degrees C. for 6 minutes and 10 seconds with 25 rotations per minute.

  6. #16
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Re: Rotary Processing Rodinal

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Harris View Post
    I gave up on the smaller drums years ago. Just not worthe the time it took me to load them and the possibility of edge issues.

    BTW, I have been developing B&W in Rodinal for some 30+ years. Currently I use an ATL 2300. My standard processing for Acros 100 rated at 100 is 20 degrees C. for 6 minutes and 10 seconds with 25 rotations per minute.

    I have never felt it was a problem to have TOO much Jobo equipment, so I will probably end up with a 2500 drum and an expert drum.

    BTW: How does one WASH the negatives when using the expert drum? I suspect they need to be removed from the drum to make shure any residual is removed from the back side of the negative. So I might need some kind of sheet film washer?

  7. #17
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    Re: Rotary Processing Rodinal

    Since you have space for six processes I wash the film three times after fixing it in the drom and that works fine. If you want to you can go the next step and use some sort of an archival washer although a tray with a hose attached works fine too.

  8. #18
    Format Omnivore Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Re: Rotary Processing Rodinal

    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    BTW: How does one WASH the negatives when using the expert drum?
    I do it by simply filling the drum, rotating it a while, and then changing the water. Repeat as necessary. I fill up the drum so its about half-full, and then listen to the KA-SHLOOSH-KA-SHLOOSH-KA-SHLOOSH sound it makes.

  9. #19
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    Re: Rotary Processing Rodinal

    After convincing myself that it is POSSIBLE to rotary process the T-max films in dilute Rodinal with very even development, I should commnet on the pictoral quality of the negatives (6x9cm and 6x6cm).

    I am very pleased with the tonal scale, it is a change from the T-max I am used to. I printed quite a few negatives of snow scenes and the tonal scale was unique. I suspect this may be from the little dip near the shoulder on the film curve. The snow, in some scenes, almost looked like chrome when the negatives were printed to show density in the snow. I suspect the actual exposure would dictate where the dip was having its effect on the scene. I don't have sensitometric data of my snow scenes to say if the snow highlights or snow textures, or which part of the snow was falling on the dip in the characteristic curve. Anyway the pictures look great, I like the look.

    In terms of sharpness, there is no question there is a precieved increase in sharpness (just by comparing negatives side by side with an 8x loupe) I don't get into film resolution tests. If it "looks sharper" to me then it "looks sharper." Thats all I can say. It looks sharper, I can see a difference.

    In terms of 'edge effects' I will say, I don't know. First I want to define what I mean by 'edge effects' because I may not be seeing the right thing.

    I have never actually SEEN an actual photograph by Faye Godwin, however, I love the reproductions in her book "Land." The reporoductions in this book have a special quality (that I don't see as much in her later books). All the little blades of grass seem to stand out with exceptional razor sharp detail; more than I would expect from just the optical properties of her Zeiss lenses. I have used those same Zeiss lenses (probably 40, 50, 80 and 120?) for years and my grass does not look like that with the Tmax dev/Tmax film combo. (Of course the grass in England may be different than the grass in Ohio )

    The repoductions of Godwins pictures have a great "Sense of Sharpness" that I want to duplicate. I, unfortunatly, don't know anything about how she processed her film (I need to explore this thread though http://www.largeformatphotography.in...ghlight=godwin) but I have read Barry Thorton's book "Edge of Darkness..." and comparing his annotated photographs to those in Godwin's book I came to the conclusion that edge effects are why Godwin's work has that great look. After reading all Thorton has to say about developers, it seems that good old Rodinal can do just about the same thing as all those developers that need to be mixed from powder (dilute Perceptol, DiXactol, etc).

    Now I am probably getting back to the argument that I don't want to get into: Edge effects with Rodinal, are they from intra-emulsion diffusion or extra-emulsion diffusion or both? Do you need to do stand deveopment or will rotary give the same effect?

    I guess, without wanting to neccessarily be in this position, I can make a conclusion about the above statements by just 'stand developing' a few rolls and giving the negatives the eyeball test with the loupe. I mean, if "I CANT SEE A DIFFERENCE" then there is no difference that matters to me.

  10. #20
    Jac@stafford.net's Avatar
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    Re: Rotary Processing Rodinal

    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    [... snip excellent article ...] In terms of sharpness, there is no question there is a precieved increase in sharpness (just by comparing negatives side by side with an 8x loupe) I don't get into film resolution tests. If it "looks sharper" to me then it "looks sharper." Thats all I can say. It looks sharper, I can see a difference.

    In terms of 'edge effects' I will say, I don't know. First I want to define what I mean by 'edge effects' because I may not be seeing the right thing. [... snip more good stuff ...] Barry Thorton's book "Edge of Darkness..." and comparing his annotated photographs to those in Godwin's book I came to the conclusion that edge effects [...]
    I am involved by the phenomena of acutance. You might be referring to page 24 of Barry Thornton's Edge of Darkness, which is quite good and if I were not so skeptical of web-presented images I would offer my own images.

    I think we are seeing the kind of effect which causes grain clusters to empathize abrupt, in-focus detail; not real edge-effect as I imagine. We remain, I think, on the same quest.

    Thanks for the engaging post.
    --
    Jac

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