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Thread: Time Savers in the Field

  1. #1
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    Time Savers in the Field

    I was reminded the other day, as I missed by about 2 seconds the good light on a scene, about how fleeting good light is and how quickly you have to shoot oftentimes to get it.

    What do you do to speed up your setup time and exposure process to catch the super fleeting light?

    A couple of things I do (in no particular order):

    1) Keep a super flexible cable release permanently on each lens.

    2} Mark my lens wraps with white letting so I get the lens I want first try.

    3) Use a quick release tripod head.

    4) Use step up rings on all lense up to the size of my largest lens (left permanenty on the lens) and lens caps to that size so all filters and caps are interchangeable.

    5) Set up tripod, finding my POV by putting my chin on the tripod head rather than doing that with the camera on and repositioning it by looking through it each time.

    6) Practice setting all lenses adjustments from behind the camera (I can't do this with shutters that don't have aperture click stops).

    7) Meter for the shadows and let the highlights go (unless it is a super contrasty situation).

    8) Practice setting up the camera (I don't need to do this any more as I have done this for a living for 30 years, but it was useful when I started).

    What do you do?
    Last edited by Kirk Gittings; 15-Oct-2006 at 13:29.
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    at age 67
    "The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep"

  2. #2

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    Re: Time Savers in the Field

    Kirk,
    Great subject and great tips. These are going in the notebook. Keep them coming. Thanks?

    _Tony

  3. #3
    Eric Biggerstaff
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    Re: Time Savers in the Field

    Well these are good.

    I keep cables on each lens.

    Insted of lens wraps I keep them in a Gnass gear case that holds four, so with one quick zip I can grab what I want

    Keep my spot meter on a lanyard around my neck so I don't fumble looking for it.

    I use a viewing card constantly to help me with subject relationships, finding the best spot for my trip pod, helping with lens selection, etc. I make mine out of flexible plastic and keep one in my back pocket. This probably saves me the most time.

    Keep the camera set up in the car with the 210mm on it, so I don't have to fish around for stuff if light is happening.

    Those are few more.
    Eric Biggerstaff

    www.ericbiggerstaff.com

  4. #4

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    Re: Time Savers in the Field

    Kirk, I do all of your "8" except 5. I'll have to try that. Instead of lens-wraps I use two Knass cases, with the lenses always in the same order.

    I use a "Photogs vest" in which I carry everything but camera and lens. The Toho is light enough that I leave it on the tripod, without a lens. All I need to do is mount a lens and slip on the dark-cloth.
    Last edited by Ron Marshall; 15-Oct-2006 at 13:43.

  5. #5
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    Re: Time Savers in the Field

    On our trip to Chaco, Eric turned me on to the Gnass Rapid Load File Pouch for keeping readyloads and holder organized and convenient. I ordered one but haven't got it yet. It could prove very useful. I like the idea of the Lens case too. I just ordered two.
    Last edited by Kirk Gittings; 15-Oct-2006 at 14:42.
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    at age 67
    "The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep"

  6. #6
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    Re: Time Savers in the Field

    Ron. I got that trick from Fred Picker. It works best with field 4x5's as you eye ends up about at lens level.
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    at age 67
    "The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep"

  7. #7

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    Re: Time Savers in the Field

    1. I keep my Arca S with both standards constantly on the rail in a special case. It can even have a lens of choice on.
    2. If I know I go for a "fleeting scene" and I don't need movements I take my special cameras that are locked with focus on infinity (meteorological pictures). I always try to foresee if the light is too quick and I choose the camera according to it.
    3. I use RFH, even on a monorail, if the format allows. Less hassle with multiple exposures.
    4. Strict order in the camera case allows me to work automatically, taking the accessories out in a "subconscious" mode.

  8. #8

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    Re: Time Savers in the Field

    I get to the scene with plenty of time.

  9. #9

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    Re: Time Savers in the Field

    When I am shooting from the car, I keep the camera on the tripod, my favorite lens on the camera, filters and holders in one of those geekly Zone IV belts, incident meter in my pocket - much faster IF it works in the situation, and I have a mulitfocus view finder on the camera so I can sight in the POV as I go. If I am really in a hurry, I just frame and focus with the rangerfinder. Nothing faster than a Technika or Graphic in a pinch.

  10. #10
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    Re: Time Savers in the Field

    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Cote View Post
    I get to the scene with plenty of time.
    And when that is not possible?
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    at age 67
    "The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep"

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