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Thread: What's your EI for HP5 and PMK?

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2017
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    148

    Re: What's your EI for HP5 and PMK?

    I've never shot it in sheets, only shot the 400 version in 120 format. I didn't know it was entirely different though, interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post
    One cannot use TX400 in 8x10 since it's not manufactured. The 8x10 version of TRI-X is 320TXP, an entirely different film with a very dissimilar characteristic curve.

  2. #12
    Drew Wiley
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    Sep 2008
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    Re: What's your EI for HP5 and PMK?

    Tri-X, either version, is a different animal from HP5 anyway, so not an appropriate analogy. But even though the roll film and sheet film emulsions of HP5 seem identical, the visual effect in the print itself relative to degree of enlargement can be dramatically different, esp per edge effect. So after a reasonable ASA has been determined, you really need to fine tune things actual, per both film format and print. I don't personally shoot it in anything but 8x10. Even 4x5 enlargements look mushy to me, while 8x10 sings up to around a 20x24 print.

  3. #13

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    Oct 2017
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    148

    Re: What's your EI for HP5 and PMK?

    Drew, can you explain what you mean by edge effects? Do you mean sharp transitions between highlight and shadow/midtone?

  4. #14
    Drew Wiley
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    Sep 2008
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    Re: What's your EI for HP5 and PMK?

    Yes, that's basically the meaning, also known as "Mackie line" effect. With the combination of HP5, PMK, and sufficient development, you can get a wonderful almost etched effect. But this also depends on the degree of enlargement. Over 3X it starts falling apart on HP5 and goes mushy. PMK induces what is called "watercolor effect" with HP5, which blends and hides grain grittiness, while at the same time enhancing edge effect. That is why, for the exact opposite reason, some street photographers like HP5 in small formats - for its softness when significantly enlarged (not my cup of tea). If 8x10 HP5 is used for moderate contrast scenes then slightly overdeveloped, it's simply wonderful for microtonality and edge effect. For higher contrast scenes, as long as shadow exposure is sufficient, overdevelopment plus supplementary unsharp masking yields a similar result. But I greatly prefer TMY400 or now-extinct old "straight line" films like Bergger 200 or Super XX for true high contrast work.

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