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Thread: photoshop technical introduction

  1. #1

    photoshop technical introduction

    Hello. Please - before you will shot me down because of this post, let me explain you what I am after. I am also a rather bad photoshop 7 user and I would like to improve my knowledge in this way. I do not own any photosho guide book yet, but getting through other posts in this forum I realised that pepople mostly ask about the books which would explain how to properly apply the tools the photoshop is offering. In this sens I am considering to order John Saw's Photoshop Guide, but this is not my question. I would like at first learn the logic of the photoshop - how to use all those tools like layers, actions etc... which are not so simple to understand - so the technical stuff. Like in programming - you first have to learn the laguage itself and than you leran the programming.

    So I am after some reasonable TECHNICAL book about photoshop 7 or CS2 (I am considering). Thanks.

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    photoshop technical introduction

    I would put Real Worl Photoshop (David Blatner and Bruce Fraser). It explains how things work in Photoshop very well. There is a Photoshop CS2 version (as well as a Photoshop 7, among many others). By far it is my favorite Photoshop technique book.

  3. #3

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    photoshop technical introduction

    How do you learn? I have two Photoshop books because I learn by doing and use books as references. the problem with many books (for me anyway) is that apply to a single version and use examples I don't often do (often with the CD with the book. A suggestion would be to start simple with the processes of importing, editting, and printing an image. Use an image you have and with each step simply go through the basic menu option to see what each is about and test some to see what they do. You can always exit without saving and start over. After that a explanation or reference book explaining the menu options may work. This will get you used ot the language and options in Photoshop and processing images. Good luck.
    --Scott--

    Scott M. Knowles, MS-Geography
    scott@wsrphoto.com

    "All things merge into one, and a river flows through it."
    - Norman MacLean

  4. #4

    Join Date
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    photoshop technical introduction

    The Fraser/Blatner Real World Photoshop series (for each version of Photoshop) is the best written, most informative book on the market. While most of the books take a cookbook's recipe approach, the Blatner/Fraser books explain why you want to do something in plain, clear, concise language.

  5. #5
    Abuser of God's Sunlight
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    photoshop technical introduction

    another vote for fraser/blatner.

    i used photoshop for over ten years in graphic arts, learning by the seat of my pants. last year for the first time i started using it for my personal photography, and decided it was time to REALLY learn what i was doing. fraser and blatner got me there. i usually dislike books on software, but their writing stands out. actually enjoyable to read.

  6. #6

    Join Date
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    photoshop technical introduction

    Real World Blatner/Fraser is also my favourite. I have read six Photoshop books, and spent many hours in a bookstore evaluating most of the others. Another which I intend to buy once it is released this July is Photoshop CS2 Artistry Barry Haynes.

  7. #7
    Kirk Gittings's Avatar
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    photoshop technical introduction

    I second the recommendation for Real World Photoshop.
    Thanks,
    Kirk

    at age 67
    "The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep"

  8. #8
    jadphoto
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    photoshop technical introduction

    Matus,

    I would agree with the above and add that anything by Tim Grey is a winner. I'm currently working with Photoshop For Nature Photographers by Tim and Ellen Anon and it is spot on for what I needed to work on.

    Some people learn well from books, others not so much. You may be better off in a class or workshop setting. Most community colleges now offer Photoshop/Digital Photography courses or workshops. Are you in California? If so, or if you don't mind traveling, check out UC Santa Cruz Extension and look for weekend workshops taught by Sean Duggan. Sean really knows Photoshop, and he knows how to teach. You don't often find both in one person.

    Many of my students are overwhelmed by the hundreds of things that can be accomplished with Photoshop. Just remember that most of us only need to learn a dozen or so for most of our images.

    Hang in there, it can be a bugger but it is worth it once you get it down.

    Joe D.

  9. #9

    photoshop technical introduction

    Thnaks for your tips.

    -Joe-

    some class or workshop is definitely good idea, but I am very far from CA. I am currently in Germany. But not beeing a native german speaker (I came from Slovakia) I am not on the language level to take a class here. I am just saveing some money for my first LF (maybee on Photokina I will break down and get something) and trying to lear as much as possible in digital and 35mm photography. Maybee I take it from the wrong end, but I feel like having an equippement for 1000 euro and not beeing able to produce a print is strange. So I am starting with Photoshop and monitor calibration and scanner will be comming.

  10. #10
    jadphoto
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    photoshop technical introduction

    Matus,

    Your English is obviously excellent so any of the books that have been recomended should do just fine.

    Let me re-emphasize that most Photoshop books will show you how to do everything. You really only need to become proficient with a relatively small percentage of what Photoshop will do. Afterall, it was originally designed for graphic designers not photographers.

    If possible, try to spend some time looking at the books you are interested in. You will find some are written in technical English and others in real English (the kind that most of us really use). Tim Grey's writing style is very conversational which makes his books (he has a bunch out with more on the way) very easy to read and comprehend. He also has a web site that you could subscribe to that answers questions on Photoshop/digital photography on a daily basis.

    If you are planning on large format don't underrate the value of contact printing. You can learn a lot with a very simple temporary darkroom set up.

    Let us know how it is going.

    Joe D.

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