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Thread: The perils of expired film

  1. #11

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    Re: The perils of expired film

    Expired film generally isn't worth your time to fully setup any kind of Large format camera for tripod work IMO. If your just shooting a Speed Graphic hand-held for fun or doing practice shots sure. Even unopened boxes aren't a guarantee..

  2. #12
    Serious Amateur Photographer pepeguitarra's Avatar
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    Re: The perils of expired film

    Did you wash your hands before taken the photos? It looks like you had your finger dirty (with grease from your forehead) and touched the lens. Isn't that the way they soften the areas around the face in the old days?

  3. #13

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    Re: The perils of expired film

    Part of the OOF issue is that the film might have an unequal moisture content that is causing it to buckle in holder... Loading the film way in advance of shooting, and maybe storing the Ziplocke'd holders in bags in the fridge will restore an even moisture content to it???

    Sometimes if the film was in deep freeze too long before, there can be a freeze burn that is hard to equal out before development...

    The other issue might be thinning of emulsion due to drying, that's causing it to unevenly develop... (A long water bath pre-development might help...)

    Steve K

  4. #14

    Re: The perils of expired film

    It is most definitely a problem with the scanner.

  5. #15

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    Re: The perils of expired film

    Quote Originally Posted by LabRat View Post
    Part of the OOF issue is that the film might have an unequal moisture content that is causing it to buckle in holder... Loading the film way in advance of shooting, and maybe storing the Ziplocke'd holders in bags in the fridge will restore an even moisture content to it???

    Sometimes if the film was in deep freeze too long before, there can be a freeze burn that is hard to equal out before development...

    The other issue might be thinning of emulsion due to drying, that's causing it to unevenly develop... (A long water bath pre-development might help...)

    Steve K
    great points to consider with old film. My first thought were similar, buckling of the film in the holder due to moisture or warping of the film over time.
    mostly I run into fog, uneven fog, and color shifts.

    good luck! the tones look nice.
    ~nicholas
    lifeofstawa
    stawastawa at gmail

  6. #16
    David Lobato David Lobato's Avatar
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    Re: The perils of expired film

    I’ve had 20+ year old and poorly stored Arista 125 8x10 film that had an ugly mottled fog, but not in all sheets. And an old box of 4x5 Agfapan 400 that was all unusable. It’s unpredictable, all bets are off. Think before wasting developer and your time with it.

  7. #17

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    Re: The perils of expired film

    Quote Originally Posted by consummate_fritterer View Post
    It is most definitely a problem with the scanner.
    You are right. It was, indeed a scanner/scanning issue. After checking the negs on a light table, I re-scanned and they look much better. Problem solved, although I'll be keeping a close eye on the Epson.

  8. #18

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    Re: The perils of expired film

    I have some boxes of Bergger 200 film that is outdated and was unfortunately not stored under refrigeration. Use it with an 8x10 pinhole camera and process it in Rodinal 1:25. Aggressive development doesn't help the issue of base + fog density, but using the negatives make Lith prints... well it just works out great in the end.

  9. #19
    DG 3313's Avatar
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    Re: The perils of expired film

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Sampson View Post
    Expired film will commonly show increased base fog- resulting in a loss of emulsion speed and contrast. Which can be compensated for, up to a point. Where that point is located is up to you. That said, the problems you show are not ones commonly associated with old film. If you have darkroom access, make a 'proper proof' of your negs and any film-related issues should show up.
    I just picked up 100 sheets of unopened Tri-x that expired in 1978. I have to rate it at iso 100 and print through the film base fog (as mentioned). But, the fog is even across the sheet and it was only $.50 a sheet. I have had less luck with opened boxes of film but, the sealed boxes have been good to go.

  10. #20

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    Re: The perils of expired film

    After sorting out the scanner hiccup, this film looks to be in good shape for the shape it’s in and, for my uses, I’m happy. At less than a dollar a sheet, not counting developing costs, a happy camper here. Thanks for all the suggestions, folks.

    Kenny

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